Springfield XD Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,148 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
These are just a few changes that I think would vastly improve the M. I know this will never happen, but I can hope! One; go back to the standard slide stop and move it forward on the frame. If you are coming from the 1911 world (as many XD shooters are), you want to put your thumb right on top of that flared slide lock because that is where the safety should be. This is one case where a novice shooter actually has an edge on an experienced 1911 shooter. This can obviously be overcome with training. But, it is a pain to fight decades of muscle memory. Two; move the take down lever to the right side of the pistol. This will get it out of the way for 95% of the shooters and take care of any heat issues. Three; make the trigger out of plastic. This will take care of any heat issues. Everything else is fine. I can take care of sights, trigger jobs, and grip stippling myself. I do believe if Springfield made those three changes, they would have a much better pistol.

ranburr
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,581 Posts
Can't argue about the slide stop, I am not a 1911 shooter and have had to work on keeping my thumb away from it. I first I thought that making it less prominent would help but I have found the nearly recessed slide lock on my Sig presents the same issue.

As for the takedown lever, the current location really doesn't bother me. If they moved it to the opposite side perhaps S.A. could mold a thumb rest into the frame for the support hand thumb because that is what I currently do, use the takedown lever as a grip reference for my thumb.

As for the plastic trigger idea, NO WAY NO HOW. Plastics may be tough nowadays but you will never convince me that they are as good as metal in this application. If your shooting enough that the trigger is too hot to touch, wear gloves or let the gun cool down. After all, it's not a water cooled machine gun, it's a tupperware pistol and getting it hot enough that you can't touch the trigger may be a hint that it's time to give it a rest.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,089 Posts
One; go back to the standard slide stop and move it forward on the frame. If you are coming from the 1911 world (as many XD shooters are), you want to put your thumb right on top of that flared slide lock because that is where the safety should be. This is one case where a novice shooter actually has an edge on an experienced 1911 shooter. This can obviously be overcome with training. But, it is a pain to fight decades of muscle memory.
I disagree. I like it where it is because it does what it is supposed to do, allow the firer to release the slide without rotating the hand. Most 1911 shooters that I shoot with rack the slide whereas other shooters normally use the mag release. In competition and in RWS, using the slide release is faster. This pistol is not designed to be shot like a 1911 and IMHO would not be better off. It does take some practice to not press in with the right thumb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
I disagree. I like it where it is because it does what it is supposed to do, allow the firer to release the slide without rotating the hand. Most 1911 shooters rack the slide. Poly shooters use the mag release. In competition and in RWS, using the slide release if faster. This pistol is not designed to be shot like a 1911 and IMHO would not be better off. It does take some practice to not press in with the right thumb.
I hope this does not come back to haunt me, (;)) but I agree with ranburr on two out of three of his suggestions. I do however want to keep my metal trigger. My XD(M) has been sent back to SA under warranty concerns, but I wonder what type of metal the trigger is made from. I it is steel then a change to aluminum may help to dissipate heat faster.

Poly vs. Metal (it makes no difference)

In competition I agree the slide release is faster to use. Every competition shooter I see using a 1911 uses the slide release as well.

But in non-competition, for self defense reasons, if you train/practice with multiple handguns, then racking the slide is the preferred way to do it. It practically guarantees that the round will, if needed, be cleared and a new one chambered. This also does not rely on the need of minor motion skills when under pressure. Furthermore, the small changes from one weapon to another will slow a person that has trained themselves to use the slide release because it is slightly different between weapons.... where as racking the slide is the same movement/location on every handgun.

/tg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
The only thing I would change would be the mag release. It seems to be hard to press and seems to stick a bit. This seems to be normal for the XDm series of pistols.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
I personally wouldn't make any of those changes. I like my metal trigger, the takedown lever works fine for me where it is, and (as already mentioned) Emergency Action Drills would have you cycle the slide manually rather than use the slide catch. If you keep the muscle memory of racking the slide, it will transition to all semi-auto pistols! ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
The only thing I would change would be the mag release. It seems to be hard to press and seems to stick a bit. This seems to be normal for the XDm series of pistols.
a little lubde fixed this for me....on the spring inside the magwell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,148 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
and (as already mentioned) Emergency Action Drills would have you cycle the slide manually rather than use the slide catch. If you keep the muscle memory of racking the slide, it will transition to all semi-auto pistols! ;)
I don't use the slide stop. The problem with it is the location has it right under your strong hand thumb just as the take down lever is under your weak hand thumb.

ranburr
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top