Springfield XD Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
461 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since the .38 / .357 Shotshells from CCI are no longer available I am going to load some. Anyone ever do this? Pitfalls? Helpful tips?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,473 Posts
I did this a long time ago just to experiment. I can't remember the shot size I used, but probably 7 1/2. I think I used some Unique based on the weight of the shot column, so depending on what powder you have just weigh whatever fits in and adjust the powder charge to match.

What I did was take a fired case and sharpen the mouth on a scissors grinder, but any small stone or dremel will probably do. You sharpen the OUTSIDE of the case mouth, not the inside, by rotating it against the spinning grinding wheel. Then I took the cardboard from a new dress shirt (I suppose you could buy some thin posterboard or something) and cut out wads using the sharp mouth of the case and a small hammer with the cardboard laying on a piece of soft wood (a piece of 2X4 if I remember correctly). The wads will "stack" in the case and when you fill it up you can use the hole where the primer was removed (or drill it larger if you want) and using a piece of wire force the wads out of the case. Then using other cases suitable for reloading (not the sharpened one... hey, just being thorough!), you put some powder in, then a wad or two (depending on the thickness of the wads) over the powder, then fill the remainder of the case with shot up to about 1/16" from the top or so... you will have to experiment, and then a wad over the top of the shot. Then you apply a heavy ROLL CRIMP over the wad. If you did it right the wad will be held in place by tension between the shot and the roll crimp and you can try out the pattern on a target. These are only good for 2-3yrds or so generally, but see what you get on the target for a pattern. This is the way the old paper shotgun shells were made and it worked pretty well for a 38 shotshell too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,742 Posts
What???? JUst some guy? To load up 410 shot shells, he will need a shot shell press and use shotshell loading data which is obtainable on the web. It is a whole different setup and your method could lead this OP astray. I load 12 ga and it's a whole new game.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,371 Posts
What???? JUst some guy? To load up 410 shot shells, he will need a shot shell press and use shotshell loading data which is obtainable on the web. It is a whole different setup and your method could lead this OP astray. I load 12 ga and it's a whole new game.
They aren't talking about Shotgun shells. Pistol shot shells..:grin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
461 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
They aren't talking about Shotgun shells. Pistol shot shells..:grin:
bingo...thought the description gave that away. I have the blue plastic shot holders from Speer. Have all the load data. Wanted to know if anyone had done this and if they had any advice on things to look out for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,473 Posts
I have never loaded "handgun" shotshells with those fancy shot holders like from Speer. I would hope that Speer would have that data in one of their manuals, though I don't have mine in front of me. You might go to their site and post a request for some information about them. The same thing would apply though. The weight of the shot column and expected velocity will be the deciding factor as to how much powder you can use. With those I would think a mild TAPER crimp would be more in order as you don't want to crush or cut them. The force of the propulsive gases breaks them up and launches the shot column.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
461 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have never loaded "handgun" shotshells with those fancy shot holders like from Speer. I would hope that Speer would have that data in one of their manuals, though I don't have mine in front of me. You might go to their site and post a request for some information about them. The same thing would apply though. The weight of the shot column and expected velocity will be the deciding factor as to how much powder you can use. With those I would think a mild TAPER crimp would be more in order as you don't want to crush or cut them. The force of the propulsive gases breaks them up and launches the shot column.
Yes, load data is included for about half a dozen different powders. Crimping and seating is probably going to be a bit of trial and error.

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,371 Posts
From what I read (you sparked my curiosity) taper crimp is the way to go. Roll crimp will crack the capsules. And people can't get good velocity out of them without spreading the pattern to much to be effective. Max effective range of about 1 - 2 yards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,742 Posts
My mistake, when I read the title my brain thought it was loading shotshells for the "Judge". I blanked out the 38/357. My comment can be disregarded. Sorry for the error.:oops:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,197 Posts
The older Speer manuals have data, but effectively, weigh the cup & shot, use any data that meets the weight. A slight roll crimp will hold fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,473 Posts
The older Speer manuals have data, but effectively, weigh the cup & shot, use any data that meets the weight. A slight roll crimp will hold fine.
A roll crimp you say? So you're saying you want them to more or less separate at the crimp line to disperse the shot?

Please elaborate.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top