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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not new to AR15's and I'm not faithful to the 5.56, but I've never really delved into the AR10 world... I saw 16" and 18" 6.5 Creedmoor barrels at Ballistic Advantage and I'm wondering if this could be a fun future range toy (and, okay, I have to admit that the whole NGSW 6.8x51/277 Fury MCX Spear concept has peaked my interest :rolleyes: and I think a 6.5 Creedmoor rifle would offer a lot of the benefits without the huge cost or increased chamber pressure), but I've heard that AR10's have some part compatibility issues between brands and are HEAVY. Is my impression correct? Anybody have an AR10? How do you like it?
 

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No standards between makers for the .308/7.62X51 versions of the AR.

If you buy a complete rifle from a company that builds them you should be fine - unless you want to upgrade it. Then you have to make sure what aftermarket parts will fit/work in the brand of AR10 you bought.

If you build one you should do a lot of research first and find out what parts fit what rifles. Like sitting down and mapping out what triggers, barrels, bolts, handguard/free float tubes, buffer assemblies, etc. you think you want. Then spend the time (calling the companies that make these parts might be a good idea to find out what they say about their parts fitting the receiver halves you want to buy.) Arfcom would also be a source for info about what parts fit/work with other parts.

I hear good things about the SIG AR10 style rifle, but don't own one.

I have a buddy that bought a S&W .308 AR. When he wanted to upgrade some parts he found out that S&W uses some proprietary parts that kept him from buying/using some of the parts he wanted to upgrade it with. He sold it.

I bought a DPMS GII a few years back - and then they went out of business. The GII is smaller/lighter than a lot of other AR10 type rifles. Many call it a "small frame" AR10. But, uses different bolts, barrels, handguards than many AR10 style rifles. Rumor is the GII will be back since Palmetto State Armory bought DPMS (and other companies) awhile back.

Don't forget the cost of ammo. The big rifles don't use more ammo, it's just more expensive.

It could be a "journey". Good luck.
 

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I built an AR10 as my first AR. It was a tittle maddening. I wanted presidio so it had a bull barrel. Boat anchor. A little impractical. They are fun, not that complicated. As said, there is no pattern standard. DPMS or armalite. Then to complicate it further a couple new patterns to lower weight and use more AR15 parts. DPMS G2 and magpul/KC(?) Again, if you buy fine, but I assume you want to build. Go to AR308. Com for info. And yes... You have to start with light weight build to save weight. 16" is still good for performance and light profile. The barrel is the biggest weight savings... And guard.
 
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I have a 16" Daniel Defense DD5V1 (.308). It's a great gun, super-accurate. But yeah, it's heavy. The compatibility issues will rear their heads every once in a while. "Do I have an Armalite or DPMS pattern for this part?" If you build yours and plan on suppressing it, go with an adjustable gas block from the start. I use mine for hunting, and for where I'm at it's more than adequate. For all the new calibers that are supposed '308‐killers', it still does the job as it has for the last 75 years or whatever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
In terms of the weight savings, I'm looking at BA Hanson profiles since they are fairly "lightweight," but they seem to be fairly accurate (at least their 5.56 is with match ammo). I'm just shocked that AR10 Hanson is 38.8 oz which is around the weight of a 5.56 HBAR! Maybe I should go with a .308 on second thought too because half my center-fire rifles use .30 cal bullets (including a bolt actoin .308 Win)...

Are AR15 triggers typically drop in? The goal would be a precision rifle and while Milspec's are fine for a lot of uses, but obviously a nice two stage would be better.

@MrBoxx, good point on the gas block... I've used buffer weights to tune the recoil on the AR15 platform, but I'm assuming that is a different animal on the AR10...

I was planning on using Aero's M5 platform since it is fairly affordable and not overly priced; the handguards are also on the lighter-weight side without being too pricey.
 

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In terms of the weight savings, I'm looking at BA Hanson profiles since they are fairly "lightweight," but they seem to be fairly accurate (at least their 5.56 is with match ammo). I'm just shocked that AR10 Hanson is 38.8 oz which is around the weight of a 5.56 HBAR! Maybe I should go with a .308 on second thought too because half my center-fire rifles use .30 cal bullets (including a bolt actoin .308 Win)...

Are AR15 triggers typically drop in? The goal would be a precision rifle and while Milspec's are fine for a lot of uses, but obviously a nice two stage would be better.

@MrBoxx, good point on the gas block... I've used buffer weights to tune the recoil on the AR15 platform, but I'm assuming that is a different animal on the AR10...

I was planning on using Aero's M5 platform since it is fairly affordable and not overly priced; the handguards are also on the lighter-weight side without being too pricey.
Here's the thing, you really need to figure out what you want to do with it. If you want a precision rifle, get a bolt action. You are talking heavy barrel profile, big glass, heavy stock... Why do you need a precision large frame auto? Unless you earn your money sitting in a sniper hide... heavy autos are impractical. You can get a precision bolt for a fraction of the cost and weight.

If you want a large caliber auto for plinking and critters... cool. #08 isn't cheap plinking ammo, but OK. But now precision doesn't matter. you get the lightest 16" barrel profile and guard, skeleton stock, 1x6 and you are set for fun or serious business. But those two are very different things.

All AR triggers drop into AR10s. Most all lower parts do except take down pins. Buffer systems are where it gets a little nuts, and what mag pattern to use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Here's the thing, you really need to figure out what you want to do with it. If you want a precision rifle, get a bolt action. You are talking heavy barrel profile, big glass, heavy stock... Why do you need a precision large frame auto? Unless you earn your money sitting in a sniper hide... heavy autos are impractical. You can get a precision bolt for a fraction of the cost and weight.

If you want a large caliber auto for plinking and critters... cool. #08 isn't cheap plinking ammo, but OK. But now precision doesn't matter. you get the lightest 16" barrel profile and guard, skeleton stock, 1x6 and you are set for fun or serious business. But those two are very different things.

All AR triggers drop into AR10s. Most all lower parts do except take down pins. Buffer systems are where it gets a little nuts, and what mag pattern to use.
"Precision" may have been the wrong word, mea culpa... I understand what true precision shooting is and what true precision rifles are, but I meant precision as a relative term. My version of precision is around 1-2 MOA, which still benefits from a nice crisp two stage. I've heard of some tactical-style rifles shooting 3-4 MOA (the Tavor 7 reportedly is around 3 MOA), whereas being an AR platform, I'm expecting better than that (BA has a sub-MOA guarantee on their barrel for example). I guess the idea of a non-intermediate cartridge in an AR style rifle has peaked my interest as a range toy, but that being said, I don't want to own a boat anchor either.
 

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I agree with Powerman, and unless you buy match grade ammunition you can forget about ultra precision. AR 10's can beat up glass if they are not tuned right or the scope is not strong enough.
That being said I have an AR 10 and love it. I got a Diamondback DB 10 for cheap used. I changed a few things. I upgraded the trigger to a Timney single stage 4# pull. I got it because while most AR 15 triggers will drop in I read sometimes you can get light primer strikes with some ammo. The Timney is specific for the AR 10 platform. I was getting light primer strikes with the stock trigger but after the Timney I have had zero, even with the cheap Russian ammo and its way better. I upgraded the barrel to a BA because the stock one had accuracy issues. it shoots softer because the BA barrel has the proper size gas port. I also added a linear compensator and did notice it is quieter on the range. Hogue finger grip, Magpul stock, Radian Raptor LT charging handle, UTG backup sights and angled fore grip. I just put a Vortex Strikefire 2 on for a sight. It is by no means a precision rifle but great when you want a little more heft for close to medium range its the way to go. I got a bunch of plinking ammo before the ammo shortage when it was much cheaper. It does do better with match grade but for long range I have a Savage 30-06 with a cheap Bushnell optic. It was under 500 total and will run circles around my AR 10 for accuracy.
There are a lot of differences and incompatibility issues with the AR 10 platform. IMO it is much easier and cheaper to make a AR 15 platform for a precision auto. I know this is a long read but hopefully this info will help you.
Edit: it took me a year to type this and you posted before I had responded. When I had a 1-10 power scope on this I could get the accuracy you want with match grade ammo even with the single stage trigger. I was getting about 2" groups at 100 yards. Its not a boat anchor but definitely stout fully loaded. Match grade ammo is expensive and the 1-10 scope made it hefty so I decided to go a different route.

 

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"Precision" may have been the wrong word, mea culpa... I understand what true precision shooting is and what true precision rifles are, but I meant precision as a relative term. My version of precision is around 1-2 MOA, which still benefits from a nice crisp two stage. I've heard of some tactical-style rifles shooting 3-4 MOA (the Tavor 7 reportedly is around 3 MOA), whereas being an AR platform, I'm expecting better than that (BA has a sub-MOA guarantee on their barrel for example). I guess the idea of a non-intermediate cartridge in an AR style rifle has peaked my interest as a range toy, but that being said, I don't want to own a boat anchor either.
Well to be clear, I never said they were not fun. So... Sorry to fans, but M1As are nothing fancy. Very heavy, and VERY expensive to get accurate. Cool as hell, but that is not the point. The AR platform is by far easier to make accurate and a comparison of parts availability and diversity would be absurd. So I went with AR10. Having said that, rifles are easy to make light, it is the 5 more pounds of crap we put on. Pretty much any AR10 with glass is heavy... again, the barrel. There is nothing heavy in the receiver vs AR15. LPK is the same. Buffer and stock can be the same... It is the carrier, barrel, and guard that are bigger... not to mention the mag full of ammo. What is on a AR15... Red dot? A 308 with glass is heavy... and that again is without even talking about a bipod....

So... leave the 308 for fun. Any real accuracy is better served with a bolt. And a fun AR10 can still be very accurate with a good barrel. The Army did a test and found a 18" barrel to be perfectly acceptable ballistics for 308. A light profile is your friend, and it will still probably be better than a decent M1A. AR Performance was making a light weight AR10 like the DMPS G2... both were not much more than AR15s. So if you want to have fun, then make it fun... maneuverable and light. It will still be minute of man at 600 yards.
 

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Sort of paraphrasing what Powerman has been saying collectively, while I LOVE shooting my DD5V1, it is NOT the rifle I would take on a long hunt, to a precision rifle match, or even in a WROL/SHTF situation (maybe that one under certain circumstances, though... fun to think about). For those reasons, I'm in the market for a long-range precision rifle to either hunt with or take to a rifle match if I ever get the opportunity to do so. The AR10 and .308 will DO these things, just maybe not as well as a precision rifle in 6.5CM/ARC/PRC/etc or a lightweight hunting rifle in .308, 6.5, 6.8, etc. But if you have the means, budget, and drive to build an AR10, then absolutely do so: they're a hoot to shoot. But you may find yourself a year or two down the road realizing it's not doing everything you want it to do and if it's a picky eater, you may find yourself troubleshooting at the bench more than sending lead downrange.
 

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Don't know what my GII weighs. I did change the railed handguard as I like the gas block to be protected/under the free float tube. It also has an adjustable gas block that it probably didn't really need. I've found I like the length/fit/feel of the older A1 style stocks and have put them on several 18" barreled AR15's and even one 16" barreled AR15. The scope is a 1X6 from Primary Arms.

It shoots soft enough I can put my nose on the charging handle like it was a .223 AR15. No issues with recoil. The Pmags work fine in it, too.



Pick it up one handed by the pistol grip and it feels heavier than a 16" .AR15 in .223. Get both hands on it and the change in balance/feel makes you think it's an AR15.
 

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Don't know what my GII weighs. I did change the railed handguard as I like the gas block to be protected/under the free float tube. It also has an adjustable gas block that it probably didn't really need. I've found I like the length/fit/feel of the older A1 style stocks and have put them on several 18" barreled AR15's and even one 16" barreled AR15. The scope is a 1X6 from Primary Arms.

It shoots soft enough I can put my nose on the charging handle like it was a .223 AR15. No issues with recoil. The Pmags work fine in it, too.



Pick it up one handed by the pistol grip and it feels heavier than a 16" .AR15 in .223. Get both hands on it and the change in balance/feel makes you think it's an AR15.
Same... Tuned right they are pussycats. They are definitely all day fun guns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
12 lbs is a little heavy for my taste, but not too bad considering the described config. I might just wait to see if the GII comes back or maybe even checkout PSA. I've never owned one, but the price is hard to argue with on this specific item...
 
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