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Anybody ever done this? I watched it on You Tube and decided to give it a try. I had picked up close to 500 cases at the range over a coupe week period. I processed them like I normally wood, but, didnt realize that over half my brass was Lake city with crimps. So I tried it on about 20 cases and it seems to work good about 98% of the time. There were one or two that still had issues accepting primers after using the bit. The video is below.

 

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I have used a case mouth chamfer tool same thing. You just have to be careful & not take too much out of the pocket.
 

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That looks like a good way to RUIN good brass. The counter sink will take too much brass from the wrong places and weaken the brass case. The correct tool to use does not require a power drill. They make a tool that screws to your bench and has a crank handle to hand turn. I have one and have used it for many years. it only takes 1 or 2 turns of the crank to remove a crimp. It comes with a large and small primer cup reamer and works better than the counter sink on a power drill. If anyone needs a picture I will provide a link to order from. The sell for around $15.

http://auction-e.com/lyman-pedestal-crank-case-care-preparation-kit-k201491934.html

This isn't the best picture but it clamps or screws to your bench. Price with several diffweenr tool bits $19.95
 

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That looks like a good way to RUIN good brass. The counter sink will take too much brass from the wrong places and weaken the brass case. The correct tool to use does not require a power drill. They make a tool that screws to your bench and has a crank handle to hand turn. I have one and have used it for many years. it only takes 1 or 2 turns of the crank to remove a crimp. It comes with a large and small primer cup reamer and works better than the counter sink on a power drill. If anyone needs a picture I will provide a link to order from. The sell for around $15.
A link would be great......ty
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I dont think it will weaken the brass since it is a one time deal. It bevels the very very top of the primer pocket. All you really have to do is just touch it for a second to get the desired effect. I agree its not the right tool for the job, I was just looking for an alternative to the Dillon 600 and the RCBS dies as my budget has gotten tight and I was not aware of another option.
 

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I found this link with picture. You can hand crank just as fast or faster than power drill with much better results.

Lyman Pedestal Crank Case Care & Preparation Kit

Kit includes large and small primer pocket swager, ream/clean primer pockets, chamfer/deburr case mouths, brush attachment for clean insidecase mouth or apply lubricants.

One or two turns of the crank for each case is all that is needed,

Purchase most any place Lyman products are sold for $20
 

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I've done about 3000 cases like this and the only ones that got ruined were the ones I didn't take enough material out of. If I don't like the way the primer feels going in, then that case goes in a bucket that will go to the scrap yard when it's full to be sold by the pound.
 

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I've done about 3000 cases like this and the only ones that got ruined were the ones I didn't take enough material out of. If I don't like the way the primer feels going in, then that case goes in a bucket that will go to the scrap yard when it's full to be sold by the pound.
How many ruined cases does it take to amount to $20?

Any damage to cases will show up after several firings (or only one) which may result in split case heads or enlarged primer pockets. Drill swagging has to weaken the case head by removing too much material removed. Lyman product only removes the burr inside the primer pocket, no other material. But everyone has their own choice. Brass is too expensive to ruin IMHO.
If you want to continue using an electric drill you can get a primer swagger tip which will go inside the primer pocket to do the correct job.
 

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Pretty tough to ruin brass using a chamfer tool. It takes very little metal off if you just pay attention. I have used one for years to remove the occasional crimped pocket. If you do a lot of milspec brass, a proper tool is just faster & easier to use.
 

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I like the Hornady Primer Pocket Reamer. I'll often chuck the cutter in a vise-mountd drill. Because it indexes off the bottom of the primer pocket you don't have to worry much about cutting too deep. If you try hard enough and wallow the case around you can get the pocket too big.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
As you can see by the pic below, only small fraction of material is removed and I dont see how this would weaken the brass whatsoever. In all the cases I swaged this way, no flash holes were touched as well. I did about 200 cases in 30 minutes.



With Primer
 

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Anybody ever done this? I watched it on You Tube and decided to give it a try. I had picked up close to 500 cases at the range over a coupe week period. I processed them like I normally wood, but, didnt realize that over half my brass was Lake city with crimps. So I tried it on about 20 cases and it seems to work good about 98% of the time. There were one or two that still had issues accepting primers after using the bit. The video is below.

YouTube - ‪.223/5.56 military crimped primer pocket ream job....‬‏

I use the same one. In the trades, us "Old timer" carpenters call it a "rosebud" countersink. My only suggestion; watching you do it, is that you are using too much of an high rpm. Don't let the gun wind up so much - set the speed to "2" instead of "1" and just bump it. as soon as you see a "ring" of brass (the actual crimp) come off STOP! You're done! lol

Otherwise you are fine doing what you're doing. A chamfered counter sink like that is taking more material out in an "outwards" direction than it is in depth.

carry on.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I use the same one. In the trades, us "Old timer" carpenters call it a "rosebud" countersink. My only suggestion; watching you do it, is that you are using too much of an high rpm. Don't let the gun wind up so much - set the speed to "2" instead of "1" and just bump it. as soon as you see a "ring" of brass (the actual crimp) come off STOP! You're done! lol

Otherwise you are fine doing what you're doing. A chamfered counter sink like that is taking more material out in an "outwards" direction than it is in depth.

carry on.
Thanks, but, thats not me in the video. I just found it. Thanks for the advice though.
 
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