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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just read in a previous thread that a lot of you guys prefer the 550 over the 650. Any reason why? I just ordered a 650 and I am very excited about getting and using. Unfortunately, I'll have to wait till Xmas!

Just curious.
 

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I have both and I prefer the 650. The 550 is a solid press, but if you want to go fast and knock out 800 rounds an hour with little effort, get the 650. Whether you go with the 550 or the 650, get the case feeder. That will save you 20%+ on speed.

OS
 

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Calliber swaps are a little more involved on the 650. I load 9mm, .40s&w, and 38super on the 650 with only tool head and locator pin swaps. The 550 does everything with large primers and, since it can be used as a single stage press, all my rifle ammo.
Both great machines:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
OK, I appreciate the answers but no one has really answered my question. Some guys say they "prefer" the 550. I would like to know specifies on why the 550 over the 650.

Is the 550 sturdier, is it easier to use, does the 650 fail a lot or what?

I will mainly be reloading rifle calibers. I have a Lee Pro 1100 for my pistol calibers.

I have been reloading for many years on a single stage. I have recently REALLY gotten back into reloading after the dealers started to gouge on the price of ammo. It is tough to reload 500 or 600 or more rounds one at a time.

Actually the answer is kind of moot. I have already ordered a 650.
 

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The 550B is the workhorse of the line. I didn't actually prefer it over the 650. I chose it over the 650 because of initial cost, the cost of caliber conversions, simpler mechanism since it does not auto-index as the 650 does and I didn't need a case feeder for my volume of shooting. Also, auto-indexing machines have a tendency to toss powder out of 9mm or 40 cal cases when you are really cranking on them (I had a Dillon SDB and loaded a lot of 9mm).

Since my shooting volume is up, I would love to own a 650 and use it exclusively for 45acp loading w/ case feed and powder check system. I don't think I would buy the 650 for loading rifle calibers unless I was loading a high volume of .223. I prefer to size, decap and trim before loading, but that's me. I still load 5.7x28, .221, .223 and even .303 British on the Dillon, after they are sized, trimmed and cleaned.

You will be very pleased with your 650 and may find that you'll want to load pistol rounds on it as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks GW. This is the kind of information I was looking for.

I am a huge RCBS fan. But the upgrade for my Rock Chucker was manual indexing.

I wanted the auto indexing feature and that is the main of the reason I shied away from the 550.

Other than that, I knew noting about these presses except for what little research I had done online.

I bought the 650 mainly to do rifle. My little Lee Pro100 does great with pistol.

I batch load .223 and .308. I will load 500 to 600 at a time. And I plan to start doing the same thing with 7.62x39, 7.62x54r, 7.7jap and .303.

And besides can you say Cadillac?
 

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I bought the 650 mainly to do rifle. My little Lee Pro100 does great with pistol.

I batch load .223 and .308. I will load 500 to 600 at a time. And I plan to start doing the same thing with 7.62x39, 7.62x54r, 7.7jap and .303.

And besides can you say Cadillac?
Get a 2nd tool head for your depriming and resizing die.
Be sure to lube your rifle cases. Hornady One Shot has not failed me yet. Run everything through, take care of case prep, then change tool head and start cranking.
As for the 650 being picky, it needs to be mounted solidly. Bracing my case feeder to the wall made a world of difference. The strong mount is another plus.
 

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I bought the 550 because I figured that as long as I had to manually place a bullet on top of the case, indexing the shell plate wouldn't slow me down too much. It has done me well for well over 15 years but truthfully, if I had it to do over again I might be tempted to go with the 650 for the extra operation. I load a lot of .223 and I'm sure that there is something I could use the extra operation for. I've loaded a lot of ammo in a weekend with my 550! I'd like to get a chance to see the 650 in action.
 

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I would go with the 650 over the 550 for one very important reason and that is the 650 is a 5 station and the 550 is a 4 station.
With a 5 station press you can add a powder check die. Not a big deal until you blow your gun up from a double charge. This happened to one of my friends last summer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Get a 2nd tool head for your depriming and resizing die.
Be sure to lube your rifle cases. Hornady One Shot has not failed me yet. Run everything through, take care of case prep, then change tool head and start cranking.
As for the 650 being picky, it needs to be mounted solidly. Bracing my case feeder to the wall made a world of difference. The strong mount is another plus.
I bought an extra tool head for my .308 setup.

I guess I am not following your logic about an extra tool hear for the resizing/depriming die. Do you have only one die in a separate head for that dies? I don't understand why you would separate this operation from the tool head with all of the other dies in it.

As far as lubing the cases. I have had more than one case stuck because of the lack of lube!!!

Case prep. Like case length, polishing and stuff like that.
 

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I bought an extra tool head for my .308 setup.

I guess I am not following your logic about an extra tool hear for the resizing/depriming die. Do you have only one die in a separate head for that dies? I don't understand why you would separate this operation from the tool head with all of the other dies in it.

As far as lubing the cases. I have had more than one case stuck because of the lack of lube!!!

Case prep. Like case length, polishing and stuff like that.
1st tool head would have de-prime/resize die only. Or if you get the Dillon case trimmer, it can be put in station 2 or 3. If you trim manually, trimming, chamfering, deburring, primer pocket prep, and polishing would be next. Switch toolheads then prime, charge, seat, and crimp with the second tool head.
If all your rifle brass has been fired in your chamber, trimmed, and you are neck sizing only, all dies can be used on the same tool head. Full length resizing will get things bouncing around pretty good, no mater how much lube you use.
 
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