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When at home alone, I practice drawing, quickly aiming, then dryfire at objects. Trying to build muscle memory. I feel quite silly to tell the truth, This is why I do only when at home alone. Do you guys do this.
 

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I believe it is a must, before you start carrying.
Just make sure you have proper training. Practice that. Then go back for more training. There is a good chance on your return to training you may be doing something wrong. Slight small bad habits you don't want, can appear.
 

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Practice makes perfect isn't it?

Repeating a certain body movement over time (10,000 repetitions or more) will result to long term muscle memory eventually allowing it to be performed without conscious effort.

I used to dry fire my XD9 a lot the first couple of weeks I got it. No more than 15-20 minutes a day. I don't find it silly when you take time in practice especially if you have plans of joining a competition.

Good luck!
 

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I'm do to go back for more training.
The wife goes with me. Actually i'm taking her, thinking she needs the training/practice. They give her a break after awhile, and throw me in there just to fill in the time.
I do better than average, but they always find something that needs improved.
Its a place with simutators, well worth the money.
 

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Yes, but rarely at home, and often times with live ammo, and a bang ;)

Don't ever be embarrassed to practice things that might save your life ;) ;)

I practice such things in the desert ... No range, as many won't allow that kind of practice, anyway.
 

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Yes. All the time. At home with ammo in a completely separate room. Practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect.
 

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If you don't do that, then you are selling yourself short. Every expert I have read agrees that this is a must do. I am in the midst of reading "Modern Day Gunslinger", and the author also advocates it. I know that anyone who sees you doing it is going to think you are playing cowboy, but then again, you should not do it when there are two things in the same room with you and your thoroughly checked gun that you know that you know that you know is empty...and that is other people, and ammo. Fire at a safe backstop, and then put that backstop away before you reload.

And if you spend a little bit of time thinking you are a cowboy, well, more power to ya! :rolleyes:
 

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My ranges don't allow draws or rapid fire so the only way I can practice the draw and reloads is dry fire. Yes, it can't replicate the recoil and the feel of slide lock, but it's a hell of a lot better than nothing. Practice on my friend.
 

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I don't think that's a silly thing to do. Like you said, muscle memory is a very good thing and something you won't be able to buy to protect yourself/home/family like the gun you are practicing with.

Now this may sounds even more silly then just practicing the dry-firing/drawing. I practice from being in the bed to opening my safe to access the gun, and moving about with out making obvious noises, and aiming at spots where an intruder is likely to be at around about the house.

Just another way of building muscle memory my way, not every situation is going to be the same, but if you have a home defense gun, getting to know how you should go about using it to defend the house is not a bad idea.
 

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Any practice is good practice.

I like dry fire and one shot drills. I also shoot a bunch of 22lr.
 

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Any practice is good practice.

I like dry fire and one shot drills. I also shoot a bunch of 22lr.
proper practice is good practice.
you can practice bad habits just as easily as good habits.
I go back to the officers that have been killed because they shot their 6 shots out of the revolver and stopped to put the empties in their pocket just like they did on the range. You dont wanna fire one shot, rack your slide and start to put your gun up in the middle of a fight.
 

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Practice is the mother of Skill
 

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Repitition is the mother of all learning, according to a college professor freind. I use snap caps. Usually 3-4x a week MINIMUM for no more than about 20 minutes. Sight alignment, sight picture, breathing, trigger control, etc. I use totally different mags for snap caps so I dont have to load/unload my carry mags every time
 

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I do at least every other evening and range time my last mag is draw from concealment and shoot one shot at a time.. TDI, where I took several classes recommends that you have dry fire trigger time every day from concealment. I'm lucky to get once a month shooting time it's usually once every two.
 

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We have a TV commercial for an alarm system company that runs on the same morning news program every weekday. It's ridiculous.

Many versions, but they all have the same theme. A woman is at home on an exercise bike, wearing headphones, and a bad guy smashes the glass in her French doors. Instantly, the alarm goes off, she screams, the alarm company calls her, the intruder flees, and she converses with the company representative. "Stay on the line. The police are on their way.", says the rep.

"Oh, thank you.", says the woman.

I have nothing against alarm systems. But this series of advertisements makes a great test for reaction time. Many mornings, with a double cleared and checked XD.40SC, I will watch the TV news show while getting ready for the day. When I hear the glass breaking, I draw, sight, and dry fire my weapon. I have yet to beat the phone call on the commercial.

Yes, practice does not make perfect....Perfect practice makes perfect.

My first instructor gave me some great advice, "Practice drawing and dry firing 15 minutes a day. It's better and oh so much less expensive than the weekly range trip. Always remember this......Slow is smooth. Smooth is fast. That's what we want, a smooth draw."

It is amazing how quickly dry firing can increase a person's abilities.

Yet........I still can't beat the phone call!!
 

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I don't think that's a silly thing to do. Like you said, muscle memory is a very good thing and something you won't be able to buy to protect yourself/home/family like the gun you are practicing with.

Now this may sounds even more silly then just practicing the dry-firing/drawing. I practice from being in the bed to opening my safe to access the gun, and moving about with out making obvious noises, and aiming at spots where an intruder is likely to be at around about the house.

Just another way of building muscle memory my way, not every situation is going to be the same, but if you have a home defense gun, getting to know how you should go about using it to defend the house is not a bad idea.
That doesn't sound at all silly. It would be silly to think that one would be able to do these things under the stress of a real life situation without having practiced it until it was instinctual. Even better would be to drill with the other people in the household so everybody knows the plan to follow when something happens and can follow it without hesitation.
 

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To always be safe and not harm yourself or anyone in the neighborhood, there are good specific ways to dry fire. I posted these once before.

Dry Fire Rules

1. Set a reasonable time limit for the dry fire practice session. 10-15 minutes is optimal. 30 minutes in one session is max for beneficial effort.
2. Designate a dry fire area. Dry fire should only be done in that area.
3. Unload your weapon. Unload all magazines and ammunition carriers.
4. Put all ammo in another room. NO AMMO EVER IN DRY FIRE AREA!
5. Place dry fire target in such a manner that a negligent discharge would be captured. Dry fire targets should only be displayed during practice. Do not use TV images as dry fire targets as this violates rule 5 and 8.
6. Present weapon. Point in a safe direction and recheck to make positive the weapon is empty. Double check magazines and ammo carriers. Triple check.
7. You are now mentally ready for Dry Fire Practice Session. Concentrate on the dry fire practice drills and avoid all distractions. If you experience a distraction, such as a phone call, knock on the door, or a question from someone in the room etc. immediately cease dry fire practice. If you decide to continue, you must return to step 1 and proceed through all the steps.
8. After the last dry fire practice drill is complete, you must mentally leave dry fire practice. Put away the target. Leave the dry fire area and say out loud-“I have completed my dry fire practice”. The session is over!!! DO NOT ALLOW YOURSELF TO SAY OR THINK “ONE MORE TIME”!!!!!!!!!!!
9. Place your weapon in the condition of your choice and review the four safety rules.
1. Treat all guns as if they are loaded!
2. Never point a gun at anything you are not willing to destroy.
3. Keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot.
4. Be sure of your target and what is behind it.


If using an outomatic, simulate second shots or only practice one shot from a draw. Raking the slide to cock the hammer should only be done during the re-holster action. All things done during dry fire will become habit; during a gun fight raking after every shot only empties the magazine faster.
 
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