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Discussion Starter · #61 · (Edited)
Hi,

^ Be careful in your knife selection, then.

Ohio is a mess, too, just like that.

And while you most likely won't ever get into trouble, this is one of those areas where if you do, the potential fallout could actually be worse, due to the subjective nature with which knives are viewed by law-enforcement. Varg Freeborn's "Violence of Mind" covers this in-detail, and I would highly recommend reading it if you are serious in thinking about carrying a knife as possibly more than strictly a package-opening tool.
As it so happened, today I was driving by my local Big 5 on a Monday afternoon and decided to stop in just to say "Hi" and take a look at the ammo shelf, knowing that they got their shipment four days ago.

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I said "Hi" to my ammo angel, Ashley, and proceeded to the firearm counter. They were out of practice 9mm but still had over a dozen boxes of the Norma SD hollow points. Imagine that?

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Since we'd been talking about it, I took a closer look at their selection of knives. I'll have to do a little research into sport/utility knives, what is legal to carry, and how to carry it.

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What really caught my eye were these Smith&Wesson knives. They look pretty mean. ;)

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I don't know a thing about them but I will soon. I picked up just one box of the Norma MHP defense ammo. Even with my discount it's near $2 a round today.

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In talking with the clerk he mentioned that the shipments are getting more steady, more consistent, as far as what they are receiving each week, and the prices are starting to fall a bit. I hope this trend continues. In the meantime, I think I'll do a little knife research.


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
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See if you can find a concealed-carry oriented, non-traditional-martial-arts "defensive knife" class in your area.

Even better if it allows students to pressure-cook with a same-as or similar-to training knife (it's one of the first things I look for, when looking for a defensive knife: that there's a trainer for it), so that you can see what it is like to deploy one while under pressure, be it inside the clench or just as you may face-off with an aggressor.

You don't need to commit to any long-term training right-off: just a quick day-seminar (or three) will really open your eyes to the real-world concerns involved in trying to get one of these tools into play.

If the class is an integrated combative one, all the better.

My core belief is that it should never be about the tool: that it should always be about problem-solving the actual fight.

Every time I got my ass handed to me in those types of classes, it was always because I tried to "solve the problem "with a tool." Instead, when I worked the problem for what it is and simply allowed my brain to select what tools may be appropriate to help me solve the problem (maybe that's the gun, or maybe it's a knife, or maybe it's some empty-hand skills or verbal-Judo....or maybe it's just time to really beat-feet), that always led to better outcomes.
 

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^ Be careful in your knife selection, then.

Ohio is a mess, too, just like that.

And while you most likely won't ever get into trouble, this is one of those areas where if you do, the potential fallout could actually be worse, due to the subjective nature with which knives are viewed by law-enforcement. Varg Freeborn's "Violence of Mind" covers this in-detail, and I would highly recommend reading it if you are serious in thinking about carrying a knife as possibly more than strictly a package-opening tool.
Michigan is just as bad.

We finally got auto knives legalized a few years back but there are several cities in the state that have no knife laws, doesnt matter the size, just no knives.

We got a bill passed in the house this year to preempt knife laws, but it has stalled since. I was told the idiot governor would veto it, so that could be why it hasn't moved.

Very disturbing that they would allow you to be a felon because a few cities have odd laws.
You can carry a 19rd 9mm XDm but a box cutter is a no no.
 

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Michigan is just as bad.

We finally got auto knives legalized a few years back but there are several cities in the state that have no knife laws, doesnt matter the size, just no knives.

We got a bill passed in the house this year to preempt knife laws, but it has stalled since. I was told the idiot governor would veto it, so that could be why it hasn't moved.

Very disturbing that they would allow you to be a felon because a few cities have odd laws.
You can carry a 19rd 9mm XDm but a box cutter is a no no.
Damn I’m lucky. Never considered an open sidearm or a 6” skinner as anything but fashion accessories! I read Montana is like 1956 America. Not true we have color tv and internet. Those advances haven’t taken away our roots of hunting and personal responsibility to ones own safety. I guess it’s really different when you can regularly be miles from anyone else and help. I’m sorry you guys have to consider so much just to carry simple daily tools. I do have to say I’ve never thought about a knife class unless it was to improve my skinning and meat prep skills!
 

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^ It's really the lack of state preemption that's most troubling - the jumbling of local-level ordinances means that from one city, township, or village to the next, a person with no ill intent whatsoever can well be in-violation of a law that has carries with it significant legal consequences.

Combine this with the subjective nature of and inconsistent enforcement practices, it's really just a minefield waiting for the unlucky.
 

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
Hi,

I did a silly thing yesterday.

I was setting up my gear, lots of bending, lifting, carrying, climbing up and down the staircase to the stage, etc. All of a sudden I heard something fairly heavy hit the stage floor and when I looked down I saw that my spare magazine had worked its way out of the carrier and fallen out. Yikes! I'm glad I was the only one on stage at that time and the crowd hadn't arrived to this outdoor event. I quickly but non-nonchalantly picked up my XD mag and slipped it back into the carrier under my shirt. This was what I was wearing at the time, not an issue as far as concealment.

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I have three of these fairly inexpensive mag carriers. (I suppose "inexpensive" is the problem.)

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These are a knock-off of the Houston Gun Holster Eco Leather magazine holder. I guess with all my motion my leg was pushing the magazine up and out of the carrier. These carriers are comfy but there is no retention. I suppose I'm going to have to spend some decent money on at least one good carrier for EDC and relegate these to range practice.

Any suggestions for an IWB carrier for my XD9 magazine? MultiHolsters Elite? Tulster?


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
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^ It's OK - that kind of stuff will happen. Gear-interactions are really a very unique-individual:unique-gear issue, so it's just like that: you vet your own, over time and circumstances.

A single failure like that doesn't necessarily suggest that the gear is un-usable, particularly when the event occurred so soon after implementation. I would be tempted to re-position and re-try, if you don't mind slightly different clocking.

Out of curiosity, is your belt actually tight enough on your waist? When you draw with a normal draw-stroke, does your belt displace upwards - at all - before you break retention on the holster? The best way to visualize this would be to film yourself using some kind of slow-motion capture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
Hi,

^ It's OK - that kind of stuff will happen. Gear-interactions are really a very unique-individual:unique-gear issue, so it's just like that: you vet your own, over time and circumstances.

A single failure like that doesn't necessarily suggest that the gear is un-usable, particularly when the event occurred so soon after implementation. I would be tempted to re-position and re-try, if you don't mind slightly different clocking.

Out of curiosity, is your belt actually tight enough on your waist? When you draw with a normal draw-stroke, does your belt displace upwards - at all - before you break retention on the holster? The best way to visualize this would be to film yourself using some kind of slow-motion capture.
Thanks. I like having my extra mag up front. Depending on the pants and where the belt loops are positioned, the carrier can ride anywhere between noon and nine o'clock. I'll be doing a little more experimenting and shopping around for a carrier with retention.

My belt is pretty dang tight. I don't notice any movement when I draw but I will try to video my technique. If I can post it, feel free to critique. I'll see if my video editing software can slow it down. My phone's not smart enough to. ;)

Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
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I like having my extra mag up front. Depending on the pants and where the belt loops are positioned, the carrier can ride anywhere between noon and nine o'clock. I'll be doing a little more experimenting and shopping around for a carrier with retention.
One thing that a lot of beginning concealed-carriers do not realize is that although the action is a "tell," we sometimes have to compromise a bit and adjust our gear, in order to (better) facilitate our daily activities.

Changing the clocking, tilt, ride-height, etc. of our beltline gear can often be done with enough subtlety that those who are not specifically looking simply will not notice, especially if you can incorporate it into a part of what are "typical" wardrobe-adjustment mannerisms that are common to our culture.

For example, the usual lifting of the pants legs to preserve creasing or the adjustment of the shirt/jacket can be cover for adjusting carried items nearby.

A quick lifting of one's pants upon exiting a vehicle or from-sitting is also very accepted behavior in most Western cultures, and can be used to subtly push down and re-seat the holster, knife, or spare-mag carrier.

Finally, remember that normal movement can cause gear to displace to some degree or another. Just as you would necessarily - and probably subconsciously - adjust items of your normal wardrobe to accommodate such shifts, look to (and remember to) also check-in on your EDC gear, too.

There's a difference between fidgeting enough for the behavior to be a tell...versus an otherwise seemingly normal adjustment of one's wardrobe, which is an action that we all do throughout the day. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 · (Edited)
Hi,

A funny thing happened today. I was making an ammo run (a very successful ammo run!) and while I was standing at the counter chatting to the clerk ringing up my sale, this young fellow walked in who seemed a bit odd. His eyes were darting around, he was mumbling, pacing nervously, etc. He interrupted my conversation with the clerk to ask, "You guys don't sell sub-machine guns and sh*t?" It's then I noticed what I first thought was his phone hanging out of his pocket. When I took a closer look he turned away. All this time I thought the poor fellow had a mental issue, or perhaps was altered by a substance abuse. He was clean, was wearing clean clothes (a red t-shirt and baggy black shorts that looked laundered), and was wearing a new looking backpack. He did not seem homeless. I told him, "Nope, fully automatic firearms are illegal in this state." The clerk and I chatted with him for a few more seconds, explaining the different between semi- and full-auto, when three officers came in, surrounded him, asked him to put his hands up, and then asked him if he had any weapons.

When the fellow put his hands up one of the officers reached into his pocket and pulled out a very realistic looking Sig Airsoft pistol. (That's what I thought at first was a phone hanging out of his pocket.) The officers escorted the young man outside to have a chat, search his backpack, etc.

As the clerk and I finished our business he told me that this person was known to the store personnel, had shoplifted there before, and that clerk had actually sold him that Airsoft pistol. It seems the fellow was known to the local police department too. He put my purchase in a double bag. He said that way it would look less like ammo when I walked out. I told him that's OK, I have a permit. :) When I walked outside there were four patrol cars and several officers on scene. I must say, the officers were very professional and polite. The young fellow complied with verbal commands. The situation did not escalate and nobody got hurt.

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Needless to say, I learned a bit from that encounter. Sometimes you don't have to be polite and it's OK to stare if you think something is amiss. I should've recognized that pistol grip right away as it was hanging out of his pocket. I like to think I'm pretty observant but in this case it would have paid to be even MORE observant. While Airsoft is less lethal they can still do damage. And what if it would've been a real gun? I don't know who called LEO. I doubt it was anyone in the store, police arrived too quickly after the young fellow did. I think it was someone who saw him walking the street with an exposed firearm and the young fellow ducked into the store because it was familiar to him.

OK, that's my rambling for today. Lesson learned: Be observant, be very observant. If something looks amiss, take a closer look.


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
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Hi,

A funny thing happened today. I was making an ammo run (a very successful ammo run!) and while I was standing at the counter chatting to the clerk ringing up my sale, this young fellow walked in who seemed a bit odd. His eyes were darting around, he was mumbling, pacing nervously, etc. He interrupted my conversation with the clerk to ask, "You guys don't sell sub-machine guns and sh*t?" It's then I noticed what I first thought was his phone hanging out of his pocket. When I took a closer look he turned away. All this time I thought the poor fellow had a mental issue, or perhaps was altered by a substance abuse. He was clean, was wearing clean clothes (a red t-shirt and baggy black shorts that looked laundered), and was wearing a new looking backpack. He did not seem homeless. I told him, "Nope, fully automatic firearms are illegal in this state." The clerk and I chatted with him for a few more seconds, explaining the different between semi- and full-auto, when three officers came in, surrounded him, asked him to put his hands up, and then asked him if he had any weapons.

When the fellow put his hands up one of the officers reached into his pocket and pulled out a very realistic looking Sig Airsoft pistol. (That's what I thought at first was a phone hanging out of his pocket.) The officers escorted the young man outside to have a chat, search his backpack, etc.

As the clerk and I finished our business he told me that this person was known to the store personnel, had shoplifted there before, and that clerk had actually sold him that Airsoft pistol. It seems the fellow was known to the local police department too. He put my purchase in a double bag. He said that way it would look less like ammo when I walked out. I told him that's OK, I have a permit. :) When I walked outside there were four patrol cars and several officers on scene. I must say, the officers were very professional and polite. The young fellow complied with verbal commands. The situation did not escalate and nobody got hurt.

View attachment 843995

Needless to say, I learned a bit from that encounter. Sometimes you don't have to be polite and it's OK to stare if you think something is amiss. I should've recognized that pistol grip right away as it was hanging out of his pocket. I like to think I'm pretty observant but in this case it would have paid to be even MORE observant. While Airsoft is less lethal they can still do damage. And what if it would've been a real gun? I don't know who called LEO. I doubt it was anyone in the store, police arrived too quickly after the young fellow did. I think it was someone who saw him walking the street with an exposed firearm and the young fellow ducked into the store because it was familiar to him.

OK, that's my rambling for today. Lesson learned: Be observant, be very observant. If something looks amiss, take a closer look.


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
Some years back I was working on a behind the back holster. My dad had asked me to make him one for a 45acp. I had not ever made anything like what he wanted so I was experimenting with what I thought was a good solid design. Felt good in the house and figured the can’t would keep the pistol secure. I put my really pretty browning high power in it and grabbed dog and headed out for a walk. My dog pulls on her leash and we walk very fast. Just as I’m in the middle of a long sidewalk on a busy street I hear that clunk sound. My high power dislodged and hit the ground chipping what was otherwise a pristine stock and dinged the hammer ever so slightly. Mind you I only have working guns but this high power was given to me by my dad and it’s beautiful. I scooped the pistol up put it in my coat pocket and headed home. I am still working on a behind the back holster but they now have retention straps on them. It still hurts every time I look at that stock and it’s made me work extra hard on the holsters I make. Behind the back owb is really tough to keep the grip tight into the small of the back and we are both small but he wants to carry a full size. My browning is as close as I have to full size acp but I don’t use that pistol for testing anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
Hi,

If something looks amiss, walk away ASAP.
Indeed, and I have in other situations. This time my "Spidey sense" wasn't tingling and the young fellow seemed more confused than threatening. I was aware something was a little off but the "fight or flight" instinct had not kicked in. It might've played out differently if the officers hadn't had a BOLO for him and showed up when they did. Let's be careful, and observant, out there.


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Hi,

Some years back I was working on a behind the back holster. My dad had asked me to make him one for a 45acp. I had not ever made anything like what he wanted so I was experimenting with what I thought was a good solid design. Felt good in the house and figured the can’t would keep the pistol secure. I put my really pretty browning high power in it and grabbed dog and headed out for a walk. My dog pulls on her leash and we walk very fast. Just as I’m in the middle of a long sidewalk on a busy street I hear that clunk sound. My high power dislodged and hit the ground chipping what was otherwise a pristine stock and dinged the hammer ever so slightly. Mind you I only have working guns but this high power was given to me by my dad and it’s beautiful. I scooped the pistol up put it in my coat pocket and headed home. I am still working on a behind the back holster but they now have retention straps on them. It still hurts every time I look at that stock and it’s made me work extra hard on the holsters I make. Behind the back owb is really tough to keep the grip tight into the small of the back and we are both small but he wants to carry a full size. My browning is as close as I have to full size acp but I don’t use that pistol for testing anymore.
Ouch! Sorry to hear this, especially when it happens to a family heirloom like that. Good luck with your holster design. :)

I take it you didn't raise any eyebrows during your escapade. That's good.


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 

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I won’t stay on my soap box long….

Bad things happen EXTREMELY fast. Did I say EXTREMELY. I don’t subscribe to the sheepdog nonsense that is on the web. Fight or Flight…I’m Flight all day, every day, as long as possible.

Be smart, be safe, carry on, be home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
Hi,

I won’t stay on my soap box long….

Bad things happen EXTREMELY fast. Did I say EXTREMELY. I don’t subscribe to the sheepdog nonsense that is on the web. Fight or Flight…I’m Flight all day, every day, as long as possible.

Be smart, be safe, carry on, be home.
You stay on your soapbox as long as you want. My Dad used to say to me, "Son, sometimes I gotta hit you in the head with a 2x4 just to get your attention!" ;)


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 

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Indeed, and I have in other situations. This time my "Spidey sense" wasn't tingling and the young fellow seemed more confused than threatening. I was aware something was a little off but the "fight or flight" instinct had not kicked in. It might've played out differently if the officers hadn't had a BOLO for him and showed up when they did. Let's be careful, and observant, out there.
Varg Freeborn and Claude Werner got into it over their respective thoughts about the OODA loop a while back. It's really too bad that that exchange is no longer available due to the ways of the Zuck, but both men have written extensively of their thoughts, and they're both worth reading.

I'm going to plug Varg's first book, "Violence of Mind," yet again. :) Werner's thoughts are available on his blog, under the "OODA" category: OODA – tacticalprofessor

This said, I don't think that you were so much stuck in the "orientation" part of the loop, since you were able to continue to process and make-conversation with the contact and also to remain observant, versus that your orientation to interpersonal violence caused you to normalize -and minimize- the threat (normalcy bias).

I know that reading/studying a subject isn't the same as "living it" - and I really think that's why Force-on-Force as well as complicated problem-solving training (such as integrated combatives and live-fire shoot-house classes) should be parts of the well-rounded self-defender's training regimen - but I do believe strongly that the first step is to educate yourself...and my academic background says "read!" :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #78 · (Edited)
Hi,

Varg Freeborn and Claude Werner got into it over their respective thoughts about the OODA loop a while back. It's really too bad that that exchange is no longer available due to the ways of the Zuck, but both men have written extensively of their thoughts, and they're both worth reading.

I'm going to plug Varg's first book, "Violence of Mind," yet again. :) Werner's thoughts are available on his blog, under the "OODA" category: OODA – tacticalprofessor

This said, I don't think that you were so much stuck in the "orientation" part of the loop, since you were able to continue to process and make-conversation with the contact and also to remain observant, versus that your orientation to interpersonal violence caused you to normalize -and minimize- the threat (normalcy bias).

I know that reading/studying a subject isn't the same as "living it" - and I really think that's why Force-on-Force as well as complicated problem-solving training (such as integrated combatives and live-fire shoot-house classes) should be parts of the well-rounded self-defender's training regimen - but I do believe strongly that the first step is to educate yourself...and my academic background says "read!" :)
We talked about OODA in my CCW class in addition to your instruction references, Mr. @TSiWRX. We've also talked about de-escalation, here and in the CCW class. The young fellow seemed to be settling down just because we were paying attention to him, speaking to him with dignity and respect, treating him like one of God's children. I made sure not to turn my back to him. Maybe we (the clerk and I) got lucky. Maybe we did just enough to avoid an ugly scene.

But you are correct. I should probably get out of the habit of thinking everyone is nice and acts just like me. There are indeed evil people in the world, demon-possessed, psychopathic, whatever. I'll read up, educate myself. :)


Thank you for your indulgence,

BassCliff
 
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The young fellow seemed to be settling down just because we were paying attention to him, speaking to him with dignity and respect, treating him like one of God's children. I made sure not to turn my back to him. Maybe we (me and the clerk) got lucky. Maybe we did just enough to avoid an ugly scene.
(y)

De-escalation is always best: I'm of the opinion that a battle not fought is always a battle won.

In today's legal and social minefield, even when the act of self-defense is legally and morally justified - and you emerge righteously triumphant - the post-event fallout is never guaranteed to also swing in your favor.

But you are correct. I should probably get out of the habit of thinking everyone is nice and acts just like me. There are indeed evil people in the world, demon-possessed, psychopathic, whatever. I'll read up, educate myself. :)
I am of this inclination as well.

Because of my upbringing, I seem to "fit" no matter where I go, and I also find that I genuinely encounter good people wherever I go.

And as with you, I think that this is why I need to keep in mind that not everyone will fit that mold.

If you haven't had a chance already, the other resource that I've cited frequently is the Personal Defense Network (PDN) tribute page to the late Dr. William Aprill: William Aprill Tribute Page

PDN's content is typically not my favorite, but Dr. Aprill's "Unthinkable" lecture was truly among the best that I've ever attended, and it's well-agreed upon by alumni that this free resource provided by PDN actually captures well much of the most important materials.

More recently, John Hearne seems to have picked up where Aprill left off, albeit with a slightly different, more numbers/statistical (the way Hearne parses the data, however, is most interesting)-driven look at the same equation of interpersonal violence. I was able to attend a Zoom class presentation of his during the Pandemic, but I have not since found that classwork via either pay-content or free links. There's currently a ~1-hour, 40-minutes interview of the American Warrior Society with Hearn that's available on Youtube, but I have yet to have the time to shake out its contents:


^ I'm going to try to give this one a listen later today, so don't jump on it right-away, @BassCliff, I don't want it to be a waste of your time! :)
 

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Listening to that interview, now.

It's pretty good, but it's harder to follow than Hearne's "How Paranoid Are You" presentation because of the lack of direct visuals, and because of the interviewer leading the discussion.

Still, not bad overall, and worth the listen.
 
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