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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen some not clean either one and I've seen some do just the case and I've seen some clean everything and I've seen some polish til real shiny. Handgun reloading by the way.

So what's your advice and the meaning in why you do it your way?

Thanks
 

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For me the purpose of cleaning the cases & primer pockets is to achieve a consistent load. Whether it's a good seating of the primer, bullet, or even a consistent powder charge....that is why I do it. Plus you get to inspect the cases for possible wear or even cracks.

Others will say just deprime, reload, & repeat until the case splits.....probably not the best advice or a best practice, but to each their own.
 

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For me the purpose of cleaning the cases & primer pockets is to achieve a consistent load. Whether it's a good seating of the primer, bullet, or even a consistent powder charge....that is why I do it. Plus you get to inspect the cases for possible wear or even cracks.

Others will say just deprime, reload, & repeat until the case splits.....probably not the best advice or a best practice, but to each their own.
This. I like my brass clean and in good structural condition. Some don't care. meh.
 

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It is a waste of time unless you are shooting competition. The decapping pin cleans the flash hole. That is all that is necessary. IMO
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Those are good reasons to me guys. Have you ever tested them both ways to see if there was a practical performance difference?

I'm gathering that your talking about the reloading consistency?
 

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Those are good reasons to me guys. Have you ever tested them both ways to see if there was a practical performance difference?

I'm gathering that your talking about the reloading consistency?


I've not tested either way. I used to be an oceangoing marine engineer and I like everything clean and in good structural condition. That's just me being me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It is a waste of time unless you are shooting competition. The decapping pin cleans the flash hole. That is all that is necessary. IMO

This is what I'm trying to figure out. I've made up a couple hundred rounds doing nothing to the empties and so far I've not experienced any reloading problems yet. But will I....... or will performance suffer? If so to what degree?
 

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You might get a few FTFeed due to dirty exteriors, but i've been reloading .45 ACP for a long time. sometimes i pick up the brass and toss it right in the hopper to reload, sometimes i put them through some corn cob or walnut media before. I have found though that you sometimes get a powdery buildup that gets compacted in the flash hole making the depriming operation a bit iffy.

I've since moved on to wet washing with stainless steel pins.
 

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When I first started reloading in 1985, I didn't even own a tumbler until 3 years later. Tumbled brass is (nicer to look at) easier to see a crack.
 

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I sort, wet tumble to clean and then throw in a vibratory tumbler with a blend of walnut and corn cob media, nu-finish and a couple dryer sheets to polish. Brass seems to glow and I haven't used a primer pocket cleaner yet.

I have no doubt that I completely over doing it but my personality type doesn't allow me to do differently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Knight..

I'll watch for the primer issue. Thanks

If your shooting dirty powder or light charges then this could cause issues to maybe? The accurate no2 burns pretty clean in my 9mm XDs 3.3
Even the barrel looked really clean.
 

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I have never cleaned a handgun primer pocket, never. In 10s of 1000s of rounds, never had a misfire due to not cleaning primer pockets.
One should never reload dirty brass. It only puts crud into your expensive sizing die. Dirty brass is also diff to inspect for defects. It doesn't have to be factory shiny, but should be free of grit & dirt. A simple wash in hot water will do, add some lemon juice & they actual clean up pretty well. Most of us use a simple dry tumbling method, cheap & easy.
 

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I use a decapper then a couple hours of steel media tumbling and brass comes out looking brand new inside and out. Really clean is what I like but to each his own. Not tumbling would probally produce the same result.
 

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The residue that fall out of the primer hole when decapping makes a mess with my Dillon so I also decap and steel pin clean til they shine before reloading.
 

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I agree with Fred - I clean them because I don't want to screw up my dies or spend time cleaning them when all that can be avoided. I don't mess with pistol primer pockets or flash holes.

I've never had a problem with my handloaded ammo that wasn't attributed to the taper crimp.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I suppose old Lee would've put a primer pocket cleaner on his decapping die if it was a necessity from what I'm hearing. Size-decap-clean.....all in one stroke on that marvelous contraption Lee calls a classic four hole turret press. Let me tell you son.....that's a cool machine. I like it.
 

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I never cleaned any primer pockets either. And like Fred and GT have never suffered any ill effects to my ammo because of the lack. Many of my cases have been fired more than a half dozen times and some over 10 times, but they keep on chugging along. I absolutely DO tumble my brass to a fair shine because I don't want crud in my dies or guns and they both seem to run better because of that. The less grit and goo you bring to the reloading bench or firing line can only increase the life of your equipment.
 
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