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Discussion Starter #1
well im building a cmmg 10.3" SBR and i was wondering if i need to get a H buffer if i dont NEED one is it a good idea though?
 

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It will probably function better with an H or H2 than a CAR buffer.
describe "function better".

Does the recoil of your sbr feel overly sharp?

this is a copy and paste from another post i did regarding buffer selection:

(the buffer that your AR will run)
depends on a lot of factors. BCG drag, buffer spring rate and age, barrel quality/gas seal, gas port size, FSB fit and gas seal, etc etc...

any one of those, or a combination of those things may preclude the use of a heavy buffer.

TO determine the buffer your carbine SHOULD be running, do the following.

dont clean your carbine for at least 500 rds.
take one of each weight buffer to the range, carbine, H, H1, H2, H3, 9mm
Load single rounds of WOLF in mags, and test with at LEAST 20 rounds for each buffer. just one round per mag, testing to see that the carbine locks back after that shot every time.

Whatever the HEAVIEST buffer is, that will STILL Reliably lock back on an empty mag, in a dirty carbine, shooting underpowered ammo........

is the buffer you want.

a good majority of quality carbines will stop at an H2 buffer. "commercial" type AR's may need a heavier buffer due to large (non spec) gas port size.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
describe "function better".

Does the recoil of your sbr feel overly sharp?

this is a copy and paste from another post i did regarding buffer selection:

(the buffer that your AR will run)
depends on a lot of factors. BCG drag, buffer spring rate and age, barrel quality/gas seal, gas port size, FSB fit and gas seal, etc etc...

any one of those, or a combination of those things may preclude the use of a heavy buffer.

TO determine the buffer your carbine SHOULD be running, do the following.

dont clean your carbine for at least 500 rds.
take one of each weight buffer to the range, carbine, H, H1, H2, H3, 9mm
Load single rounds of WOLF in mags, and test with at LEAST 20 rounds for each buffer. just one round per mag, testing to see that the carbine locks back after that shot every time.

Whatever the HEAVIEST buffer is, that will STILL Reliably lock back on an empty mag, in a dirty carbine, shooting underpowered ammo........

is the buffer you want.

a good majority of quality carbines will stop at an H2 buffer. "commercial" type AR's may need a heavier buffer due to large (non spec) gas port size.

well this does sound like a good way to find out. but i dont really want to buy 6 buffers to find out which one works the best. im not saying its a bad idea as it sounds liek a great idea if you have all 6

i allready have a regular buffer i have been using but thats on my 18" with a rifle length gas tube. with a 10.3 i imagine the gas port will have to be bigger and the pressures will be higher since its so short.
 

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pressure might not be greater, but the volume of gas should be greater. the volume needs to be greater because the length of bbl in front of the port is not enough to maintain the pressure.

you dont have to take every buffer out, but if you have access to them, then that is the proper way.

see if your sbr runs with an H buffer while dirty, and on crappy ammo. if it does, then drive on.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
what are the signs that your buffer is too light? i might try my regular buffer first that i allready have. but i dont knwo what to look for if my buffer is too light.
any advice would be great
thank you
 
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