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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have done some searching but can't seem to come up with a definitive answer. I have read in a lot of places that it is recommended to taper crimp 9mm rounds in a semi-auto (XD9SC to be exact). I have the Lee 3 die set and can't seem to understand or figure out how to make this crimp with the bullet seating die? Do I need to do this process in a whole different step after I seat the bullet or can I adjust the die so it will seat the bullet and crimp the case at the same time? Or would I just be better off bying the Lee Factory crimp dies with every round I decide to make?
 

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Crimping is done with a separate die. The Lee 4-die set comes with the Factory Crimp Die. You can also purchase it separately.
 

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Crimping is done with a separate die. The Lee 4-die set comes with the Factory Crimp Die. You can also purchase it separately.
I bought the original 3-die Lee set, then added the Taper Crimp die.

I did some testing with crimped and non-crimped rounds (9mm). The variance among velocities with the crimped rounds was less than the non-crimped rounds. But there was little variation in average velocity. Go figure.
 

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You can crimp with the seating die in the same operation. Did the dies come with instructions? Those should point you in the right direction.

But this is how I would go about crimping: Raise the ram and adjust the seating die until it touches the shell holder, then back out a turn or two. Adjust the seating screw until you have your proper seating depth then back out the seating screw. With the cartridge in the shell holder and the ram raised, screw in the seating die until it you feel it just touch the neck then turn in 1/4 turn until you get a good crimp. Lastly, adjust the seating screw in until it touches the bullet. That should do it but it may take a bit of tweaking to dial it in. Hope this helps.

The main thing about the factory crimp die is it runs the cartridge through a sizer to ensure the bullets feed smoothly.
 

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The Factory Crimp Die is the bomb and will save you many headaches. Highly recommended.
 

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I use the factory crimp die, too.

I got the deluxe set for my .40, but I think my die set is bad....

damn FCD is grabbing HARD on the casings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the quick responses. As for the directions that come with the dies, they don't seem to be very good as compared to other brands directoions. Guess i am going to have to get me one of those factory crimp dies for all the rounds I plan on reloading. I've heard great things about them where ever I go. Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
One more question about 9mm crimping. What does eyeryone end up with their final crimp measurement? Is something like .373 to .374 sound right?
 

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One more question about 9mm crimping. What does eyeryone end up with their final crimp measurement? Is something like .373 to .374 sound right?
Trying to measure the end of a taper crimp would be very difficult. You can just adjust the die until you just see a very slight taper on the brass.

Are you loading on a single stage press, or a progressive?

If using a single stage, I would not use a separate crimp die, because that would be an extra stroke of the loader handle for each round. The bullet seating die can work just fine as the crimp die.

That being said if you are using a progressive press, and have the extra hole for the separate crimp die, it is very nice to have.
 

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BTW

If you don't already have a bullet puller, you should get one to disassemble your screw ups.

I myself have never screwed up a reload, but I have heard the other people do sometimes. :wink:
 

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One more question about 9mm crimping. What does eyeryone end up with their final crimp measurement? Is something like .373 to .374 sound right?
+1. It's easy to do with the factory crimp die since you can just turn the knob until you get what you want.

I put little lines on mine to index the crimps of different loads. But I crimp 9mm to about .374.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks again. I have been using a RCBS taper crimp/bullet seating die for just crimping. I have unscrewed the bullet seater way up and been keeping my crimps around .374 to .375 which is only .002" or .003" smaller than what the original winchester brass started out with. The reason for the RCBS is that I was given this die from a friend, but I still plan on buying the Lee FCD someday when I have some cash and an order built up for Midway.

BTW I am only using a single stage press, but I don't mind the extra stroke as it goes pretty fast once I get to the crimping process. Especially the peice of mind knowing that during feeding of the 9mm round, I don't have the possibility of the bullet becoming seated further into the case causing excessive pressures that I did not plan on!
 
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