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I was at Wal-mart today in the shooting section. I saw this pair of earbuds ---SSI micro hearing enhancement and protection. I have never seen anything like this product before. They look like little hearing aids and even have batteries in them. It says it enhances sounds but also gives you noise supression at 85DB. They were about $28. How does this thing work? Is it what i need for hearing protection at the shooting range as an alternative to ear muffs, or am i out in left field and this is strictly for hunting and does nothing for hearing protection? The packaging sucked, it didnt explain anything about them and their website sucks also, doesnt even have the model wal mart carries on it.
 

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Never heard anything about them. After blazing away at a deer with my .44 magnum without ear protection and not being able to hear for a week, I started carrying muffs.
 

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I just bought a set at Academy today. I'll try to get to the range over the next couple of days and see how they compare to regular plugs and to my electronic muffs.
 

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Don't waste your money. These things are meant to enhance ambient sound while muffling loud noises like a firearm. Manufacturers have been able to do a good job of doing this with earmuffs for fairly inexpensively (google "Howard Leight Impact.") The miniaturized, hearing aid sized ones are garbage, that is, unless you want to pay a couple thousand for a good set.
 

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Don't waste your money. These things are meant to enhance ambient sound while muffling loud noises like a firearm. Manufacturers have been able to do a good job of doing this with earmuffs for fairly inexpensively (google "Howard Leight Impact.") The miniaturized, hearing aid sized ones are garbage, that is, unless you want to pay a couple thousand for a good set.
oh the molded ones. molding are 400, anolog 700 and digital was like 1400 they are coming down.:rolleyes: if they were cheaper I'd have a set for afghanistan for being in the turret. as is I'll stick with my surefire ep4s they work great.

I suggest ep4 surefires. if they don't fit get ep3s.
 

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I have some Walker's Game Ear headphones that I use on the range. They are about $85.00 and work really well at listening to sounds at normal volumes and blocking out any loud noises. They are just about worthless while hunting because you can't tell from which direction game sounds are coming.
 

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I would be very very suspicious of any in the ear hearing protection that only costs 28 bucks, the custom fitted ones start around 1500 bucks and you need an LEO discount to get that price.

Another tipoff of a bogus product is the claim of an 85 db supression level, that just isn't possible. The finest over the ear muffs only come in at 30 db of supression and I'm not aware of any in the ear custom fitted jobs that even match that.

Bottomline, make sure to take some muffs with you to the range when you try them out, I expect you'll need them.
 

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I received some caldwells for Christmas. When at the indoor range they were hurting my ears each time a gun was shot. These not a good ear protection?
Caldwell E-MAX Low Profile Electronic Earmuffs (NRR 23dB) Green - MidwayUSA

The Winchester ear muffs black from Walmart were inexpensive and seem to work.

But I am looking for a decent pair of muffs that dont cost an arm and leg. Slim and electronic and reliable. Thought I found that with the caldwells. What are the numbers for protection?
 

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IMO the numbers you want to look for are in the 27-30 db range, which you won't find in any inexpensive electronic muff. However you can find them in passive hearing protection for about 40 to 50 bucks. For indoor ranges I use the passives and also use the cheap in the ear expanding foam plugs.

For outdoor shooting, 24 db is fine, because you don't have the factor of reflected sound coming back at you. This means that the lower cost electronics are suitable for shooting at an outdoor range. However, another factor to consider is the response time of the particular unit, most of the low cost electronics don't have a great response time, so you'll get some exposure with every shot fired.

Basically, you get what you pay for. IMO the cheap units are really only suitable for Hunting where you're not actually doing much shooting. I wouldn't use them for a range session because you may get too much exposure. If you want electronics for range use, plan on spending at least 200 bucks and I would also suggest the use of foam ear plugs.

BTW, I go to sleep and wake up every day with ringing in my ears, so I know first hand the importance of hearing protection. Unfortunately, I learned that lesson a bit too late.
 

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I go to sleep and wake up every day with ringing in my ears, so I know first hand the importance of hearing protection.

You and me both, brother! Mine was combat related.
 

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85DB NRR? Not even the most expensive plugs have that rating.
 

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Peltor makes a good set of muffs I think they are called tactical sports. I was talking to a buddy at the range and he heard my stomach growling while people were shooting:shock: He also heard me having a normal conversation with my other buddy from about 100 feet away. They are like 100 bucks or less.
 

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See, maybe I'm reading too much into this but those that you suggest, are 20db. It seems the more I look into ear muffs, the ones that are more expensive have less db reduction.

Peltor TacSport Muffs $(document).ready(function() { if (typeof(fm) != 'undefined') { fm.breadcrumb("104792580|104769180|104381280|"); } });, Hearing Protection & Enhancement, Shooting Accessories, Shooting : Cabelas.com

^ I'm a complete noob to all of this, so I researched for a bit, before buying.

Apparently, although the NRR ratings are a set standard by the EPA, there's some flexibility in how the manufacturers may "interpret" this standard - so that may also impact what you see listed in the ads.

Also, just because a set of earmuffs cost more doesn't necessarily mean that they'll offer more protection. For the "cup" designs, a lot of the noise-reduction capability has to do simply with how much sound-deadening material there is, and that translates to both a larger cup size and a more bulky shape. A slimmer one or a "chopped cup" - be it for aesthetic preference or mounting a rifle - will decrease the amount of insulation available, and will cut NRR. Additionally, price-increasing features such as MP3-player AUX-IN plug or stereo (safe-)sound amplification - the former a nice thing to have if you're solo at the range for an extended period of time, and the latter great for both conversations as well as hearing range commands - may not necessarily coincide with a high NRR.

So, what I - a complete noob - did, was to try a couple of different things.

I bought a couple of different mid-priced electronic cups: the Caldwell E-MAX Low Profile (NRR 23) and the Howard Leight Impact (NRR 22) to satisfy my desire to be more aware of my surroundings (hearing range commands and conversation) as well as given that these wouldn't take up much space in my shooting bag.

And I also bought a couple of the SureFire EP-series "Sonic Defenders" (which use the Hocks Noise Breakers, at NRR 24).

I'm an indoor range shooter, and what I eventually ended up with was dual-layering a SureFire EP-4 (it turns out my ear canals are rather large) underneath one of my powered earmuffs. Yeah, I might be a wimp (actually, I have fairly high tolerances for noise, too many rock concerts and still a louder car :lol: - yes, I know, I'm gonna go deaf, early), but I'm *very* comfortable, even with the loudest cannons barking in the adjacent stalls. The dual-layering also allows me the ability to take off my earmuffs when I want to take off my pullover fleece or sweater, without having to leave the stalls.

I still lust after a set of Pro Ears, but they're pricey, and my layered combo offers versatility. :)

Finally, remember: what may be more than sufficient protection on an outdoor range may not work nearly as well indoors.
 

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oh the molded ones. molding are 400, anolog 700 and digital was like 1400 they are coming down.:rolleyes: if they were cheaper I'd have a set for afghanistan for being in the turret. as is I'll stick with my surefire ep4s they work great.

I suggest ep4 surefires. if they don't fit get ep3s.

+100

If you don't have the funds for any electronic ear pro go with the Sure Fire ep3/4's I love my ep3's though I've never used them for indoor shooting but doubling up with muffs is never too much, but for outdoors it's very nice. You hear regular conversations perfectly, but your voice sounds a little muffled.
 

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^ Glad to be of-service. :)

What I really want to do is to go to an outdoor range and try out the EP4 and EP3. From all accounts, it seems that they'll definitely be sufficient in such an environment.
 
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