Springfield XD Forum banner
101 - 120 of 120 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
Discussion Starter · #101 ·
Hi,

Oh, hey! And just to add a little to my "hit and run" story, the insurance company totaled Mrs. BassCliff's Ford Focus. Last weekend we went out and got her a 2017 Chevy Malibu with 29,000 miles. These are not the land yachts I remember from the 70s. It's got a 1.5L turbocharged motor and more rear seat legroom than my Ram pickup. She likes it. It's got enough room for the grandkids. ;)








I do not know the dispensation of the drunk fellow who hit my car. I could not get any information due to the criminal nature of the case. We must protect the guilty, you know. Don't get me started. :p


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
  • Like
Reactions: TSiWRX and Pandaz3

·
Registered
Joined
·
687 Posts
You’ve had an eventful week! Glad no one was hurt. Due to the nature and circumstances of the incident and the likelihood of a judicial adventure for the family in the near future, making contact with those neighbors before the dust settles would most likely go sideways, create hostility in the neighborhood, and probably not advisable from a legal standpoint.

Mrs. Basscliff certainly has a nice looking ride!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,636 Posts
But, dog gone it, my activity during all the equipment moves allowed my magazine holder to let my spare mag slide up, out, and fall to the grass.
Did the pouch fall out, too? Or just the mag?

If the entire thing fell out, I'd start with the pouch hardware.

If only the mag, then I'd look to another pouch. :)

It's possible that with where you choose to carry that no completely soft-sided pouch will be usable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
Discussion Starter · #104 · (Edited)
Hi,

Did the pouch fall out, too? Or just the mag?

If the entire thing fell out, I'd start with the pouch hardware.

If only the mag, then I'd look to another pouch. :)

It's possible that with where you choose to carry that no completely soft-sided pouch will be usable.
Just the magazine fell out, not the carrier. I'm sure I posted a picture of my mag carriers earlier in the thread. They are all soft. When I repeatedly bend deeply at the knees my leg can push the mag up from the bottom, out of the carrier. I will normally compensate for it but sometimes I forget. The mag carriers stay in place, IWB clipped to my belt, but they are soft enough to allow the magazines to slip out, no retention. I'll have to get at least one for EDC use and thrash the others at the range.



Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
  • Like
Reactions: TSiWRX

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
Discussion Starter · #105 · (Edited)
Hey gang!

Here's a special treat for your comic relief. I was doing some laser practice last night and took a couple of videos on my old Kindle tablet. I was using my phone to capture my hits on the G-Sight app. This first effort is not too impressive but I thought I'd share so that you could heckle and advise. My g-sight timer session was set up for eight single shots with 5 second reloads in between. I was practicing my draw from concealed to get the first shot on target as quickly as possible. You'll see me fumble trying to defeat my shirt a couple times. I just need more practice, with all my EDC shirts. ;)



Here are a few of my better efforts. My accuracy was just OK with only a few off of center mass, shooting this target at five yards.













I was going to practice with both of my IWB holsters but did not utilize the leather during this session. I need to practice with it too because it carries a little deeper.



I'm headed to a real training session tomorrow. I'll try to be a sponge and soak up what they have to offer.


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
  • Like
Reactions: TSiWRX

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
Discussion Starter · #106 ·
Hi,

You’ve had an eventful week! Glad no one was hurt. Due to the nature and circumstances of the incident and the likelihood of a judicial adventure for the family in the near future, making contact with those neighbors before the dust settles would most likely go sideways, create hostility in the neighborhood, and probably not advisable from a legal standpoint.

Mrs. Basscliff certainly has a nice looking ride!
Mrs. BassCliff really likes her new wheels. So much so that she's taking a road trip next week, without me. :D

Yes, we will avoid the neighbors across the street. I still don't know if there's going to be a trial or if I'll be called as a witness, etc. The old man came over to apologize for the actions of his stepson. I told him thanks for saying that but his words were rather meaningless because of his own actions. That's where we left it, up to the insurance company, the police, the lawyers, and the judge.


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
  • Like
Reactions: clueless88

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,636 Posts
^ More on that session, tomorrow. :)

First.....

Just the magazine fell out, not the carrier. I'm sure I posted a picture of my mag carriers earlier in the thread. They are all soft. When I repleatedly bend deeply at the knees my leg can push the mag up from the bottom, out of the carrier. I will normally compensate for it but sometimes I forget. The mag carriers stay in place, IWB clipped to my belt, but they are soft enough to allow the magazines to slip out, no retention. I'll have to get at least one for EDC use and thrash the others at the range.
You're right, bruddah, I'm sure you did, too - I am just getting old and foggy. 😬 😅 🤪

Let's go for broke right-off and go for a hard Kydex or polymer plastic IWB magazine pouch - if you haven't already - one that fully covers the "bullet end" of the magazine. Get something with a bit of retentive force: either adjustable or, if just folded-over Kydex, something that you'd be willing to tweak, yourself, with a little heat.

Whatever you do, sweat that belt-clip as well - because once you make the switch, the top of your thigh will no longer be able to "squeeze out" that mag...so all that force is going to be focused at the clip. Make sure that whatever you choose, the clip is fastened well to the magazine pouch body, and that the clip also interfaces well with the belt, so it doesn't pop free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
Discussion Starter · #108 ·
Hi,

Let's go for broke right-off and go for a hard Kydex or polymer plastic IWB magazine pouch - if you haven't already - one that fully covers the "bullet end" of the magazine. Get something with a bit of retentive force: either adjustable or, if just folded-over Kydex, something that you'd be willing to tweak, yourself, with a little heat.

Whatever you do, sweat that belt-clip as well - because once you make the switch, the top of your thigh will no longer be able to "squeeze out" that mag...so all that force is going to be focused at the clip. Make sure that whatever you choose, the clip is fastened well to the magazine pouch body, and that the clip also interfaces well with the belt, so it doesn't pop free.
Indeed. I'll be looking around hoping to find a hard mag carrier with a bit of retention that I can modify using one of those really cool DCC clips. Maybe something like this? [Elite Quick Ship] Magazine Holster – MultiHolsters

Font Gas Household hardware Metal Fashion accessory


MultiHolsters just happens to make a custom carrier for the XD9. Anyway, just a thought. I'm still shopping. There are so many choices. ;)


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
  • Like
Reactions: TSiWRX

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,636 Posts
^ You know I don't trust FOMI clips, but I'd say that it's worth a try. :) At this point in your concealed-carry "game," it's about trial-and-error. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
Discussion Starter · #110 ·
Hi,

^ You know I don't trust FOMI clips, but I'd say that it's worth a try. :) At this point in your concealed-carry "game," it's about trial-and-error. :)
Indeed, lots of errors and trials. ;)

I plan to replace any FOMI clip with a DCC clip. Thanks for turning me on to those. Hopefully I can find a carrier sized for a DCC clip like my holster.

Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
  • Like
Reactions: TSiWRX

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,636 Posts
The great thing about DCC is that there's so many different configurations. :)

I have no ties to the company, but if you ever have any questions, email - [email protected]

Matt is SUPER responsive and also shares my somewhat whacky and always politically incorrect sense-of-humor. We somehow started a short email exchange after my contacting them about a stupid mistake I made on my last order...and I told him I think I ended up making a lifelong friend. 😬 :ROFLMAO:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,636 Posts
I was practicing my draw from concealed to get the first shot on target as quickly as possible. You'll see me fumble trying to defeat my shirt a couple times. I just need more practice, with all my EDC shirts. ;)
I think that you're doing very well!

Don't worry about the occasional fumbles. They'll happen just because you're doing so many reps. I bet that if I tell you to give me 5 -PERFECT- reps, but to go at what you believe is a sustainable speed to achieve that level of perfection, without blitzing, you'd still come in at well under 1.75-to-first-shot (and I'd bet that your shot placement would be better, too ;) ).

From what I can notice as a non-expert, I can still see a bit of inconsistencies in your technique - sometimes at full-speed, but usually only when I slow it down (thanks for teaching me that YouTube playback speed trick!). Out of curiosity, do you feel like you're hectic/rushed? If so, it could just be that you haven't completely burned-in this neuro-motor pathway. Try Joe Weyer's trick: slow the way down... Set your timer a par-time that's ridiculous, like 6 seconds, and aim to do a perfect draw, presentation, and to break the shot perfectly on-target just as you reach full extension, simultaneous to when your shot-timer beeps par. Do this 10 times in a row - 10 perfect times...and any time you screw up, start this set ALL over. Scrub a half second off the clock and repeat for another set of 10. Rinse-and-repeat until you drop below 4 seconds, and scrub a quarter-second, instead. Once you drop below 3, scrub by 0.1 seconds per iteration of 10. Once you drop below 2, scrub by 0.05.

When I confessed to Varg Freeborn that I felt rushed on the draw, he turned it around to me and asked me why? I took about a minute's pause before I replied "I think it's because I'm inconsistent."

And that's really it.

If you watch the really fast guys/gals do it, it almost seems like they are slow. It's because they've burned-in their most efficient path possible.

In some of your reps, for example, I'm seeing that you're actually following your shirt down just a little with your left hand - this is of-course wasted motion...you don't need the shirt at that point: just let it go and let that hand meet your dominant hand for the presentation. ;) Instead, what's happening in those reps is that your left hand is now trying to play catch-up.

:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
Discussion Starter · #113 ·
Hi,

In some of your reps, for example, I'm seeing that you're actually following your shirt down just a little with your left hand - this is of-course wasted motion...you don't need the shirt at that point: just let it go and let that hand meet your dominant hand for the presentation. ;) Instead, what's happening in those reps is that your left hand is now trying to play catch-up.

:)
Excellent observations and instructions. I will practice and video lots of reps with slower and more deliberate motions in order to critique myself. I do not need to be pulling my shirt back down after the draw or have other wasted motions. I also noticed that I do not pull the trigger right at full extension. I could probably shave a few tenths off by having everything lined up at the proper time so that I could fire the shot just as I reach full extension.

As for feeling hectic/rushed, I can tell when I'm trying to "force" it. I can also tell when I've done everything (mostly) right because it feels good and shots are on target. I'll slow down to build in the muscle memory.

I'm going for a training session after work at United Defense Tactical. Hopefully they can teach this old noob some new tricks. ;)


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
  • Like
Reactions: TSiWRX

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,636 Posts
Excellent observations and instructions. I will practice and video lots of reps with slower and more deliberate motions in order to critique myself. I do not need to be pulling my shirt back down after the draw or have other wasted motions. I also noticed that I do not pull the trigger right at full extension. I could probably shave a few tenths off by having everything lined up at the proper time so that I could fire the shot just as I reach full extension.

As for feeling hectic/rushed, I can tell when I'm trying to "force" it. I can also tell when I've done everything (mostly) right because it feels good and shots are on target. I'll slow down to build in the muscle memory.
Great self-assessment. Keep it up, keep it real. (y)

Having that trigger break right at the time you have the sights aligned on-target is the goal - right now, full-presentation is a good place to "hit that mark," if you will. Later on down the path, you can start to have that first shot go off as soon as you've come to "acceptable," or even as you draw to retention. Right now, full-extension at perfect sight-alignment is just the most consistent place you can train towards this goal.

So that's the second half of this, right? You also want your sights perfectly aligned at the moment you come to full extension, too. This then ties into that "rushed/forced" feeling - those sights aren't going to settle if we're just tossing that gun out there. It's kinda like watching a Precision Driving Team doing their tricks - smoothness is the name of the game.

I talk a good game, but trust me, this is what I'm working on, too. 😅

Oh, and towards working Weyer's method: understand that this is extremely physically demanding. Getting that perfect rep. of ten when every mistake means that you have to start over, particularly at the beginning or after you've pushed through a plateau can be physically very, very rough. Don't push yourself too, too hard. Build up your endurance over time, and don't lose faith when it seems like you're taking steps backwards. It will come, I promise you.

I'm going for a training session after work at United Defense Tactical. Hopefully they can teach this old noob some new tricks. ;)
(y)(y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
Discussion Starter · #115 ·
Hi,

This past Thursday I had a training session with a couple other students at a facility called United Defense Tactical. It was an introductory lesson with a little sales pitch at the end. They sell memberships there instead of having classes and lessons that you can buy "a la carte".

The facility is located in a business park down by the beach. At this location they have simulators, rooms with "accordion" walls used to set up a shoot house, a mat room where hand-to-hand self-defense is taught, a weight room for physical conditioning classes, etc. It's a pretty cool facility.



Right inside that door is a gift shop of sorts. I received a '$25 off' coupon for purchases of $100 or more.




Then to the right was the check-in desk. A nice young fellow got me checked in while I watched the video of live fire practice this outfit offers.



After my "classmates" and I checked in we were brought to a room with a simulator. Here we are practicing a "shoot and scoot" scenario. We were taught that the bad guys don't train with moving targets, so we practiced walking while shooting. I put all of my shots on center mass.



We were taught that if we stood still we had about an 85% (or better) chance of being hit with a bullet. If we are moving while we defend ourselves the chances go down to 11% we'll be hit if the bad guy is shooting at us. Then we moved on to simulated live self-defense scenarios. Two images from their website:





These were simulated scenarios for my classmates.

A home intrusion:



Here we came home to our front door being kicked in and the perp still inside.



My classmates elected for "home defense" scenarios. My classmates did not shoot their antagonists and both ended up wounded at least. The instructor unpacked their scenarios and talked about communication with the alleged bad guy, castle doctrine (California has a watered down form of castle doctrine compared to, say, Texas), when to use deadly force, etc.

The instructor made my scenario a little different because I have my CCW. I could not take a picture of it because I was too involved. My scenario was walking out of my office and being confronted by an armed bad guy who wanted the keys to my car. We were encouraged to interact with the video, communicate, move, etc, even though it was more or less a video game. We ran my scenario twice. The first time I told the perp to take it easy and just go away. I could see the gun in his waistband. When he drew, I did too. I took him out with a couple of shots but not before he got off a shot. The instructor said that was OK but it was basically an Old West shoot-out kind of gun fight. Not ideal. The second time, when the perp confronted me, visible gun in his waistband, I drew right away, punched out, and told him "Hey, I don't want any trouble. Just go away!" The bad guy, of course, drew anyway but I took him out before he could get off a shot.

The instructor went deep when unpacking my scenario. I did see the other fellow walking across the parking lot when I exited the office. I did not know if he was an accomplice. I did not check my six when my confrontation was over. Oops. There were windows next to my antagonist. While I did not have any errant shots, I could have moved to make sure there was less chance of any stray bullets hitting innocents behind the glass. Instead of punching out with my pistol I may have wanted to stay in a "low ready" position until there was an imminent danger. If another CCW holder saw me holding a gun on the antagonist he might've thought I was the bad guy and taken me out. The instructor brought out a few other points. I could have just run away and hoped for the best. I could have just tossed him my keys. My life is worth more than my car, right? It turns out this guy was going to draw anyway but the instructor emphasized communication to try and de-escalate the situation, or at least give a warning, give the bad guy a chance to walk away and live, etc. The law here is weird, ya know?

I'm not sure if I'll be going back to this facility. I'd like to but it's pricey and a pretty far commute. They sell one year memberships and not lessons. The membership packages sound great but I don't think it's for me. I might not be here in the area but another six months. Oh well, I learned a lot from this lesson anyway. Don't worry, I'll find other instruction. Until then...


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
  • Like
Reactions: TSiWRX

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,636 Posts
As-always, thank you for taking the time to share!

That's a cool facility and training facility, I really like the scenario-based training, and it reads to me like they did a good job debriefing, which is really the most important part of the entire experience.

There is now at least one similar facility around where I live: I need to get in there! :)

Some thoughts/alternative viewpoints.....

We were taught that the bad guys don't train with moving targets, so we practiced walking while shooting. I put all of my shots on center mass.
The other way to look at this is that bad-guys shoot at moving targets all the time: in an actual gunfight, no less.

And if we look at things from this perspective, we're actually the ones who are at a deficit, aren't we? 😅

We were taught that if we stood still we had about an 85% (or better) chance of being hit with a bullet. If we are moving while we defend ourselves the chances go down to 11% we'll be hit if the bad guy is shooting at us.
Here, the more nuanced discussion would include -

(1) What happens if the bad-guy(s) is/are also moving? How well can we actually shoot, moving at realistic speeds (think back to your shooting while moving - were you sprinting, as you would likely be doing if actually caught in the open, or were you doing the Groucho heel-and-toe, all SWAT-like? ;) - what's more realistic, given our lifestyles?)?

(2) Are you better off standing-and-delivering, or are you better off immediately and aggressively displacing, finding cover, and then engaging?

(3) Does the equation change, when you already have your firearm presented, versus if you were forced to reactively respond?

Now, with any of the above, don't get me wrong - I very much do appreciate that the instructional cadre have planted the seeds of success in your and your classmates' heads. My points above should not be taken as criticism for what or how they taught, but rather as further points to ponder. Overall, remember that things aren't going to be quite as distilled in the real-world, and that any statistic or set of statistics aren't "complete," without examining yet others (if you get a chance, John Hearn's presentation on interpersonal violence shows just how crazy the statistics actually are, when you take their limitations and the study's stipulations into consideration) Certainly, the other part of the story is that this is just one class - and the first time they've seen you, at-that - so it would honestly likely be counterproductive for them to have expanded things to the degree that I just did (which, itself, is still incomplete). Only so much can be taught -and retained- in one class. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
Discussion Starter · #117 · (Edited)
Hi,

As-always, thank you for taking the time to share!
Yeah, yeah, yeah. I'm just showing off how much I don't know. ;)

That's a cool facility and training facility, I really like the scenario-based training, and it reads to me like they did a good job debriefing, which is really the most important part of the entire experience.

There is now at least one similar facility around where I live: I need to get in there! :)
I like the idea behind their setup. I think it tends to build community and camaraderie. Even with the basic package, which gives you 52 weeks of various instruction, one hour a week of pistol training in all kinds of scenarios from CQC to vehicle interdiction, general fitness training classes, yoga classes, MMA type instruction for hand-to-hand defense, all kinds of stuff. Our instructor, Jared, said that some students are there six days a week taking all the various classes. Plus they have a once a month trip to their outdoor range for an eight hour live fire training session. It certainly seems like a complete package.

Some thoughts/alternative viewpoints.....

The other way to look at this is that bad-guys shoot at moving targets all the time: in an actual gunfight, no less.

And if we look at things from this perspective, we're actually the ones who are at a deficit, aren't we? 😅
I don't know where Jared got those numbers. I was just there to listen, observe, learn. But in general I would agree that moving targets are harder to hit. And we don't know how much the bad guy trains. But we certainly want to be better trained. :D

Here, the more nuanced discussion would include -

(1) What happens if the bad-guy(s) is/are also moving? How well can we actually shoot, moving at realistic speeds (think back to your shooting while moving - were you sprinting, as you would likely be doing if actually caught in the open, or were you doing the Groucho heel-and-toe, all SWAT-like? ;) - what's more realistic, given our lifestyles?)?

(2) Are you better off standing-and-delivering, or are you better off immediately and aggressively displacing, finding cover, and then engaging?

(3) Does the equation change, when you already have your firearm presented, versus if you were forced to reactively respond?

Now, with any of the above, don't get me wrong - I very much do appreciate that the instructional cadre have planted the seeds of success in your and your classmates' heads. My points above should not be taken as criticism for what or how they taught, but rather as further points to ponder. Overall, remember that things aren't going to be quite as distilled in the real-world, and that any statistic or set of statistics aren't "complete," without examining yet others (if you get a chance, John Hearn's presentation on interpersonal violence shows just how crazy the statistics actually are, when you take their limitations and the study's stipulations into consideration) Certainly, the other part of the story is that this is just one class - and the first time they've seen you, at-that - so it would honestly likely be counterproductive for them to have expanded things to the degree that I just did (which, itself, is still incomplete). Only so much can be taught -and retained- in one class. :)
Yes, we covered only a small portion of everything that could happen in a real-world scenario. In my simulation Jared mentioned using my car as cover if I was able to continue walking toward it. I'm sure future lessons would include various techniques of motion, cover, close quarters interactions, etc.

In one quick CQC demonstration Jared invaded my space and told me to draw my SIRT pistol on him in order to defend myself. Just as I cleared the holster he took his hand, firmly placed it on top of the pistol, and pinned the pistol to my torso. I couldn't move it and if I'd pulled the trigger would only have shot myself. He then showed me how to draw so that a bad guy that close would have a harder time getting his hand on my gun. He also showed me one way to defend myself using my elbow to his face in order to create some space between us. Jared is a little smaller than I but in excellent condition and well-trained. It was eye-opening to realize how vulnerable I could be even when carrying a pistol.

Even though I'm not able to sign up for a full membership at this place, due to my circumstances, I'm going to see if they can accommodate me as a part-time student. Jared seemed amenable to "work something out". In the meantime I'll check out Varg Freeborn, John Hearn, and other expert material I can find online. I need to study all the notes you've given me. Thanks. :)

Here's something fun. On my XD9's SpeedSights I have the tritium front sight but the back sights are plain white. I can see the sights OK in all but the darkest situations. So I thought I'd experiment with some of this Glow-On product, maybe a couple of dots or thin lines on my rear sights to make them more visible in the dark. I got the amber and the green colors. I'll let you know. ;)

Food Automotive tire Packaging and labeling Ingredient Natural foods


Here's something funner. I was doing yard work today and needed a pickax. I wonder if anyone was concerned when they saw this guy walking through the store.

Shoulder Hat Sleeve Eyewear Sun hat



Probably not. Even so, I had two ways to defend myself if necessary. :p




Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
  • Love
Reactions: TSiWRX

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
Discussion Starter · #118 ·
Hi,

Just for grins and giggles, I did this today.

Font Screenshot Number Parallel Document


I don't actually own a rifle yet, but I will. ;)


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,636 Posts
I don't know where Jared got those numbers. I was just there to listen, observe, learn. But in general I would agree that moving targets are harder to hit. And we don't know how much the bad guy trains. But we certainly want to be better trained. :D
(y)

Yup, the only thing that we can control is that we better ourselves - there's a whole half of the fight that we don't get any say in whatsoever. :ROFLMAO:

As for the numbers, it's not that I don't like that instructors/schools use statistics, rather, I just wanted to call attention to the fact that there's any number of ways to interpret those statistics. We tend to latch on to numbers without really asking the "why/how" behind them, so while I honestly do think there's value to be had in playing the numbers, we always have to put any such figure in-perspective, and to also think of alternative ways of viewing the statistics.

It's like reading a statistic that the opposing line of thought may throw out - we naturally want to pick it apart, right?

But if we're willing that to the arguments we may disagree with, we must also do the same with what we do agree with. It's only fair, if nothing else. ;)

Yes, we covered only a small portion of everything that could happen in a real-world scenario. In my simulation Jared mentioned using my car as cover if I was able to continue walking toward it. I'm sure future lessons would include various techniques of motion, cover, close quarters interactions, etc.
I think it's fantastic how this school is building its own tribe - and the kind fo integrated combatives is exactly what I think every person who carries a gun for the reason of "self defense" really needs to at least look at and consider. For example:

In one quick CQC demonstration Jared invaded my space and told me to draw my SIRT pistol on him in order to defend myself. Just as I cleared the holster he took his hand, firmly placed it on top of the pistol, and pinned the pistol to my torso. I couldn't move it and if I'd pulled the trigger would only have shot myself. He then showed me how to draw so that a bad guy that close would have a harder time getting his hand on my gun. He also showed me one way to defend myself using my elbow to his face in order to create some space between us. Jared is a little smaller than I but in excellent condition and well-trained. It was eye-opening to realize how vulnerable I could be even when carrying a pistol.
^ emphasis added.....

Yup.

This is something that I've written about before -both to you specifically (BassCliff's Noob EDC Adventures and BassCliff's (CA) CCW Adventures, Carry or Bust...) as well as throughout the Forums in-general- (Springfield XD Forum , just as one quick example) that every time (in integrated combatives training) that I try to solve a problem with a tool instead of just working to solve the problem, that's when I get my ass handed to me. 😅😊

We all have the tendency to try to use whatever we have as "the biggest tool" to solve every problem that seems to even remotely necessitate bringing it into play. It's so natural that in just about every culture there's a similar saying for "When all you carry is a hammer, the world's problems seem like nails."

Going to the gun isn't always going to be the right answer - and the same goes for thinking that just because you're carrying a gun, you've checked-off that "I'm protecting myself, I'm protecting my loved ones" box.

In-reality, our biggest problem is that as defenders, we're more than likely going to be playing catch-up. All the tools we have are simply ways to try to even our odds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,636 Posts
BTW, you really should be proud how you far you've come in just this short period of time - and I've also gotta say that it's awesome to see yet one more member on this Forum who is both so passionate about the path as well as remains open-minded and wanting to learn more. (y)
 
101 - 120 of 120 Posts
Top