Springfield XD Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,851 Posts
Nope. The cost is pretty dang low. It looks MPI tested individually which is good. But doesn't show that it was HP tested.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,690 Posts
Since a .300 Blackout uses the same BCG as a 5.56/.223, why would they list it as a .300 Blackout BCG? I'm also curious about Radical Firearms' general quality. Their barrel prices are ridiculously low. Anybody know anything about them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,583 Posts
Since a .300 Blackout uses the same BCG as a 5.56/.223, why would they list it as a .300 Blackout BCG? I'm also curious about Radical Firearms' general quality. Their barrel prices are ridiculously low. Anybody know anything about them?
.300blk marked would presumably give the user "bigger balls" and can offer more "knockdown power" at the range shooting paper then the one marked standard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,690 Posts
Thanks for the clarification. So far, the two that I'm using are working great. It'll be interesting to see how they look after a few thousand rounds.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
128,172 Posts
I have encountered no issues at all with NiB BCGs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,851 Posts
I think 99 percent of people won't have issues with coatings. But I think for a lot of people 1% is still too great a risk. I've never minded just soaking my bcg and taking brushes to it. Not for NIB coatings, and not against it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,171 Posts
Says here the flaking and debonding from the parent surface is typically because some coaters were being cheap- and/or dumb-asses.

Slick new bolt carrier groups from Ares Armor and Lantac USA

For what it's worth, I bought a 1st-gen Spike's Tactical NiB BCG and still don't have any issues with it.

But you know them internetz stories... beats firsthand experience every time. :lol:
It is still an external coating that will eventually wear to the base material. It relies on 'high spots' to reduce friction and has absolutely no 'self lubing' properties. Once those high spots wear off, friction increases and you basically have a nickle coating. NiB also has the same corrosion resistance as common electro nickle/chrome plating and will not stand up to salts very long.

NiB is one of the best marketing ploys to get you away from your money since the mil-spec became common verbiage with fire arms. NP3 contains PTFE and is self lubricating with twice the corrosion resistance, and NP3 Plus is 10 times more corrosion resistant then NiB. Nitride offers reduced friction from making the base metal nonporous, and as slick as glass. It acts almost like stainless steel as far as not 'staining'. It also beats out NiB in corrosion resistance by a far measure and is the only form of coating that does not change external dimensions. It is also repeatable in thickness.

NP3 is the ONLY coating that can run without lubrication. PTFE is non stick, so it doesn't carbon foul like NiB or phosphate will. Its eaier to clean because, nothing sticks to it. Nitride is easier to clean because it's as smooth as glass. NiB carriers still need oil. They don't act much different then phosphate BCGs when ran dry. Sure you will get more rounds before it 'locks up', but it needs oil run. It is basically one step up from phosphate.

NiB is nothing more then bling....
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top