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Hello,

I am contemplating getting in to the reloading aspect of shooting (like everyone else lately it seems), and I'm looking at the Lee Turret Press Deluxe Kit. It references Carbide dies, but I can't seem to find out what the difference is between carbide dies, and just dies.

Can someone help me out here? Thanks!
 

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The only thing carbide in a die set is a ring of carbide in the sizing die. This allows you to not NEED case lube but some guys still lube the cases. It is well worth the slight extra cost. I don't lube service pistol cases, they are short enough & friction isn't that high. I do lube the longer magnum cases for easier sizing but it isn't required.
 

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i dont know how the reloading press works, but in machining carbide is a lot more durable than steel,
 

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We used carbide dies in our Dillons at school for 9, 40, 45, and 44. We never lube our cases. I'll always make sure that I have carbide dies not, simply because I've never had to lube cases before, and I'll probably think it is a pain by comparison.
 

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i dont know how the reloading press works, but in machining carbide is a lot more durable than steel,
Same in reloading. The carbide sizer will not wear or embed anything that will eventually scratch your cases. I just wish they made them for rifles but the carbide insert would be really long & very expensive.
 

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Carbide dies for straight walled cases (standard pistol cartridges) do not require case lube. Steel dies do. A little lube, such as the spray lubes like Hornady One-Shot, will smooth up the whole process even more but it is not necessary. For bottleneck cases (rifle cartridges) carbide dies still require lube. Carbide dies have a carbide insert that performs the resizing action. Carbide is harder than steel so one word of caution is to NOT adjust your sizer die to where it compresses on the shell holder/plate or you take the chance of breaking the carbide ring.

If you are loading pistol rounds all steel dies make no sense at all. Carbide (or similar) is the only way to go. Good luck!
 

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Carbide dies for straight walled cases (standard pistol cartridges) do not require case lube. Steel dies do. A little lube, such as the spray lubes like Hornady One-Shot, will smooth up the whole process even more but it is not necessary. For bottleneck cases (rifle cartridges) carbide dies still require lube. Carbide dies have a carbide insert that performs the resizing action. Carbide is harder than steel so one word of caution is to NOT adjust your sizer die to where it compresses on the shell holder/plate or you take the chance of breaking the carbide ring.

If you are loading pistol rounds all steel dies make no sense at all. Carbide (or similar) is the only way to go. Good luck!

WyoXD is correct in his assessment of carbide vrs. non carbide dies. Spend a bit more for the carbide if they are available in the caliber you need. I never lube straight walled pistol brass that I reload through my Dillon dies, never! I use Dillon carbide 9mm, 45 ACP, and .223. I did have a self inflicted problem with the .223 and Dillon cheerfully supplied repair parts free of charge, Truly a no BS warranty!
 

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I have .44, .40, 9mm, .367/38 carbide dies and have never had to lube a case.
 

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well worth it in my opinion. I still use some lube on a case every 50 or so rounds just to reduce friction and keep things smooth, but they work well.
 

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I load .41 mag., 9mm, and .380. All my dies are carbide and I have never lubed a case. My .41 dies have loaded close to 10,000 rounds by now and are still like new . I will always go with carbide dies. Hornady (I think ) makes Titanium Nitride dies that are supposed to do the same thing.
 

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I load .41 mag., 9mm, and .380. All my dies are carbide and I have never lubed a case. My .41 dies have loaded close to 10,000 rounds by now and are still like new . I will always go with carbide dies. Hornady (I think ) makes Titanium Nitride dies that are supposed to do the same thing.

Ahh titanium Nitride coatings. We use that coating on our compressor rotor and compressor stator blades in our turbine engines. I guess the process is so bad for your health that the only places we can get TiNitride coated T64 blades is Russia. Spousedly the process isn't allowed to be done in the US.
 

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Well I would use nothing but carbide dies for straight wall cases. I have never had to lube a case. Save's time and mess.
 

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Ahh titanium Nitride coatings. We use that coating on our compressor rotor and compressor stator blades in our turbine engines. I guess the process is so bad for your health that the only places we can get TiNitride coated T64 blades is Russia. Spousedly the process isn't allowed to be done in the US.
Hmm, I could have sworn that was what they used. Perhaps they are no longer made. I'm sure they weren't carbide though. Oh well, I have Lyman and RCBS carbide dies so no matter!
 

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but I can't seem to find out what the difference is between carbide dies, and just dies.
For your purposes, you want carbide for straight walled pistol cartridges. Lee is fine, and inexpensive.

Look at the bottom of the sizing die -- with carbide, you will see a separate ring there. That is the carbide ring, that does the actual sizing.

and I'm looking at the Lee Turret Press Deluxe Kit.
Take a look at the Classic Turret -- almost every bit of internet hearsay (aka pooled ignorance, YMMV) says that it is quite good.
 

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Hmm, I could have sworn that was what they used. Perhaps they are no longer made. I'm sure they weren't carbide though. Oh well, I have Lyman and RCBS carbide dies so no matter!
It very well could have been. I'm just saying that the process that is used to TiN coat things is from what I've heard at work done in Russia where OSHA doesn't really exist.:eek:

I know a lot of AR mauf. offer TiN coated bolts for 80 bucks extra. The regular phosphate coated bolt has been doing fine since the late 60s so I think I'll stick with that.
 

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Carbide Dies differ alot from steel dies. Steel Dies will have very less life, will need constant repolishing and lubrication as compared to carbide dies. Carbide is very very hard , and thus will give very good surface finish and require no or little lubrication.
For bulk machining carbide dies should be preferred as compared to steel dies.
 

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Carbide Dies differ alot from steel dies. Steel Dies will have very less life, will need constant repolishing and lubrication as compared to carbide dies. Carbide is very very hard , and thus will give very good surface finish and require no or little lubrication.
For bulk machining carbide dies should be preferred as compared to steel dies.
I doubt a reloader ever wears out a quality steel die reloading. Feed them lean brass, you don't have to polish them either. Carbide is the only way to go for sure, but since 99.9% of all rifle dies are steel, they work fine with just a little care.
 
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