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Discussion Starter #1
I bought my new XD9 Service model yesterday. I asked my dealer for his preference in cleaning solutions so I could field strip and clean it before I fire it this weekend. He got a weird look on his face and said, "Why would you want to do that? It's new, so it's clean." He said that he's seen more damage done to semi-autos from people field stripping and cleaning too often than from anything else and that you should only clean after every couple thousand rounds or so.

Through all this I nodded and didn't say much, as I still plan on cleaning it initially and every time I get home from the range. :wink:

What do you think of this???
 

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No need to clean it beofre you go to the range. It is a good idea to clean it every 500 rounds or so I would say. At one point I put a couple thousand through mine without any kind of cleaning. Thats not a good idea though. i would say clean it as you see fit you wont hurt anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I thought I've read various places that you want to give a new handgun a good initial cleaning because the lubricants the factory uses for storage/shipping should be removed before use. (This is my first new firearm). Granted, I don't think it was ever said that it would hurt the firearm if this wasn't done, just a good idea. And of course I'm sure there's nothing that the factory would use for shipping/storage that would negatively affect the safety or accuracy of the gun.
 

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MeanStreaker said:
I thought I've read various places that you want to give a new handgun a good initial cleaning because the lubricants the factory uses for storage/shipping should be removed before use.
It's a good practice to get in to.
The goop they slather on from the factory is usually too thick, and will actually attract dirt, grit and fouling during your first outing.

I clean mine after each trip to the range. Perhaps I clean too often, but I've never had one single malfunction. So, to me, it is a valid practice.
 

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MeanStreaker said:
I thought I've read various places that you want to give a new handgun a good initial cleaning because the lubricants the factory uses for storage/shipping should be removed before use.
That is likely a remnant from the days that firearms were shipped caked in Cosmoline, however, some manufacturers (such as Browning with the Hi-Power) still recommend that their guns be cleaned prior to their first use. I wouldn't be worried so much about cleaning it before use than I would that it is properly lubricated (specifically the slide to frame interface) prior to use, particularly during initial use (aka break in).

Springfield's guidance in the XD Manual is a simple keep your gun clean at all times. I guess that individual interpretation may vary.
 

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I clean a new gun before taking it to the range just to make friends with it so it won't hurt me. I know that running a patch thru the barrel is a good idea just in case there's excess crap in it that would raise the pressure while shooting.

Lately I'm only running solvent and patches thru barrels most cleanings on guns I've had a while. I only use a brush on them when the fouling is obvious. I don't think consistent use of brass and bronze brushes would hurt a barrel, but I figure if it doesn't NEED it every time, why take the chance?
 

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true that rooster. i think the practice of cleaning it before initial use is from the days of cosmoline. my ak i just bought has cosmoline all over it- therefore im cleaning it before sundays outing. when i bought my xd it was clean and properly lubricated and shot like a dream my first time out. if the barrel looks clean and the rest of the gun is clean and lubed youre good to go. also make sure the slide operates smoothly. my ak does not operate worth a **** because its not properly lubed yet.
 

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Some people clean after every so many rounds, I clean mine and my wifes after every trip or two to the range. I think its a subjective thing but I have yet to see a gun not work because it was clean.

I clean every gun I buy BEFORE I shoot it so that I can:
1. Get to know it
2. Make sure everything is in good working order
3. Make sure its properly lubed
 

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It's just like my yungins. The hospital washed em before the waitin' period was up. So we just wash em every 1000 days or so. 'though I rekkun I really don't know how long it's been since the last time I hosed em down.

LOL
 

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Always clean a new gun. The dealer is an idiot. Most factories do not bother cleaning after they test fire it and just slap preservative lubricants on gun and ship it. As they usualy only fire no more then 10 rounds it is not a major deal but hey, it is a good habit to get into. Also some of those preservative greases are pretty nasty and could effect your balistics. ALWAYS CLEAN A MILSURP ARSENAL REFINISHED GUN!!! They look new, fresh bore and such but they are usualy in bad need of de-greaser on all parts. Remember, the better care you take of it the better it will serve you when you need it and it also keeps the resale value/trade value up.
 

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Don't forget to check you mags. I took mine apart and got some crap out of 2 of 3 with a lint free. I also did the onceover on the gun, like others have said , just to get a better idea of what is really going on to make it go boom, and not KABOOM !!
 

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I always clean a pistol or rifle that I have purchased prior to shooting the first time, first it gives you a fairly good idea on field stripping and second it allows you to check for proper operation and I always clean when back from the range whether it be 10 or 1000 rounds it should be cleaned IMHO
 

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falman308 said:
I always clean a pistol or rifle that I have purchased prior to shooting the first time, first it gives you a fairly good idea on field stripping and second it allows you to check for proper operation and I always clean when back from the range whether it be 10 or 1000 rounds it should be cleaned IMHO
Bingo. Cleaning for me serves several purposes.

1) Remove hard metals. Last thing I need is lead dust floating about the apartment.

2) Keeps the finish protected and operation proper.

3) Allows for a post-range inspection to visually inspect for newly created defects that may pose a problem or a risk later on.

One valid problem it can create is that if you dont clean it properly, your cleaning rod, et all can impact the rifling on the end of the barrel, causing a slight degredation of accuracy over time.

For this reason, insert your cleaning rod from the chamber end, NOT the barrel end.
 

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Definitely clean when you get a new gun. If cleaning causes damage, maybe it is better that the gun is not cleaned? For first shooting, I say clean the gun, after it breaks in clean how often/occasionally you want to.
 

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Just about every gun I've ever bought new I have cleaned first.

Several reasons --

Who knows who's been handling and messing around with it while it was on display. It could have been assembled wrong or with missing pieces. I like to verify everything is present and in good shape.

It's not universal practice for factories to ship guns properly lubricated for operation. I like to lube my guns properly before using them.

There have been several occasions where I've found metal chips or shavings still in the gun from the factory.
 

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once upon a time when i owned a taurus pt111p, the manual said that you must clean after 500 rounds otherwise the gun is considered dangerous in the shooter's hands
i clean mine every night i get home, i manage a restaurant and the floating nasties just really make your firearms rust buckets, i learned from my bersa
i carry xd-40 now and again as I once before the bersa, love the thing to death and i baby it
 

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There have been a couple of "torture" tests published by some of the gun magazines. One is on an XD9 and the other as I recall is on the Sig 220. On these tests, I believe they start shooting right out of the box.

The most important thing to do, is to run a jag or a bore snake through the barrel.

There are some that say you need to "season" a barrel. I do not know of many or any who do this with a pistol barrel. A high end rifle you are supposed to shoot; then run a brush and jag, shoot then clean again. You do this 10 cycles then you clean every 10 rounds until you reach 50 rounds total or so then clean as your usual routine.
 
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