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A couple of recent threads got me to thinking about a cheaper alternative to some of the large water filters on the market. One of the threads had a DIY filter utilizing the Black Berkey filter elements.

So ... I came up with my own DIY version for just the cost of the Berkey filers ($107.00) and a spigot ($10.00). While that's still not "cheap" it's half the cost of the least expensive Berkey and mine holds 4 gallons.

Materials Needed:
2 Black Berkey Filter Elements: $107.00
1 Berkey Light Spigot: $10.00
2 Four-gallon Food-grade Plastic Buckets (free at Sam's Club)

Tools Needed:
Drill
3/8" Drill Bit
5/8" Drill Bit

Step 1: Stack the buckets and drill two 3/8" holes through the bottom of the top bucket and the lid of the bottom bucket



Step 2: Insert the threaded tubes of the filter elements through the bottom of the top bucket and the lid of the bottom bucket. Screw the keeper nuts onto the filters and tighten them to finger-tight (do not over-tighten). The included washer should be on the filter tube inside the top bucket.



At this point your buckets should look like this:





Step 3: Drill a 5/8" hole in the side of the bottom bucket near the bottom. Make sure you leave enough room for the spigot's nozzle below the hole. Slide the threaded spigot tube through the hole and tighten down the keeper nut. There should be a washer on either side of the bucket.



Your finished filter will look like this.

 

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Very resourceful you are there. :p

Tagging this thread for future refererence. ;)
 

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You can do it MUCH cheaper. A "whole house" filter and some buckets to filter out the big chunks. Then store the water in clear glass or plastic in the sun for 2 days. The uv will sterilize it.

Google up on uv water sterilization. here's one hit

UV water treatment - Appropedia: The sustainability wiki
 

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Sorry John, but you really can't.

The OP's system actually purifies water ... It's not just a filter.

Black Berkey water filter technical specifications

Can't what? UV sterilize? it does. Straight sunlight will kill pathogens in as little as 4 hours. I said 2 days to give a buffer. It works less in the winter with the low sun, but if it's winter you're probably going to need to heat the water to filter it, why not boil the water anyway? But if its winter and there's snow, that's a straight pick up and put in mouth deal (avoid the color yellow;)).

If you are trying to purify water that is full of benzene and the other chemicals listed in the link site --- I would suggest you find a different water source and not puddles from behind the chemical plant :rolleyes:.

Guess we can choose different solutions and meet at the other end of the S storm to compare notes.
 

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But if its winter and there's snow, that's a straight pick up and put in mouth deal (avoid the color yellow;)).
This has been proven to dehydrate you more than anything.
 

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This has been proven to dehydrate you more than anything.
Not consuming any water won't help either.

Eating snow will expend heat and energy as the cold snow will try to lower your body temperature. What's more, there's roughly a 10 to 1 volume from snow to water which means it'll take a lot of snow to really hydrate you. It's recommended to melt the snow first and then drink the water to conserve heat/energy. Ice works better as it has a ratio of 2 to 1. Either will hydrate you, though.
 

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Forgot to mention, when it comes to the use of snow/ice as a source of water, basically try to avoid using body heat to melt the snow/ice. What I mean is, putting snow/ice in a Ziplock bag and then putting it inside your jacket or what have you will cool the area around the bag. How much heat/energy it takes to melt and its affect on you depends on the location. That's still better than in your mouth, though.
 

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Forgot to mention, when it comes to the use of snow/ice as a source of water, basically try to avoid using body heat to melt the snow/ice. What I mean is, putting snow/ice in a Ziplock bag and then putting it inside your jacket or what have you will cool the area around the bag. How much heat/energy it takes to melt and its affect on you depends on the location. That's still better than in your mouth, though.
If you are well insulated this might not be as big a problem. Also do not put the ice next to your body. Let it absorb the waste heat given off.
 
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