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Bodycam footage from the officer who shot the man wielding a knife and screwdriver after stabbing another victim at a convenience store. I see a slide pull in the middle of the confrontation. I thought Glocks never misfire?

 

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None of mine ever have.

But give her credit, she cleared it pronto and went back to shooting.

The attacker must have had a suicide wish to attack like that and keep coming. Glad she's OK.
 
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Looked like it had some issue. The biggest question I have is what caliber was she shooting a 9 MM? :rolleyes:
 

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Any gun can malfunction.
Possible dud rd bad primer.
Hell maybe it had lint in it.
Just cuz it says glock dont mean it wont F up.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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The shooter's hands repeatedly breaks off the gun during recoil. If you go slowly through the video, you'll see her hands break repeatedly from the gun.

It's very common to see otherwise proficient shooters fall apart under training stress - during either Force-on-Force or in integrated combative sessions. This includes not only marksmanship, but also shooter-incurred stoppages in an otherwise proven-reliable firearm.

The support hand breaking under recoil can potentially cause interference to the slide's travel - either velocity or path - which can cause stoppages.

The dominant/weapon hand breaking under recoil can cause stoppages typical of "limp wristing."

This is VERY commonly seen in Force-on-Force training.

To the officer's credit, though, as @Snaphook noted, she was able to efficiently clear the stoppage and continue fighting.

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The attacker must have had a suicide wish to attack like that and keep coming. Glad she's OK.
and

The biggest question I have is what caliber was she shooting a 9 MM? :rolleyes:
In terms of terminal ballistics and the attacker, we need to remember that stopping the threat necessitates the completion of one of two quantifiable criteria:

(1) That we've "hit the off switch" and incurred sufficient damage to a central nervous system structure.

(2) That we've incurred sufficient blood pressure drop in order to physiologically render the threat incapable of continuing with their desired physical actions.

Towards the latter, that damage incurred doesn't happen in the way movies and TV makes us believe that it does. Outside of a psychological stop, physiologic stops (exclusive of CNS) require sufficient damage to either the bony structures (very hard to effect with handguns), musculature (again), or by depleting the subject of blood flow/pressure - and the latter takes time, even for threats/attackers who are not chemically altered.



EXPECT the threat to continue to be a threat until you have positively ascertained that he/she no longer poses a threat.

As the late Pat Rogers liked to say:

"Just because you shot 'em doesn't mean that you've hurt 'em. Just because you've hurt 'em doesn't mean that you've stopped 'em. Just because you've stopped 'em doesn't mean that they're dead-right-there."

While this should be frame in the context of the military/LE taking down an active threat, we civilians should keep this in mind, too: that the fight won't necessarily stop after the first shot - that the other party always has a say in how the fight turns out. That we must accomplish our goal, that regardless of the level of force we must use, stop the threat. If I can stop the threat with my words and physical posturing, all the better. If I have to resort to OC before the threat scampers away, that's find by me, too. If I must go to hands or even shoot the threat before he or she stops, I then I will do so - I will immediately disengage after the threat ceases, but until that threat no longer acts in a way which endangers my life, my goal will continue to be to stop the threat.

And it is very important to realize that this goes the other way, too.

A lot of good trainers will play out Force-on-Force or integrated combatives scenarios by instructing "the good guy(s)/gal(s)" that they must keep fighting until the stop command is given, regardless of the "damage" that they take through the scenario.

Why?

It's to ingrain in our minds that as the defender, we NEED to keep on fighting.

Pat also had this to say:

“Just because you’re shot, doesn’t mean you’re dead. Just because you’re dead, doesn’t mean you’re dead right now. KEEP FIGHTING!”
 

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The biggest issue I see now is the substitution of capacity for accuracy. That probably speaks more to effectiveness than caliber and as Wyatt said "accuracy is final". It's tough to tell how many hits she had or what anyone of us would have done but I believe when he squared himself I would have opened up and kept pumping in rounds until he was down or I was empty. I truly believe all the criticism of law enforcement could cause hesitation. They are trying to arrest whereas I just want the threat ended regardless of what happens to the perp.
 

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^ I don't disagree, @Terry_P . I think that you do have a valid point, there: that sometimes, just by knowing that you've got so much more ammo onboard, it's possible that the shooter lets-fly when there's actually an otherwise unacceptable sight-package in the mix.

We see this in training classes and competitions all the time: when was the last time that any of us shared the line with a shooter who, upon missing a reactive steel, simply decides to sling more lead at it? I know that I've seen plenty of shooters do this, and heck, I will even admit that I've done it, myself: the latest? when I got so task-fixated on a MGM Spinner that I literally tried to get that start to spin by only shooting the bottom target 😅 :oops::ROFLMAO:. I was so embarrassed (and laughing hysterically) when I stepped off the line, having poured 20 useless rounds into the target. The instructor, who's now known me for going on 5 years, actually thought that I was trying to get the plate to "hover," given the splits that I was putting in. He's so kind.......

However, while this kind of problem is definitely a concern, we should also realize that even when shots have been delivered on-target, the results we are seeking simply may not manifest in the time-frame that we would like them to.

We have seen both in the Gramins:Maddox shooting above as well as in countless others that both the bad actors as well as the good can sustain otherwise mortal damage (i..e that they will in the immediate future - typically seconds to minutes - perish from this injury; "the walking dead") and yet still be effective as a lethal threat to the other party, if not lethally injure them:
Exclusive of a critical CNS shot, the human machine, when driven by the desire to fight, should not be discounted.

Remember also that for every surveillance video we see of the injured party running away after being mortally shot or stabbed, they could just as easily have sustained or even pressed the fight.
 

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The assailant contacts the top of the slide and pushes it down right before she discharges the round that led to the malfunction.
 

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The assailant contacts the top of the slide and pushes it down right before she discharges the round that led to the malfunction.
Watch it again at .25 speed on YT. You’ll see that the slide actually locks back before the scum gets within range. He actually knocks it back into battery for her. The ASP channel had a good deconstruct it is he shooting and the malfunction.
 
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