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I always lean toward the oddballs, no matter what I get, and the Chiappa Rhino seams to be the oddest of them all in the revolver world.

Anyone here have one? are they small enough for CC (is it worth getting the 2" version) or should I just stick with a longer barrel version if it ever happens?
 

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I always lean toward the oddballs, no matter what I get, and the Chiappa Rhino seams to be the oddest of them all in the revolver world.

Anyone here have one? are they small enough for CC (is it worth getting the 2" version) or should I just stick with a longer barrel version if it ever happens?
Well, my buddy bought one and ive shot it...there is no recoil....for being 357.. Now as for Carry,you can as the Gun come with a custom made holster...It's OWB so if you want IWB you have to get a univeral or have one made...
 

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I saw these a while back and thought they were interesting. And I have had the "want a new gun" bug for a while and I was just looking these up online for pricing. Was going to check with the local gun stores to see about ordering one.

Anyways, check YouTube, lots of reviews on there.
 

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I've never shot one, but I appreciate that someone out there is taking a fresh perspective on things when it comes to firearm's engineering. But man I think they're ugly.
 

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They are so ugly, they are cool. I would love to try one....
 

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I would be interested in trying one to see how the design helps to tame recoil. I guess I would be focused on the target and not looking at the gun itself anyway.
 

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1) The design of the Rhino won't reduce the recoil, the Physics of F=M * A is still in play. The only effect is that the recoil forces will be redirected in a force line closer to the line of the wrist joint. While it will probably take 20 years or more of shooting one, I have a sneaking hunch that long term use may lead to permanent wrist injuries.

2) Based on appearance the Sight Line looks to be about 1.5 to 2 inches above the Bore Axis. As a result the Sight Line and Bore Axis will converge at the distance that the gun is sighted in at. As a result, it will shoot low at close range and high at some ranges longer than the sighting point. I've shot revolvers with rail mounted sights and found the convergence effects made them unsuitable for precision shooting at distances that varied to much from the zero point.

Personally, I'll pass on the Rhino. Not only is it uglier than a Hi Point but I have enough wrist issues already and the convergence in the sighting would just bug the hell out of me.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
1) The design of the Rhino won't reduce the recoil, the Physics of F=M * A is still in play. The only effect is that the recoil forces will be redirected in a force line closer to the line of the wrist joint. While it will probably take 20 years or more of shooting one, I have a sneaking hunch that long term use may lead to permanent wrist injuries.

2) Based on appearance the Sight Line looks to be about 1.5 to 2 inches above the Bore Axis. As a result the Sight Line and Bore Axis will converge at the distance that the gun is sighted in at. As a result, it will shoot low at close range and high at some ranges longer than the sighting point. I've shot revolvers with rail mounted sights and found the convergence effects made them unsuitable for precision shooting at distances that varied to much from the zero point.

Personally, I'll pass on the Rhino. Not only is it uglier than a Hi Point but I have enough wrist issues already and the convergence in the sighting would just bug the hell out of me.

I'd think a twisting motion of an off center force would do far more damage to a questionable wrist than a directed force. My wrists are crap (easily become injured) compared to my grip and arm strength, but If I keep everything in-line, I have no problems at all.

wouldn't the sight convergence actually help at the real long ranges and only have it 1.5" off close up?
 

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I love the idea of these things, i just wish they made a little bigger grip. I just cant seem to get a solid grip onto the ones they have now.
 

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check out what Massad Ayoob has to say in his book The Complete Book of Handguns (magazine $11.95)
3 shot group .75 5 shot group 1.30 @ 25Yards with MagTeck Gold 125GR JHP 357 loads with a 2inch barrel He's buying that gun.
 

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I'd think a twisting motion of an off center force would do far more damage to a questionable wrist than a directed force. My wrists are crap (easily become injured) compared to my grip and arm strength, but If I keep everything in-line, I have no problems at all.

wouldn't the sight convergence actually help at the real long ranges and only have it 1.5" off close up?
Know any runners in their 50's and 60's? Ask them how many times they've had their knees done. While the loads involved are much different, I have a suspicion that a direct linear impact on the joints in the wrist will do more damage that a rotary motion caused by muzzle flip. Since it may take 20 or 30 years for the effects to become clear I may not live to see my suspicions confirmed. However, to me it just seems "unnatural" and just a bit "wrong".

As for the effect of the convergence, it depends on the distance the gun is sighted for and it's intended use. Sight a 22 caliber revolver with a converging sight at 30 feet and you'll find it will completely clear a 12 inch target at 100 feet. On a revolver used for squirrel hunting a converging sight setup is a royal PITA. Now, in a 357 Magnum sighted for 25 yards and used for defense, shooting 2 inches low at 20 feet doesn't amount to a small mound of beans. However, even if intended for that purpose, you're still going to want to hit the bullseye at the range, which means you burn up a lot of ammo learning how to shoot with a "compensated" sight picture or you end up selling the gun because it's too much work.

As I've said, I've shot with rail mounted sights on revolvers and I regard convergence as being too much of a bother. About the only time I mount a scope on one my revolvers is when I have the ''itch" to try and shoot quarters at 50 yards or am curious about how close a new gun can come to doing that. Otherwise I'll either shoot with irons or use a J Point reflex.
 

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Oh good gracious. It operates on the same principle as an assault rifle, putting the bore in line with the point of contact on the shoulder for less muzzle rise on firing. Has that proven to cause injury? How much do you think a few, or few hundred, or even a few thousand impacts from a .357 is really going to do to your wrist? Even if it does, isn't it worth the risk for a better followup shot in an emergency? If your wife or child's life is at stake? I want one, maybe in a 4" barrel; not much into snubbies. Does everyone have to pick every innovation apart?
 

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I have high remarks for the Rhino.

‪Shot Show 2011 Nick Rhino‬‏ - YouTube

‪Shot Show 2011 Joanna Rhino‬‏ - YouTube

Watch my wifes last pull of the trigger on a spent cartridge. The Revolver shot so well even with full HD loads she did not jerk the trigger.
‪Shot Show 2011‬‏ - YouTube

Notice on mine I was able to double tap the steel after a couple rounds, it was that easy to learn how to feel this revolver.
‪Shot Show 2011‬‏ - YouTube

‪Shot Show 2011 media day Rhino Revolver‬‏ - YouTube
 

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I have been very interested in the 6" nickel plated version of this revolver, but have not been able to find it anywhere and Chiappa has been less then helpful. I have two dealers who have been searching the country for me with no results. One of the dealers called me yesterday and was told Chiappa would not be making any more of the nickel plated 6" guns in 2012. For all their advertising, sponsorships and bold claims about their guns they appear to be a fly by night company.
 

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I bought one and have had a bad experience. It lives up to the promise of lower rise in Recoil. If I use any quality of .357's the spent casings stick in the cylinder. This gun won't cycle properly. I can't imagine using it in a defense situation where I might have to reload.

This issue does not happen with 38's. They cycle fine. I didn't buy the gun for 38's. I bought it for the advertised .357.

The problem is compounded by Chiappa not answering their phones nor responding to their web site/e-mail method of communicating with them. This is the poorest of customer service.

I would not recommend one of these guns due to their non responsive customer service.
 

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It seems that the recoil hitting your wrist and then grinding it upward would put more stress for the simple fact that it puts the load over smaller areas of the joint. Ether way it should not make any real difference. I was wondering if you could just make the sight go straight up and aim high. For instance instead of aiming at the x aim at the 10 or the line of the ring etc. to make up the 2 inches. So has anyone ever done that on different guns like the previous poster mentioned. Finally the gun is about as ugly as it can get. It is sad that it shoots good but no one will buy it for that. It probably won't help if there customer service is bad.
 

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I bought one and have had a bad experience. It lives up to the promise of lower rise in Recoil. If I use any quality of .357's the spent casings stick in the cylinder. This gun won't cycle properly. I can't imagine using it in a defense situation where I might have to reload.

This issue does not happen with 38's. They cycle fine. I didn't buy the gun for 38's. I bought it for the advertised .357.

The problem is compounded by Chiappa not answering their phones nor responding to their web site/e-mail method of communicating with them. This is the poorest of customer service.

I would not recommend one of these guns due to their non responsive customer service.

I called Chiappa to the carpet on the Handgun Magazine website that they never answer their customer e-mails and they finally responded on that forum. They said "we have no record of any e-mails coming in from our website, are you sure you have our correct e-mail address" and then listed the exact address that I had sent 3 previous messages to. These guys suck, if the Italian manufacturer knew how poorly they were being represented by Chiappa, they would most likely pull their distribution license.
 

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I picked one up the other day just to look at it since it was so odd looking. The flat sided cylinder certainly made the gun slimmer. I was looking at what .357 revolvers fit my handgun safe since I am getting a lot of requests from .357 owners. I have pretty big hands and also noted how small the grip was. I'm sure so it could be carried easier along with the cylinder design. The material the grip is made of seemed to be very soft which might help a little with the felt recoil. I like the innovation and if it's not reliable I hope they get there.
 
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