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Hey all,

So I've had my xd40 5" tactical for about 6 months and I love it. As a new gun owner who has done a decent amount of research here's my question:

can you explain to me in simple terms why can I be convinced that it is "safe" to store or carry cocked and locked, and have faith that it will not misfire? In my mind it seems like it could go off if it was dropped or if the piece holding the pin broke unexpectedly.
 

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It is a modern, well designed and built pistol that has proven itself to be reliable.
If they were just going off there would be hell to pay and you would have heard of it.
You made a good choice, trust and enjoy it.
 

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Research the mechanics of why they don’t just go off. There are multiple safeties on the XD series as there are on all firearms.

If you’re worried. Try this test. Carry it totally unloaded. Check to see if the striker has at any time fallen.

Another thing to do is to unload the pistol and take the slide off the frame and turn it over. Look at how beefy the striker safety is. Look at how overbuilt the XD components are. This is truly a pistol built for serious duty/combat use. It has a proven track record of safety and reliability.

Don’t worry, I was in your shoes when I first started a few years back.


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I've heard of FN and SIG striker fired pistols going off when dropped/bumped and both companies have been sued, had recalls to replace original parts and made changes to their design over it.

I've not hear of the XD or XDM models having those issues.

I have a couple XDMs and one XD. Never have they failed to feed/chamber/fire/eject as they are supposed to. I wish I had more time to shoot the big XD .45 Tactical.

Get a good secure holster, practice with it, carry with it, enjoy it and hope you never have to really use it to defend yourself. Not because of a fear it won't work, but because of the aftermath of that use on your mind, your family and your wallet.
 

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Here ya go.
Even a Springfield 45 used in animation.

The gun is SAFE to be carried “hot” with or with out manual safety engaged (if so equipped). The best safety it has is YOU.




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...can you explain to me in simple terms why can I be convinced that it is "safe" to store or carry cocked and locked, and have faith that it will not misfire? In my mind it seems like it could go off if it was dropped or if the piece holding the pin broke unexpectedly.
CAN a failure that causes an XD that is carried chambered to self-discharge - without the trigger willfully pulled by the shooter - occur?

Definitely.

Is it LIKELY?

No, it is highly UNlikely.

The only times I've seen a modern duty/defensive-grade autopistol self-discharge over the span of my 10 years in this sport/hobby so-far were two highly abnormal instances.

In one, the firearm discharged after having returned-to-battery from a reload that the shooter executed: this instance was actually recorded and witnessed by several other shooters - and luckily, the discharged round went into the berm behind the target. The root cause, after the gun was examined by a highly competent on-site (the inspection was immediate) gunsmith (REF: Concealed carry. Chambered or not chambered?), was that it got just too dirty, in just the right spot.

The other was a mechanical defect (weird and unexpected breakage).

The last one was of unknown cause.

Unfortunately, @BENXD40TACTICAL , in my experience, I cannot convince anyone of this: either to carry with the round chambered or not. More than likely, I've come to learn, that those who are posting about this issue are simply looking for reasons to support their own view.

As I noted in the referenced thread above, for those who carry in "Condition 1" - the round-in-the-chamber crowd - it's absolutely irrefutable that, with all else held equal the draw-to-shoot via "Condition3/without a round chambered" is simply NOT "as fast." C3 is absolutely and definitively not "just as fast," and a simple stopwatch or shot-timer will readily demonstrate this -ABSOLUTE- fact.

Similarly, for those who desire to carry "C3/without a round chambered," it's also undeniable that without a round chambered, the gun simply cannot discharge a bullet from its muzzle. No matter how unlikely the C1 crowd maintains that such an event is not likely to happen, it is nevertheless still within the realm of possibility - and actually has happened. Therefore, for those who desire to carry C3 as an extra measure of safety, their argument is just as logical and just as sound as for those who carry C1 on the basis of reactionary speed.

The reasons that each of us may choose to self-validate our preferences can be numerous, and their validity can stretch from more than reasonable to all but ridiculous.

To me, that's not worth worrying about, and does nothing but to muddy the waters.

To me, the two absolutes I presented above are all that really need to be considered or said. And to me, both of these reasons are equally valid.

A lot of shooters would suggest that "training" ameliorates the fears of those who insist on C3 carry. To me, this doesn't make much sense. To me, all that training reinforces is the difference in timing that separates C1/C3. Good training - everything from flat-range to Force-on-Force - has shown me that in the civilian, legal concealed-carry, reactive defensive shooting context, there's a deficit of time and/or initiative that I can never recover with C3 carry.

To me, the way to gain the necessary confidence in your concealed-carry handgun not "going off" is via experience and understanding/knowledge.

Knowledge in how your chosen firearms work - so that you can gain confidence in knowing that mechanical problems are rare (the same thought goes into if you are afraid to fly - in comparing the safety systems and statistics to, for example, driving). With the XD platform, understand the roles of the drop safety, the striker safety, and the grip safety and how they interplay.

Gain first-hand experience for yourself by staging the firearm in your chosen mode/state of carry/storage (dry/cleared of live-ammo, if-necessary), so that you can see for yourself, over time, that the gun will not spontaneously/without external cause let go of the firing pin/hammer and cause the weapon to "fire." Maybe at first for a few hours (i.e. range time: this will of-course be done with live ammo). Maybe then for a day. Then for several days to a week. Then maybe a month, and then several months.....

Three of my four XDms have been loaded virtually 24/7 since the day they were bought - two of which are closing in on their 10th anniversary. None of the three have ever dropped the striker without my actuating the trigger (note: cumulatively, I have close to 80,000 - no, I didn't add a zero by mistake, that's eighty thousand - live-fire rounds thorugh these weapons.
 

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IF you do proper cleaning and maintenance of the firearm(any firearm) the chances of a mechanical malfunction should be nil.

Been shooting and around firearms for over 50 yrs. NEVER seen one GO BANG without some type of human interaction causing said bang.

Have been carrying a striker fired gun for over 5 yrs now (M&P shield 40 and 45) always “hot” have even more than once dropped it for whatever reason and NEVER once has one gone bang.

IF your not comfortable carrying a gun hot or condition one I suggest you dont do so.

NO I am not “supporting my way” I am basing MY choice on FACT.

Be smart stay safe and carry how ever YOU feel comfortable doing so.

OR get a revolver


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In the 35 years I've been active with Firearms, I've never seen one discharge "by itself', so I'd say it's extremely rare.

Carry whichever way you're comfortable. Practice the way you carry. And don't switch carry methods back and forth. If you carry condition 3, carry all of your wrapons condition 3. If you gain confidence or otherwise change your mind and decide to carry condition 1, carry all of your weapons condition 1. Switching back and forth may lead to not knowing whether your firearm is ready to fire when you really need it to.
 

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I am supporting the "right way", either carry the gun loaded or leave it at home.

People get killed because those that are scared and carry an expensive paperweight, they die then their gun can then be used to kill more people.



If you want to tell me you can Israeli carry, bring yourself to my location and I will load simunituin ammo into my gun and show you how wrong you are.
I will laugh loudly at the welts you are covered with after losing, so be aware of that.


ETA: I have legally carried a gun daily since 1992 and have NEVER dropped a firearm, loaded or empty.
If you are dropping guns there is a bigger "issue" than if it fires or not.
 

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Going back to "dropping the gun" -

A properly designed duty/defensive handgun, @BENXD40TACTICAL , should not self-discharge (i.e. discharge without the trigger being pulled) when dropped.

There has been a recent, popular, striker-fired autopistol which failed such instances, but that was due to a design deficiency that was later addressed by the manufacturer.

Dropping the gun is possible when drawing under stress (training/practice or competition), particularly when moving (yet another instance where the gun could separate from your hand[ s]) or engaging in physical combatives, but the pistol self-discharging from such an instance should not be among your worries, no matter if it drops onto carpeted flooring, hardwood, concrete, gravel or dirt.

To wit: this is why shooters are strongly discouraged to reach for and "catch" their falling handgun. It is drastically - almost infinitely - more likely that you'll accidentally hook a finger into the trigger guard and pull the trigger as you try to catch the falling pistol, versus the gun hitting the deck and "going off."
 

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I am supporting the "right way", either carry the gun loaded or leave it at home.

People get killed because those that are scared and carry an expensive paperweight, they die then their gun can then be used to kill more people.



If you want to tell me you can Israeli carry, bring yourself to my location and I will load simunituin ammo into my gun and show you how wrong you are.
I will laugh loudly at the welts you are covered with after losing, so be aware of that.


ETA: I have legally carried a gun daily since 1992 and have NEVER dropped a firearm, loaded or empty.
If you are dropping guns there is a bigger "issue" than if it fires or not.
**** happens.
All I can say.
Glad youve never dropped one.
I have probably will again.
Not perfect by any stretch.
However I have 0 fear of the gun discharging and as mentioned above I do not attempt to catch it.

Oh its not like a frequent event but yeah **** happens.



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I've heard of FN and SIG striker fired pistols going off when dropped/bumped and both companies have been sued, had recalls to replace original parts and made changes to their design over it.

I've not hear of the XD or XDM models having those issues.

I have a couple XDMs and one XD. Never have they failed to feed/chamber/fire/eject as they are supposed to. I wish I had more time to shoot the big XD .45 Tactical.

Get a good secure holster, practice with it, carry with it, enjoy it and hope you never have to really use it to defend yourself. Not because of a fear it won't work, but because of the aftermath of that use on your mind, your family and your wallet.
That is why i got two Sig P220s and the xde all in .45 I don't feel safe with the striker fire guns
 

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I didn't see anyone mention this, but cocked and locked historically and accurately only really describes the 1911, which your XD is not. That's a round in the chamber, the single action trigger cocked, and the safety on, as they were designed and intended to be carried. Also, the CZ75, Browning High Power, and Taurus PT92, can be carried safely in this condition.

Calling a XD pistol cocked and locked would be inaccurate, as they dont have hammers, and dont have safeties. Its just a striker fired pistol.

Yes they are perfectly safe to store loaded with a round in the chamber. I would remind you that this is a very mature platform, approaching 25 years of refinements. Any kinks to the system were worked out years ago.

And yes, the appropriate way to carry it fully loaded, in a proper holster, with a round in the chamber. If you are unsure of that or feel uneasy about it, training in a defensive pistol class will give you the repetition and confidence that its a safe way to do things. I see guys with safes full of guns, thousands and thousands of dollars worth, and they haven't even taken the time to drop $500 on a defensive pistol class, which would have been the best money in firearms they ever spent. Instead their skills suck, and they are not very good with a pistol. A guy with a single gun, that knows how to use it, is far better off than a collector with a safe full of guns with no tactical skills.
 

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Fairly new here and when I saw the title I was somewhat confused as I thought the XD was striker fired. If you have a manual safety, along with a grip safety and safe action trigger then having trouble understanding the concern with carrying with a round in the chamber. The real safety is between your ears so practice safe handling and carrying. Truthfully you are in far more danger without a round in the chamber than you are with the pistol as it was intended to be carried. There is a video on YouTube of a store owner that tries to chamber a round in a SD situation and he and his son are both shot and killed.
 

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I carry my XDE cocked and lock, or use the decocking lever and drop the hammer down to half cocked. Also do the same on my Sig P220
 

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Always w a round chambered.
Sometimes two, just in case.
 
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I have an XD 40 tactical as well. This gun had a grip safety on it that prevents the sear from tripping without being depressed. I have even attempted to manually release the seer through the rear cover plate and it will not disengage without the grip safety being depressed.

The grip safety physically disconnects the trigger, as well as prevents the slide from cycling.

This gun is very safe to carry with a loaded chamber.
 

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My XD .45 5" Tactical has a grip safety and thumb safeties. I read they didn't make a lot of those. Not sure if any other models of XD or XDM were ever made with ambidextrous safeties or not.



All my striker fired guns except the Glock and a couple XDMs have thumb safeties. Consistency in manipulation/operation. Whether I carry a CZ P07 or an FNS .40 or the M&P .45 Compact, operating them is the same. They may be different internally, but the way my hand/fingers/thumbs operate to make it fire is the same.
 

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I've got the XDE and it has the thumb safety /decocker. So when you carry locked and loaded you and carry it like a 1911 or decock it like a Sig P220 so the first round will be double action
 
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