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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a brand new Rock River Arms A4 Midlength (16inch barrel). I am going to change the barrel to a 20 inch chrome plated or stainless. I plan on using all the original hardware. Looking at the RRA website, it looks like I just need the barrel and gas tube since I already have a 12 inch UTG quad rail. Am I correct, or is there any other parts that I've missed.

Also, when I do change the barrel, anyone interested in a 16 inch midlength chrome moly barrel? :D
 

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By "chrome plated," I hope you mean "chrome lined." :)
 

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If you are re-using all you original pieces, then yes, the new barrel and a rifle gas tube.

Is the barrel "stripped" or does it come as an assembly? ie is there a front sight base or a gas block installed? If your old barrel has a regular front sight base, then you won't be able to re-use that.
 

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Are you sure you want to do this? Your RRA already has an superb complete upper (excellent barrel and my preferred midlength gas system) and it would be a shame to waste it. Why don't you just buy a RRA Varmint complete upper and have two guns in one? What information made you decide to make such a drastic change on a brand new rifle? You can do whatever you want of course, but I am curious.

A civilian, especially in an arid state like Texas, does not need a chrome lined barrel or stainless barrel. Just clean the bore after every shooting session and your barrel will last a long, long, long time. The chroming process can be uneven, so usually a non-chrome lined barrel (like the one you have now) will be more accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
RRA shows the new barrel assemblies as coming with the front sight.

And yes, the barrels will be CHROME PLATED. :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Are you sure you want to do this? Your RRA already has an superb complete upper (excellent barrel and my preferred midlength gas system) and it would be a shame to waste it. Why don't you just buy a RRA Varmint complete upper and have two guns in one? What information made you decide to make such a drastic change on a brand new rifle? You can do whatever you want of course, but I am curious.

A civilian, especially in an arid state like Texas, does not need a chrome lined barrel or stainless barrel. Just clean the bore after every shooting session and your barrel will last a long, long, long time. The chroming process can be uneven, so usually a non-chrome lined barrel (like the one you have now) will be more accurate.
My original plan was to buy a RRA full size A4. I already have a new RRA Entry Tactical M4 that I love! Well, I bought the UTG 12 inch Quad Rail hand guard, vertical grip and bi pod for my A4. But when my dealers orders arrived, it only came with mid length A4s. Now, I'm not the most patient person in the world, and due to the high demand or ar-15s, coupled with the fact that I already had to wait a month, and that I only paid $950 for the brand new rifle, I decided to just get the midlegnth and make it into the rifle that I wanted. Besides, I already have a RRA .308 varmint rifle with a 26 inch stainless barrel on order. Don't need two varmint rifles. :D
 

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FYI, getting the barrel off of a RRA tactical Entry is much harder that it should be. The barrel nut on mine was so damn tight, I had to buy a 1/2" socket wrench to put on the armourer's tool, and then a 4 foot cheater bar on it to get it to budge.

Also, do your self a favor and ditch the UTG rails and get a free float set up. If you still just want non-free float get something other thanthe UTG.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Also, do your self a favor and ditch the UTG rails and get a free float set up. If you still just want non-free float get something other thanthe UTG.
Why? Now I'm not much of an expert as many of the users are on here, but I find that the rails aresolidly built, don't rattle, fit snug, and I've seen almost nothing but great reviews on them. :confused:
 

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FYI, getting the barrel off of a RRA tactical Entry is much harder that it should be. The barrel nut on mine was so damn tight, I had to buy a 1/2" socket wrench to put on the armourer's tool, and then a 4 foot cheater bar on it to get it to budge.

Also, do your self a favor and ditch the UTG rails and get a free float set up. If you still just want non-free float get something other thanthe UTG.
I agree with you. This project could turn out to be worth much less than the original. I picture the upper receiver crushed or distorted in a vice. I have a UTG front sight tool that is surprisingly well made. However, I don't know if I would build my dream rifle around a UTG non-free-float quad rail. At the gunshow I went to this weekend there was UTG stuff at every other table. If I were to appraise a brand new RRA A4 middy vs. a custom job with UTG parts, the RRA middy would be worth twice as much to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I agree with you. This project could turn out to be worth much less than the original. I picture the upper receiver crushed or distorted in a vice. I have a UTG front sight tool that is surprisingly well made. However, I don't know if I would build my dream rifle around a UTG non-free-float quad rail. At the gunshow I went to this weekend there was UTG stuff at every other table. If I were to appraise a brand new RRA A4 middy vs. a custom job with UTG parts, the RRA middy would be worth twice as much to me.
Isn't that what an armors action clamp/block is for? I was under the impression that these prevent frame distortion and will help protect the finish during barrel changes. They are only 40 bucks.

Also, I would hardly classify an A4 as my "dream rifle". I just wanted a 20 inch barrel, and if the utg quads suck, I'll just toss them, I spend more on ammo during a trip at the range then the amount I paid for them anyways. Wow, people sure are touchy on this forum. :neutral:
 

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You can do what ever you want and the AR-15 is one of the best modular gun systems to modify to your every whim. It is just that you currently own my favorite brand and model of rifle and it is hard for me to imagine it being so radically altered when I consider it already perfect. I am also thinking about your best interests regarding your RRA's resale value and lifetime warranty. You can still find RRA 20" NM complete uppers (with free float tube hidden under standard-looking A2 hand guards) as they are not as popular with the tactical crowd.
 

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A civilian, especially in an arid state like Texas, does not need a chrome lined barrel or stainless barrel. Just clean the bore after every shooting session and your barrel will last a long, long, long time. The chroming process can be uneven, so usually a non-chrome lined barrel (like the one you have now) will be more accurate.
Don't know what the OP will decide to do, but I do know that my choice of going with a chrome-lined barrel (Bushy) had nothing to do with humidity. I doubt if anybody else's choice of a chrome-lined barrel had much to do with humidity, either. Chrome-lined barrels are nearly as accurate as that same barrel non-chrome-lined. I've shot some 1/2" groups with my Bushy Shorty with the chrome-lined barrel. (Barrel is free-floated; JP trigger @2.5#; my handloads, using H335 and Berger bullets.

A chrome-lined barrel will last thousands of rounds more than a non-chrome-lined barrel. As for stainless; humidity has nothing to do with anybody's selection of a stainless rifle barrel, either. Most match barrels are stainless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Don't know what the OP will decide to do, but I do know that my choice of going with a chrome-lined barrel (Bushy) had nothing to do with humidity. I doubt if anybody else's choice of a chrome-lined barrel had much to do with humidity, either. Chrome-lined barrels are nearly as accurate as that same barrel non-chrome-lined. I've shot some 1/2" groups with my Bushy Shorty with the chrome-lined barrel. (Barrel is free-floated; JP trigger @2.5#; my handloads, using H335 and Berger bullets.

A chrome-lined barrel will last thousands of rounds more than a non-chrome-lined barrel. As for stainless; humidity has nothing to do with anybody's selection of a stainless rifle barrel, either. Most match barrels are stainless.
Yes! Someone understands! :D
 

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The first post on this topic did not explain WHY the OP wanted to swap barrels on his brand new RRA midlength LAR-15. I was trying to pick his brain as to why he felt compelled to change out a brand new barrel. I was thinking that perhaps he heard that chrome lining is a military requirement and that chrome lining is a key buzzword when selecting an AR. My point was that the military's reasons for specifying chrome lining are based on different needs and conditions compared to civilians. A soldier may submerge his rifle in a river crossing, carry it in damp jungle conditions, delay cleaning it in times of battle, or store it in suboptimal non-climate controlled conditions. A civilian will generally pamper his rifle and clean it regularly. To chrome a barrel, it must be over-bored as the chroming process adds material. This added layer may or may not be the correct thickness to correct the over-bore. The chrome tends to fill in some of the rifling and can be uneven. True, a properly chrome lined barrel may last longer, but a well-maintained chromoly steel barrel will last a very very long time.

Rock River Arms has their barrels made by Wilson with a 1 MOA accuracy guaranty on the OP's model. Not many mass producers of AR have an accuracy guaranty, which speaks for the high quality of RRA barrels. I don't think it is necessary to replace the very high quality barrel on this practically unfired rifle, unless it eventually does wear out (in a few civilian lifetimes, perhaps, at today's ammo prices).
 

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The first post on this topic did not explain WHY the OP wanted to swap barrels on his brand new RRA midlength LAR-15. I was trying to pick his brain as to why he felt compelled to change out a brand new barrel. I was thinking that perhaps he heard that chrome lining is a military requirement and that chrome lining is a key buzzword when selecting an AR. My point was that the military's reasons for specifying chrome lining are based on different needs and conditions compared to civilians. A soldier may submerge his rifle in a river crossing, carry it in damp jungle conditions, delay cleaning it in times of battle, or store it in suboptimal non-climate controlled conditions. A civilian will generally pamper his rifle and clean it regularly. To chrome a barrel, it must be over-bored as the chroming process adds material. This added layer may or may not be the correct thickness to correct the over-bore. The chrome tends to fill in some of the rifling and can be uneven. True, a properly chrome lined barrel may last longer, but a well-maintained chromoly steel barrel will last a very very long time.

Rock River Arms has their barrels made by Wilson with a 1 MOA accuracy guaranty on the OP's model. Not many mass producers of AR have an accuracy guaranty, which speaks for the high quality of RRA barrels. I don't think it is necessary to replace the barrel on this basically unfired rifle, unless it eventually does wear out (in a few civilain lifetimes, perhaps, at today's ammo prices).
Dude, OCD much?
 

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Regarding humidity, it is generally not a factor in deciding barrel material (or chrome lining) for civilians. However, humidity WAS a key factor in the military's decision to chrome line barrels. A lesson learned in the Pacific War during WWII was that chrome lining the barrels of M14s decreased corrosion. The first version of the M16 did not have chrome lining. the fouling of the early M16 version (most likely due to a change in propellant and the disguided idea that the new rifle did not need cleaning) was partially blamed on the lack of chrome lining. The decision for the M16A1 (and subsequent M16A2) to have chrome lining was made during conflict in the jungles of Vietnam, which I hope we can agree is a humid place. This military's decision to chrome line is based on extreme, wet, harsh, and humid conditions. Conditions we civilians are unlikely to face. Now carry that over to some who say that since the military requires chrome lining that it should be a requirement of a civilian rifle.

For a civilian, especially one living in the desert Southwest, chrome lining to prevent corrosion is not neccessary. If you live along the brackish water of the Louisiana Bayou, it might be a factor. If your goal is ultimate accuracy, a non-chrome lined barrel would be better. 1/2 MOA accuracy is not a military requirement of the M16. For less barrel corrosion in all environments the military is willing to sacrifice some accuracy.
 

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The OP was emphatic in one of his posts that the barrel is CHROME PLATED (sic). So, he has an AR barrel, the exterior of which looks like a Chevy bumper? That's verrrry interesting. :mrgreen:
 
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