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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was at my local gun shop yesterday. The fellow behind the counter was showing several XDM's and XD's to some potential customers. Prior to handing them the pistol, he would lock the slide back (they all had magazines in them) and then proceed to thumb the slide release and let the slide slam home on an empty chamber. I casually mentioned that I didn't think that was a good thing to do and he got defensive and said that he does it all the time and it never has caused a problem, as that is only a concern on 1911 pistols.

What do you all think? I hate when I see that, I think it is unnecessarily harsh on the firearm.
 

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I'm with you. It's called a slide stop lever, not a slide release lever.
 

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It's a plastic combat weapon, not a plastic barbie doll.
 

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I'm not defending it one way or the other but what's the difference?

If you solely use the lever to make the slide go forward, to me that's the same thing as bringing the slide back manually with onehand on the slide, lowering the lever and then letting the slide go. One should not ride the slide forward as it needs to force the cartridge into the chamber. By riding the slide, the round may not be seated correctly.

Just my opinion as regardless of the method, the slide should be coming forward with the same force although by slightly pulling back on the slide and then lower the lever, this may decrease wear on the lever and any other associated internal components.
 

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Doesn't really matter in a gun shop setting, but I'm fond of not using the slide stop as a release because it's a fine motor skill. I do everything the same way I train, so.....
 

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I've been dropping the slide that way for years in a weekly league shoot. Well over 400 times with no issue I can discern.
Didn't see anything in the manual saying don't do it.

I'm sure the stop lever gets a lot more 'abuse' when stopping the slide upon an empty mag.
 

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The first paragraph under Weapon Handling Protocol in this link explains the technical reason for not doing this on a tuned 1911: https://10-8performance.com/pages/1911-User's-Guide.html

On a modern combat handgun, it probably won't hurt. I don't do it, I ease the slide down treating all my guns in a 1911 fashion. But I am cognizant of the fact that I don't want to make this easing action a habit to be used as if I am loading or clearing a jam. In those instances I let the slide fly - and I don't use the slide lock when doing so.
 

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It's not going to hurt anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just to clarify, I am not talking about dropping the slide when chambering a round, of course that is what you do. I am referring to dropping the slide on an empty chamber.
 

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I still don't think you're going to hurt anything.

What will hurt something, however, is if you manually put a round in the chamber using your fingers through the ejection port, then close the slide and slam it into battery.
 

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I still don't think you're going to hurt anything.

What will hurt something, however, is if you manually put a round in the chamber using your fingers through the ejection port, then close the slide and slam it into battery.
I won't say it WILL hurt, but it might, especially with internal extractors. I don't do it.

The "empty chamber" argument is that the slide is somewhat cushioned by the chambering of a round, but I don't believe that's a real problem with these loose chambers in combat pistols.
 

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What will hurt something, however, is if you manually put a round in the chamber using your fingers through the ejection port, then close the slide and slam it into battery.
BULL***T. I've had this argument before, I've shown and explained how it mechanically works, and there is ZERO adverse effects to be had. the extractor is ramped, meets the rim of the case on the angle of it's contacting face, is made of spring steel, and the channel it resides in has AMPLE room for flex.
 

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BULL***T. I've had this argument before, I've shown and explained how it mechanically works, and there is ZERO adverse effects to be had. the extractor is ramped, meets the rim of the case on the angle of it's contacting face, is made of spring steel, and the channel it resides in has AMPLE room for flex.
^^^ what he said.
 

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I always ride the slide forward onto an empty chamber, full release whenever chambering a round. Can't really explain why...my experience with 1911s, maybe. I try not to treat any of my stuff "roughly" (for lack of a better word) during "peacetime" operation, ie: cleaning, reassembly, dry-fire, etc. At the range, drilling (empty), plinking, or, obviously, in a fight, anytime live ammo is involved, the gun gets handled accordingly.
 

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Releasing the slide on an empty chamber does no harm to the XD or XDm pistols.
 

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BULL***T. I've had this argument before, I've shown and explained how it mechanically works, and there is ZERO adverse effects to be had. the extractor is ramped, meets the rim of the case on the angle of it's contacting face, is made of spring steel, and the channel it resides in has AMPLE room for flex.
I will gladly be a man and admit when I am wrong, but why does it say in the manual not to do this?
 

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I've always done it, even on my 1911's.

The old GI training manuals explain doing this as one of the function checks. If you drop the slide with the slide release the hammer should stay "cocked". If it follows the slide forward to the half cock notch, you need to let the armorer replace the worn parts.

I've never had one (hammer) follow the slide forward on a 1911.

As to the thing about dropping a round in the chamber and then letting the slide go forward I've done that in 1911s, Glocks, XDMs and M&P and now my CZs.

So far, the CZs are the only guns I've got that put a massive gouge/nick in the edge of the rim when the extractor is forced over the rim for the slide to reach the full forward position.
 

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I will gladly be a man and admit when I am wrong, but why does it say in the manual not to do this?
who do you think wrote the manual? it would constitute 1 piece of paper the size of a 4x6 if a machinist wrote it... so you can rule out a thinker.
 

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who do you think wrote the manual? it would constitute 1 piece of paper the size of a 4x6 if a machinist wrote it... so you can rule out a thinker.
So by that rationale Bill Laughridge at Cylinder & Slide is wrong when he advises not to do a 'plunk load'? Sorry bud, I am not doubting your credentials (mainly because I don't know them) but I am gonna take Bill's experience level and not do it to any of my firearms...YMMV
 
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