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^ Apparently it didn't like my description of rural residents, beginning with a color and ending with a body part connecting the head to the torso...... :lol:

More, tomorrow. :)
 

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I haven't tried my cheap laser sight with my XD9 yet. I worked with it a little bit on my P22 and took it to the indoor range once. I haven't really embraced it yet because it's only a $40 unit. But again, just dipping my toe. ;)
With the laser, I think the biggest thing to get a feel for is how you like the different zero options.

As long as that unit is able to retain its zero, you can easily practice all three zeros properly. :)

When "re-charging" the luminescence you don't want to look into that same bright light because it will ruin your low-light vision. Back in my skydiving days I was studying up for a Class D license. I had my C license and, beside the written test, needed a night jump as one of the qualifications. In talking about it with the other skydivers one guy told me his story; After jumping all day they were relaxing after sunset waiting for dark, wearing sunglasses in the dark to get their pupils to open up even more for their night jump. Once they got to altitude they all took off their sunglasses as they readied to jump. Just then the videographer turned on his big camera light to film the exit and the freefall. It totally destroyed the "night vision" the jumpers had been working on all evening. Thankfully the jump went OK but the skydivers were pretty sore at the video guy. He could've waited until after the exit. Oops.

I'll have another look at my little glow-dots in a minute and try to figure out how long they remain visible/usable after a "charge". But in the short time I've experimented with it, I'm already thinking this will not be a permanent solution.
There's a lot to experiment with, in terms of low-light solutions. And just like the example you cited, a lot of it does cross-over to other sports/activities as well, as there's a lot of hard data in terms of vision science. However, as you saw in the old Handgun Magazine article about the thumbs-forward grip, the devil is in the details, and there are things that you will want to explore for yourself, under the guidance of those how know and can show you -properly- the advantages and pitfalls of various tools and techniques.

Towards the latter, as you start to seek low-light instruction (and ALL defensive firearms or integrated combatives), ask yourself how you may or may not be able to apply the techniques taught by the instructor, given the framework of your life and your needs. For example, the techniques employed by a lone undercover law-enforcement officer or an intelligence operative in hostile territory may be considerably different versus of a special-forces soldier or SWAT operator who has the immediate support of his team-mates. Similarly, the needs of a homeowner living in the countryside with expansive property lines will have tremendous difference versus those of an urban apartment dweller - to say nothing of differences in state-to-state use-of-force legalities.
 

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Discussion Starter · #163 ·
Hi,

With the laser, I think the biggest thing to get a feel for is how you like the different zero options.

As long as that unit is able to retain its zero, you can easily practice all three zeros properly. :)
I zeroed the P22 at seven yards, sort of, I eye-balled it. I took a quick look at a tutorial and made some rough adjustments. I didn't use it enough to see if it held zero. If I put it on the XD I think I would like a parallel zero. One of these days I'll be able to spend some quality time with it.


There's a lot to experiment with, in terms of low-light solutions...
I tell you what, this Glow-On paint just will not do. I took my pistol outside for a few minutes to get some real sunlight on it. Then it looked great in a dark closet. When I checked it again less than two hours later, nothing. Well, that's $13 that'll go into my granddaughters' craft supplies. I'm sure they'll get a kick out of it. :D


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 

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I zeroed the P22 at seven yards, sort of, I eye-balled it. I took a quick look at a tutorial and made some rough adjustments. I didn't use it enough to see if it held zero. If I put it on the XD I think I would like a parallel zero. One of these days I'll be able to spend some quality time with it.
So much to do, so little time! :)

I tell you what, this Glow-On paint just will not do. I took my pistol outside for a few minutes to get some real sunlight on it. Then it looked great in a dark closet. When I checked it again less than two hours later, nothing. Well, that's $13 that'll go into my granddaughters' craft supplies. I'm sure they'll get a kick out of it. :D
Sadly, win some, lose some. :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #165 ·
Seasons Greetings!

I hope everyone has had a wonderful Christmas celebration. I just wanted to share my favorite gifts. My daughter gave me an EDC light and Mrs. BassCliff gave me an EDC knife.



The Streamlight MicroStream may not be suitable for most tactical situations (only 45 lumens) but it will be a very handy pocket flashlight for light duty use. It has a two-way clip so that it can be attached to the bill of my cap. The Buck 285 Bantam will be a versatile carry knife for everyday tasks. Both will clip inside my pocket. I feel loved. :)

I hope all of you have been blessed as richly as I have. Merry Christmas.


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 

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Discussion Starter · #166 ·
Hi,

Of course, always know your local laws and ordinances. Here is a general guideline on what to do if you happen to be pulled over by LEO while you're CCW-ing. Number one: Stay Calm! Number two: Keep your hands in plain sight, perhaps on the steering wheel. Then when asked for license and registration, perhaps include your CCW permit card too. Stay calm and follow instructions.


I have not been pulled over while carrying but I have had an LEO interaction. Here we are supposed to inform the officer that we are carrying. My officer said, "Cool" and that was it.

Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
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Discussion Starter · #167 ·
Hi,

I've never heard it called "Israeli Carry".

I know this topic has been discussed ad nauseam here in the forum. I received this article in my email from CCW Safe and it more or less confirms why I carry a round in the chamber. I take training sessions and practice regularly. My pistol is "drop safe". I am confident, due to the internal safeties, grip safety, and the trigger being covered in my holster, that I won't have a negligent discharge. Plus, in this reduced capacity state, I like having that extra round in the chamber. Who knows? Eleven bullets just might come in handy some day. :)

By Steve Moses, from: ISRAELI CARRY: YAY OR NAY? - CCW Safe National | CCW Safe Weapon Liability | CCW Safe Defense Attorneys

Israeli Carry: Yay or Nay?

“Israeli Carry” is a term commonly used when concealed carriers holster-carry their semi-automatic handguns with a loaded magazine and empty chamber. Advocates have stated that carrying a handgun in such a condition is safer because it lessens the chances that the carrier will experience an unintended discharge (often referred to as a “negligent” discharge).

I do not think this method of carry originated with the Israelis. W.E. Fairbain and E.A Sykes (authors of the book “Shooting to Live” published in 1942) were early proponents of carrying a semi-automatic pistol with a full magazine inserted into the pistol and empty chamber. Fairbain and Sykes played a significant role in training the Shanghai Municipal Police in the 1930’s as well as Allied troops during World War II, and from the best that I can tell it was common for both Allied and Axis troops to carry their pistols without a round in the chamber except for those times in which imminent action was possible or anticipated. It is possible that the reason this method of carry is often referred to as “Israeli Carry” is because initially the equipment that the newly formed Israeli Defense Force used was a hodge-podge of cast-off equipment from the armies on both sides in World War II. It makes sense that the Israelis may have standardized their handgun training at one time given the variety of handguns in their possession whose methods of operation might vary significantly. Not only does this method work with all semi-automatic pistols but it lessens the chance that an unintended discharge might occur if the user had not been well-trained in their use.

Is Israeli Carry recommended for concealed carry? My opinion is that it is not. Speed, surprise, and violence of action may be the only thing that a concealed carrier can effectively employ in order to protect themselves or their loved ones in the event they are attacked by another person who is intent on seriously injuring or killing them and has the means and opportunity to do so. I would like to see our students be able to consistently draw their handguns from concealment and hit a 3” by 5” inch card at fifteen feet in two seconds or less. The ability to do this along with some understanding on how to manage a dangerous encounter so that a sudden draw catches the attacker completely off-guard has a good chance of succeeding.

But what happens if I add a step and must now take the time to rack the slide with my support hand or by shoving the rear sight against my holster, belt, or even a tabletop? First, it takes up precious time that I might not have. Second, by adding one more step there is one more opportunity for a time-eating fumble. And third, what if my support hand is not free? It is entirely possible that I might need to first shove a loved one out of the line of fire or that I have become entangled with my attacker, and they have grabbed my wrist or I need to have that hand free to keep them from accessing a concealed weapon, being stabbed, or punched in the head and rendered unconscious. It is obvious that concealed carriers who carry their pistols this way will definitely need more time to get their concealed handgun from the holster into a position where they could make an accurate shot, and that extra time may be all that is needed for an armed criminal offender to overcome any initial surprise and then start shooting. A fact that I find sobering is that an armed criminal offender who does not care what he or she hits is capable of firing four rounds in my direction in about one second.

While I agree that if dropped on a hard surface, a pistol in Israeli Carry mode will not fire, the same is true for most modern-day good quality semi-automatic pistols. There are indeed some older handguns that do not have internal safeties that might fire if dropped on a hard surface. Concealed carriers might be well-served to do some research in order to ensure that their handgun has been deemed drop-safe.

Concealed carriers who believe that the reason that Israeli Carry is better for them is because they don’t trust themselves to carry a fully loaded handgun may need to ask themselves why. In many instances the solution is to simply get training from a professional instructor. A concealed carrier who knows and ALWAYS abides by the four rules of gun safety is not likely to have an inadvertent discharge. This is even more true when he or she knows how to physically handle handguns in a proper manner. I highly recommend seeking defensive handgun training from a qualified instructor as there is a world of difference between recreational shooting and carrying a concealed handgun because someday that tool may be needed to save our life.

Concealed carriers willing to take lessons and practice but who are still uncomfortable with carrying a handgun with a round in the chamber might take comfort in carrying a double-action/single-action pistol or double-action revolver instead of striker-fired pistol or single-action semi-automatic pistol equipped with an external safety. The longer and typically heavier initial trigger pull might be all that it takes for a concealed carrier to become comfortable with carrying a handgun with a chambered round. Regardless of the handgun type and action selected, it is strict adherence to firearm safety rules and proper gunhandling skills that prevent inadvertent discharges.
-----------------------End Quote----------------------------------------


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
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a bit off topic of EDC, but I noted you have the "speed diamond" sights on your edc friend... how do you like those sights? They are in the top 3 of what I will consider when ready to change over sights. Have you had enough time on range to figure out if they work better for you than other more traditional sights? Let us know ....Thanks!
 
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Discussion Starter · #169 ·
Hi,

a bit off topic of EDC, but I noted you have the "speed diamond" sights on your edc friend... how do you like those sights? They are in the top 3 of what I will consider when ready to change over sights. Have you had enough time on range to figure out if they work better for you than other more traditional sights? Let us know ....Thanks!
You can see my initial review of these SpeedSights here: BassCliff's new SpeedSights on XD9

These old eyes like these sights much better than the stock dots on posts. Instead of "equal light, equal height", I can just line up the corners of the diamonds and Bob's your uncle. The only thing I regret about these sights is that I did not get tritium on front and rear, only on the front sight. But I've gotten really comfortable with these sights and they work well as long as I don't jerk the trigger. ;)

For my next pistol I'm considering the SpeedSights with tritium all the way around (I really like the diamonds), or the TruGlo TFO sights. If I'm not mistaken those are both tritium and fiber optic. I have fiber optic front sights on two of my pistols and really like those, easy for these old eyes to see. 🤓


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
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Discussion Starter · #170 ·
Hi,

At my range trip last weekend: BassCliff BassCliff's 26th Range Report, LCFL Skill... ...

...someone asked me how long I'd been taking this class. I told him I document all my training and I'd have to check my log. The other students said things like "I used to keep a log" or "I should keep a log too". My instructor was a bit concerned about documenting all my training. He was worried about the legal aspect, that it could be used against me. I explained that I keep a log of my training so, if the worst should happen, I can show a lawyer, judge, or jury that I'm not a vigilante who went out and bought a gun so I could go shoot a bad guy. NO, I'm a responsible, trained, law-abiding, legally armed citizen with the ability to defend myself and loved ones in an extreme circumstance.

I document the type of firearms used, location, type of training or practice, specific drills performed, and round count. In the discussion below Rob and Phillip also talk about documenting the weather conditions, the clothing practiced with (coats, gloves, etc), IFAK training, hand-to-hand defense training, non-lethal deterrents (pepper spray), etc, and other things I haven't thought about. Rob keeps his log in a spiral notebook. I keep mine in a Word document on my computer.

They did not discuss any legal ramifications regarding their documentation. I plan on showing mine only to my lawyer so he can decide whether or not it would help my case. Otherwise I use it so that I can decide "Oh, I haven't done this drill in a while. I'll work on that today." -type of thing. It also helps me keep track of how many rounds I have through my pistols.

This podcast is an hour long so listen to it only if you're really interested in keeping a log. They also touch on other aspects of self-defense, non-lethal, avoidance, types of practice, etc.

From: CCW Safe Podcast- Episode 78: Documenting Your Training - CCW Safe National | CCW Safe Weapon Liability | CCW Safe Defense Attorneys
CCW Safe Use of Force Expert Rob High and Firing Line Radio host Phillip Naman discuss good reasons to document your firearms and self-defense training.



Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
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The safe bet would be that anything we have done -or didn't do- can and will be used against us.

That's the prosecution's job, plain and simple. Their goal is to win their case, and they will use anything and everything to their advantage.

It's your defense's job to do just the reverse.

"Damned if you do, damned if you don't," and that's just how it goes.

For a well-known real-world example, look no further thant Zimmerman's MMA training.
 

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Discussion Starter · #172 ·
Hi,

The safe bet would be that anything we have done -or didn't do- can and will be used against us.

That's the prosecution's job, plain and simple. Their goal is to win their case, and they will use anything and everything to their advantage.

It's your defense's job to do just the reverse.

"Damned if you do, damned if you don't," and that's just how it goes.

For a well-known real-world example, look no further thant Zimmerman's MMA training.
No matter how you try to spin it, the truth is still the truth. I guess I'd rather rely on truth and facts than speculation, innuendo, and rumor. Hopefully my log will never come into play legally and I can just use it for my own record keeping. :)


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
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^ Agreed.

I document, too.

But then again, I'm a nerdy researcher, so I document everything, anyway! 😊 :geek: I figure that if the US government and our university's accreditation institutions wants me to document any and all training (including ongoing/renewals) that I've had that's pertinent to my job, documenting my training towards self-defense should be at worse par-for-course, should any questions ever arise.

Besides, I don't think that the instructors/schools who offer training would so readily document our participation in their classes - or hand out proof of completion or proficiency - if it was likely to come back on them, either...... o_O
 

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Hi,



You can see my initial review of these SpeedSights here: BassCliff's new SpeedSights on XD9

These old eyes like these sights much better than the stock dots on posts. Instead of "equal light, equal height", I can just line up the corners of the diamonds and Bob's your uncle. The only thing I regret about these sights is that I did not get tritium on front and rear, only on the front sight. But I've gotten really comfortable with these sights and they work well as long as I don't jerk the trigger. ;)

For my next pistol I'm considering the SpeedSights with tritium all the way around (I really like the diamonds), or the TruGlo TFO sights. If I'm not mistaken those are both tritium and fiber optic. I have fiber optic front sights on two of my pistols and really like those, easy for these old eyes to see. 🤓


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
Thanks for reply, and will check the review.

The Trijicon HD, and TruGlo TFO are the other two on the list. Still leaning towards all tritium speed sights though.
 
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Discussion Starter · #175 ·
Hi,

Thanks for reply, and will check the review.

The Trijicon HD, and TruGlo TFO are the other two on the list. Still leaning towards all tritium speed sights though.
Just remember that I'm an old noob, been shooting only a year and a half. I'm just letting you know what works for these old eyes. But I really like these sights. ;)


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
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