Springfield XD Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Since my return from Afghanistan and I have bought several guns in about a two months period and from the looks of it I don't think I will stop. I just placed an order for two 1911s. Such a sickening disease!

I talk and go to a range with someone who shoots competitively, shoots often and has MANY weapons. He has talked to me about reloading and I have calculated the cost/savings.

Right now all I can do is dream of shooting often due to me buying ammo in bulk. So I am thinking of reloading and by doing that I think I can save money in the long run. I'd love to shoot as much as I can. I just started so right now I am a target shooter.

I am in the military, so I have the weekends to myself and time would not be an issue compared to another OP who was thinking about reloading. I do not have any other expensive hobbies.

I would like to reload since I thinking of getting my wife into it when she flies out to be with me and might purchase more firearms in the future.

It seems like Dillon Precision is the kit to look into.

For you re-loaders, what kit would you recommend for a novice? I'll spend about $1000 for a full multi-stage kit. I do not want to buy a single stage kit and later want to upgrade. the XL650 was recommended by my buddy. We did a price estimate for the XL650 with all bells and whistles and it was about $1200. My buddy can assist me with reloading.

All other tips/advise is appreciated.

Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,738 Posts
Maybe you should put reloading off until you have a permanent address and are out of the service. A good setup takes up a lot of space and can not easily be moved everytime you get sent to another base or APO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Maybe you should put reloading off until you have a permanent address and are out of the service. A good setup takes up a lot of space and can not easily be moved everytime you get sent to another base or APO.

permanent address?

Out of service? hahaha....I have a long way to go! I've been in for about 2yrs! I am looking at sticking through until retirement!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,574 Posts
If you have a good mentor (sounds like you may) that can walk you through the learning curve on a progressive press, you can't go wrong with the Dillon 650. I use one for all of my handgun reloading (precision reloading for my .308 is still done on a single stage press).

You don't have to get the auto shell feed, etc. right off the bat. That can be added later with no loss to what you already purchased. I still haven't picked one up for mine but may have some point. I didn't get my Dillon until I had been reloading for over 30 years.

Good luck on your reloading journey. I've been at it since I was first in the service. (great time to start) That was long time ago.

And thank you for your service. It is greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,762 Posts
you mentioned that you wanted to spend $1000, and you noted that the 650 with all kit added to $1200. If that is turning you off, I would suggest the Hornady Lock-N-Load. I have been very happy with mine. Bought the Hornady press new, four sets of dies new, some kit new, some other kit used including the RCBS single stage that I started with - I am now in for $828.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I am a 1LT Medical Service Officer with some prior service in the Army Reserves, so I get paid a lot more than a buck LT with no prior service.

My "mentor" is a EOD MAJ who is very knowledgeable and willing to help me. He has a massive weapons collection that I will never reach being married. hahaha.

Price is technically not an issue. I have purchased and have about 1500 9mm and 1500 380ACP to include 5000 22LR. That alone is about the price of a kit. I recently purchased a SA Loaded 9mm and SA Loaded .45 Champion LW, so I am entering the journey to the .45 world, so I definitely need to look into the option of loading. I will spend as much as it takes to be satisfied the first go around than to regret it and spend more later.

I have seen the Hornady Lock-N-Load.I do not know about it so I am going to ask my buddy on his opinions about it. Right now I am not a competitive/die hard shooter. You can say I am an amateur or novice, but I am all in for saving long term.

I have always wanted to own a firearm as a kid and now since my return I have relived that desire and it is an incurable disease and I love it! I am lucky my wife is okay with me purchasing weapons frequently. I have spent about $4000 on this hobby since I got back
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,197 Posts
Maybe you should put reloading off until you have a permanent address and are out of the service. A good setup takes up a lot of space and can not easily be moved everytime you get sent to another base or APO.
Actually, not true. I currently reload in one side of a 3car garage, yeah, it's a lot of room, but I have three presses. I have reloaded in a 24x36 coat closet. It's eaily done. You don;t even need a fixed bench, although desireable, a sturdy WOrkmate w/ add'l top works.
While the 650 is a great machine, it's really not for everyone. I view it as a production machine for one or two sim calibers. Mine is setup for 45acp & the only other caliber I would load on it is 45colt, that's if I get back into CAS. Everything else gets done on the 550B or SS press for my rifle hunting & target rounds. The 550B is cheaper to start w/ & to add calibers, no case feeder to deal with & it still easily loads 400rds+/hr. Most just don't need more than that. The LNL is also another press to consider. It can be quirky, but was designed for a case feeder but happily runs w/o one like the 550B.
You have a mentor, that is THE best way to learn. A good reloading manual is needed & most have good short sections on how to. I recommend the Lyman & Speer first, you always need at least two. Welcome home, thanks for your service.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Speaking of the 550B, I am assuming you love it?

I was looking on Dillon's reloader recommendation and they have the Super Deal "B"@ $370, 550B @ $420, and the 650 @ $550.

I was looking at the Super Deal B because it has pretty much everything the XL650 has minus the 5th stage. Pretty much I was looking at the other two since it does most of the 650.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Hmmm....Been reading on another thread that it'll take you about 15,000 loads to recoup your money, which is awhile...

Looking at mostly just using it for handgun 9mm/45ACP reloads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
602 Posts
Consider a Lee Classic Turret press.

It bridges the gap between single-stage and progressive, both in cost and skill level required to make safe ammo.

I wouldn't start out dropping a grand on reloading gear right out of the gate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,197 Posts
Hmmm....Been reading on another thread that it'll take you about 15,000 loads to recoup your money, which is awhile...

Looking at mostly just using it for handgun 9mm/45ACP reloads.
The only rub on the SDB, it uses Dillon dies & no rifle or 357sig. SO that lead me to the 550 some 20+ yrs ago. Yes, it's a great press, easiest of the progressives to get up & keep running. Many think the manual indexing is an issue, but their is little to no speed advantage, you place the bullet as you index the shell plate. On a 650 or LNL, you place the bullet after the shell plate auto indexs, so? Pay a ttention, you won't eve double or squib load.
Cost, not even close to 15K, but depends on what you load vs what you buy & how much you shoot. The larger the caliber the faster the payback on gear. Consider you can load for almost exactly half price of cheap factory ammo for service calibers, cheaper for magnums & semi exotics like the 357sig & 10mm & all rifle rounds but 7.62x39 (no cheap brass).
So if you are buying 45acp FMJ for $20/50, you can load it for just under $10/50 buying bullets, powder & primers in bulk. I do NOT count brass cost as you should have been saving your brass, but even if you buy once fired & amortize it over 10 reloads, it's less than 1c each.
Shoot 500rds of 9mm/m, that is 5X$20X12=6K @ $1200/yr for 9mm. Same 500rds of 45acp/m, is 5X$40X12=6K @ $2400/yr. Reloading saves you half of that. So you can pay for a top of the line reloading setup in about 8000rds of 9mm & 4000rds of 45acp if my math is right, not even close to 15K rds. You get to 15K rds & you are saving enough to buy new guns.;)
Yes there is a time factor, but w/ a modern, quality progressive, even slowing way down, 350rds/hr is a breeze, go a bit faster & 450rds is easily done. Get a high end machine like the 650 w/ case feeder, 700rds/ hour+ is possible. The best part, the ammo is higher quality than the cheap Russian & WWB, UMC, etc & you have it whenever you want, just a trip to the garage. You can have all of your components delivered to your home. Really doesn't get better than that unless you get free ammo from the govt.:oops: You just need to decide what press & jump in. The mentor makes it a no brainer as most, if they are honest, resist reloading because they fear it. WHile it isn't rocket science, you can do bad things to your gun & body if you are not diligent. So while not for everyone, I just don't see how anyone shoots enough to get really good buying factory ammo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
thanks for the info. I figured that 15,000 recoup figure was off. Plus, I think I'll shoot as much as the 500rds/month estimate you threw out.

I have watched videos that explained every step and it was the RL550B setup. I was leaning towards the RL550B kit. I don't think I'll shoot enough to warrant the auto feeder and other bells. I saw a lot of videos of people loading proficiently with the manual index. I guess I am the type that wants the best first time around.

Any hornady LNL users?

thanks for the info guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I had no loading experience when I was just getting into shooting. I jumped right in by purchasing the "top notch" 550 kit. Like you I watched you tube videos to see if this would be something I would be comfortable with. Most of the time I hear people mention it's not so much the cost savings, but the fact you can shoot more for the same cost. I couldn't be happier with my 550. What I am most happy with is that I now have a good understanding of ammo. It sounds like you know what you want. Go for it and good luck to you. Thanks for your service.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Yes, I am leaning towards the Dillon RL550B. Although, it seems like the Hornady Lock-N-Load is a good contender. It seems just as good. If not, a bit better based on reviews. Plus, it seems cheaper and also has the lifetime warranty.

For you RL550B owners, What extra accessories do you guys have? Auto case/bullet feeder? Alarms? Please tell me what you have and how much you spent?

If I get the hornady or dillon, it looks like an avg expense of $800.

THank you guys for reminding that I enjoy what I do!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,197 Posts
Yes, I am leaning towards the Dillon RL550B. Although, it seems like the Hornady Lock-N-Load is a good contender. It seems just as good. If not, a bit better based on reviews. Plus, it seems cheaper and also has the lifetime warranty.

For you RL550B owners, What extra accessories do you guys have? Auto case/bullet feeder? Alarms? Please tell me what you have and how much you spent?

If I get the hornady or dillon, it looks like an avg expense of $800.

THank you guys for reminding that I enjoy what I do!
I don't veiw the LNL vs a 550B as one being "better", just diff. SOme like the 5 stns of a LNL or 650, let's you put a no powder sensor die in one stn, not a bad idea, but NEVER replaces visual inspection where possible. Again, the auto indexing is NOT a speed advantage, but a convenience. It can also be a PITA when something goes wrong, like bad case, bad bullet, etc.
SO my recommendation, owning a 550b, 650 & loading quite a bit on a friends LNL; if you want a case feeder & auto indexing, then the LNL is a good press for the money. If you want to add a bullet feeder, you need 5stns, the LNL or 650 is it.
If you want a good machine for several calibers & want to swap them often, the 550B is a better fit IMO. Just easier to swap out calibers & have everything still run right. The 650, to me, better machine than the LNL by just a bit because of the priming system & superior case feeder. I view it though as a production machine that you setup & leave setup for one or two calibers that you load a ton of ammo for, preferably of the same primer size.
Extras for the 550B range from none to whatever you want to spend. It needs nothing but the early primer warning. The strong mount is nice if you load standing. The attached bins are nice, but you can do fine w/ a box of bullets on the left |& box of brass on the right. The roller handle, to me, it should be sold with one & the ball handle the option. Extra tool heads & powder dies for caliber changes. A couple of extra primer tubes. That is really all you "need" for a 550B.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I don't veiw the LNL vs a 550B as one being "better", just diff. SOme like the 5 stns of a LNL or 650, let's you put a no powder sensor die in one stn, not a bad idea, but NEVER replaces visual inspection where possible. Again, the auto indexing is NOT a speed advantage, but a convenience. It can also be a PITA when something goes wrong, like bad case, bad bullet, etc.
SO my recommendation, owning a 550b, 650 & loading quite a bit on a friends LNL; if you want a case feeder & auto indexing, then the LNL is a good press for the money. If you want to add a bullet feeder, you need 5stns, the LNL or 650 is it.
If you want a good machine for several calibers & want to swap them often, the 550B is a better fit IMO. Just easier to swap out calibers & have everything still run right. The 650, to me, better machine than the LNL by just a bit because of the priming system & superior case feeder. I view it though as a production machine that you setup & leave setup for one or two calibers that you load a ton of ammo for, preferably of the same primer size.
Extras for the 550B range from none to whatever you want to spend. It needs nothing but the early primer warning. The strong mount is nice if you load standing. The attached bins are nice, but you can do fine w/ a box of bullets on the left |& box of brass on the right. The roller handle, to me, it should be sold with one & the ball handle the option. Extra tool heads & powder dies for caliber changes. A couple of extra primer tubes. That is really all you "need" for a 550B.
So far, I am stuck between the LNL and the 550B. I liked the auto indexing of the LNL and was told that the LNL is cheaper for when you want to load other calibers. This is off hearsay since I have no experience. I don't think i'll need the case feeder or that the auto indexing is necessary, but I'd like the feature. this is more for casual shooting so I don't think I need all those automated attachments. Seems like a lot of people get it for convenience, but I think I can use the money for something else. I am not sure about the LNL but I did like how the Dillon has a toolhead kit where it holds the dies together for quick caliber swaps. In addition, I did like the option of the strong mount and roller handle of the Dillon. I am not sure what options hornady has for it. They did not have an extensive website like dillon and can only be picked up through their license retailers.

If I really do get a reloading kit, I'd want to stay within certain calibers as to not buy too much stuff. So far I am looking at reloading for 9mm and .45ACP. Also, maybe .380ACP.

Plus, Dillon is offering a 10% military discount!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
691 Posts
Maybe you should put reloading off until you have a permanent address and are out of the service. A good setup takes up a lot of space and can not easily be moved everytime you get sent to another base or APO.
My reloading "bench" is a 1x12x32 board with another 1x under the press so it is lag bolted to 1.5" of wood. Front and rear have 1x2 aprons, the back is bolted to the wall with the front held up by 2x4 legs. underneath are 2 hanging shelves with the upper having my dies, tools, reloading paraphernalia, and the lower shelf has powder and primers. Bullets are on the floor underneath that. Being bolted to the wall, this is a very sturdy setup. I picked this small of a space on purpose, I can be disorganized if I let myself. This forces me to only keep items for the current operation on the bench with no room for extra, thus keeping me organized. When I switch calibers, the unused dies, primers, powder, casings all have to be put away to make room for the current run of ammo, and this forces me to keep focused on what I am doing with no chance of doing something stupid like mixing powders. In other words, this keeps me safe. I know my limitations and have engineered accordingly :D This also shows that reloading does not have to take up a lot of space.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
886 Posts
I may be wrong but the progressives are for loading 4000+ rounds a year type press. I like the Lyman t-mag. Set 2 different pistols or 3 different rifles at one time in press. Right now loading for 2 different pistols.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top