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Whoa....

OK, I agree with the author of the article that these are drills that can help a shooter get better. :)

But I do -NOT- think that they are "beginner" drills, at all, especially the latter two. There's a lot of motion and speed going on with the latter two drills, and that can both be dangerous for a newer shooter as well as cause training scars when the drills are taken out of context or even executed incorrectly.

Dot-Torture is great, but the draw is an issue for newer shooters - range-rules or not. It can also be very frustrating for a newer shooter to pursue, and I strongly believe that newer shooters should receive proper coaching on how to "shoot dots" and to be able to achieve a reasonable level of accuracy/precision before undertaking this drill.

I think the drills the author mentioned are great ones to shoot,and they can certainly help a shooter - any shooter - get better...just that folks shouldn't head blindly into them or mistake them for something either that a newbie should be able to shoot, or, for that matter, something that only newbies should shoot (for one thing, Dot-Torture can humble even an experienced shooter). :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Whoa....

OK, I agree with the author of the article that these are drills that can help a shooter get better. :)

But I do -NOT- think that they are "beginner" drills, at all, especially the latter two. There's a lot of motion and speed going on with the latter two drills, and that can both be dangerous for a newer shooter as well as cause training scars when the drills are taken out of context or even executed incorrectly.

Dot-Torture is great, but the draw is an issue for newer shooters - range-rules or not. It can also be very frustrating for a newer shooter to pursue, and I strongly believe that newer shooters should receive proper coaching on how to "shoot dots" and to be able to achieve a reasonable level of accuracy/precision before undertaking this drill.

I think the drills the author mentioned are great ones to shoot,and they can certainly help a shooter - any shooter - get better...just that folks shouldn't head blindly into them or mistake them for something either that a newbie should be able to shoot, or, for that matter, something that only newbies should shoot (for one thing, Dot-Torture can humble even an experienced shooter). :)
Thanks for the feedback. What drills you recommend for beginners?
 

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I'm very, very much a craw-walk-run kind of guy..... And I tend to craw for a long time before trying to walk, whenever I try something new. :)

For beginners, I would emphasize the absolute fundamentals ...and this is something that while Dot-Torture absolutely does, it works at a level that is perhaps higher than what most beginners are ready for, and that's not just for the draw motion (which, as the author of the article noted, can be eliminated by simply having the shooter go from a low-ready, CHR, etc.), but for the fact that most beginner shooters will not understand the simple concept of how to "stay within the dot." Tell a newer shooter to shoot " the dot," and they'll aim for the dot - which then all too easily becomes a miss. ;) It's not until later that a shooter realizes that to (or is taught the trick of) stay within the bounds of "the dot," they need an even more refined aiming point inside the dot. Similarly, at 3 yards, sight picture variances can come into play, and this may also frustrate newer shooters until they are taught this consideration. For fundamentals, I honestly think there's nothing wrong at all with shooting a simple bullseye - or something else that shows the difference between a very refined aim-point versus one that's less so - all while trying to drill those cloverleaf groups. :) Add in a ball-and-dummy drill to help the shooter visualize any flinching or other craziness, and perhaps build to the canonical Bill Drill to emphasize sight-tracking and recoil mitigation.

Working out of the holster - and even moreso going back into it - I think it's vital to absolutely make sure that the beginner shooter can do this safely (both for him/herself as well as for those standing in the immediate area!) and to eliminate any errors before they can form as training scars. The simple draw-1-holster, un-timed and slow, may not be fancy or dynamic, but I think it is absolutely necessary to ingrain safety...and by doing it slow (instead of as a part of a F2S or Mozambique, for instance) we begin to build the motor program of the proper draw-stroke: burning it in right from the start.

I would also tackle the basic "emergency/speed" slide-lock reload. The stuff requiring more dexterity can come later, but this is a good fundamental to truly get the to master, as it builds not only an awareness of the state of the gun (not just that the gun is empty, but also, for-example, muzzle orientation during the reload) but also starts to work a bit of manipulations in preparation for not only those more complex reloads, but also for stoppage clearance and remediation as they advance. The 1-reload-1 is a very focused exercise, and I think very suitable for absolute beginners.

Finally, I would also absolutely drill-in administrative loading and un-loading. I really think that this is where a lot of folks go wrong, right from the git. I don't think it is productive for the newer shooter to tackle dynamic drills without him or her being absolutely solid on being able to properly make-ready the gun. Be it for competition or for defensive purposes, if that gun goes click instead of bang (or bang and then immediately click, because of a stoppage or other failure), that's really a non-starter no matter the context.

At the Alliance PD Training Facility ( Alliance Police Training | To Serve & Protect the Citizens of Alliance, Ohio - this is no joke, if looking at the facility doesn't manage to convince, check out their roster of trainers that offer classes there ), at the make-ready area, there's this sign:



^ It's there because even the true high-speed/low-drag guys an gals can get complacent and forget about these most basic things and end up committing a foul in the shoothouse in just the first seconds or minutes of their runs. I look at this video of Frank Proctor gassing-up for a stage, and I sweat the guy...I know he knows his business:


^ This video should start playing at the 0:45 mark, and Proctor completes his pre-stage by about 1:16. 30 seconds to insure that you give yourself the best odds for your mission from the start. I think that this is something that's all too often not being taught to newer shooters or is otherwise being glossed over.

And even for just a relaxing day on the range with friends and family, being certain of administrative loading and unloading is absolutely necessary for safety. :)
 

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One thing that a person can do... even at a strict indoor range... is shoot from different positions. What I mean by that is... left foot forward, right foot forward... weak side facing the target, and strong side facing the target....etc.

IMO... if you are being attacked... the chances of you being in your Weaver or Isosceles stance that you use when you target shoot is slim to none.

Just a thought. :smile:
 

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One thing that a person can do... even at a strict indoor range... is shoot from different positions. What I mean by that is... left foot forward, right foot forward... weak side facing the target, and strong side facing the target....etc.

IMO... if you are being attacked... the chances of you being in your Weaver or Isosceles stance that you use when you target shoot is slim to none.

Just a thought. :smile:
I spent most of my range time Saturday (out in the desert) - only shooting handguns while moving. I shoot way better while advancing than I do retreating. I also shoot better moving to the left than I do moving to the right. Which can only mean I need to practice more moving back and right. I’m gonna need more ammo!
 
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