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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just wanted to know if anybody has any suggestions other than the shoot-n-c targets I could use for my son who has very poor eyesight and even though he enjoys shooting, he gets frustrated because he has real problems seeing his hits. I've tried the flourencent yellow silouettes and bright blue but fear he is losing interest in going to the range with me. I just joined this forum today so hopefully I posted this in the right place. Thanks in advance for any suggestions you may have!
 

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My guess is you are looking for an alternative to the expensive targets. Does he do well with the shoot-n-c type targets? If so, maybe there is a way to make them yourself. I have NO idea how they make them, but mayhaps you could take the neon yellow paper, and coat it with some kind of weak latex paint? Just talking out of my bottle here, but if they can make them, I'm sure you could do an equivalent!
 

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Found this googling:
"I use Tempura paint on cardboard using a bright color. Then when dry cover it with package tape then cover with black Tempura. When hit the black shatters off and leaves the bright color behind that is held in place by the tape. Check it out."

Someone else suggested spraypainting wax paper plates for the same effect.

I think you could get a huge roll of wax paper for a very cost-effective base medium for the tempera paint.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Great suggestion! I didn't think about making my own... Appreciate the feedback.
 

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Does the range allow falling, spinning or gong type steel targets? Also, with paper, make 'spotting' part of the fun. The non-shooting partner uses a scope or binoculars (don't need real expensive for most pistol distances) to call the shot hits and talks the shooter onto target. Then switch places. Since spotting with a visual aid and depending on your partner for target data is now a central part of the activity, he would not be singled out as needing assistance and keeps active whether shooting or spotting. No need for him to read his own target.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Thumper - another great suggestion. It's not about the price of the targets but rather getting him more involved like you said. I guess I could always use a larger caliber gun that makes bigger holes :)

Maybe the Mossberg I just got will do the trick ;)
 

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You need to tell your son to learn patience. "Seeing" where the last shot fell leads to chasing the as you mentally try to account for the last shot being off. Just aim every shot to the bulls eye and check when done.

If he can't wait, cheap binocs
 

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You need to tell your son to learn patience.
Oh, that's fine advice...except to someone who has lived with a serious handicap for a while. Let me tell you from experience-it gets tremendously frustrating at times when even the most simple of tasks becomes difficult. Learn patience? It's easy to say that, isn't it? Walk in his shoes first. Better he will be impatient enough to fight and overcome the problem. And he will.

Making your own "splash" targets sounds about as expensive as buying them. Check out the Dirty Birdy targets. You can get them at Wal-Mart and Dicks (among other places), and they're about half the price of Shoot-n-C.
 

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I have very limited vision myself and the suggestion of aiming at the bull every time and checking after, is what I do. I have a fair amount of trouble on indoor ranges because most are very dark, so I use the cheap torso silhouettes and always aim center mass, and do very well. On a long gun it is imperative that I use optics.

Since you didn't mention it, I assume your son is shooting a small bore rifle. Have you thought about a very hi powered scope and maybe a laser? Sounds like price isn't a factor so you may want to look into some combo like that.

If it's any consolation, tell your son there are lots of us out here who have disabilities in one form or another and still enjoy shooting sports. Good luck.
 

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I have fairly poor eyesight, it's normally correctable with glasses but I cant use sights very well so I normally end up shooting without them and I know his frustration.
someone suggested pop cans and fruit (good visual aid).
someone else suggests drop targets, gongs, and spinners (good visual and audible aid).
for me, I did get discouraged for years and only shot if I had a scope but that helped me to develop the "shoot a few mags and then check more closely when you change the target" mentality. now that I'm into pistol shooting I'm used to shooting then checking.

so maybe he just needs to develop a good rifle range mentality before he really gets into pistols. also you could try shooting balloons, very cheap and very visible
 

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Oh, that's fine advice...except to someone who has lived with a serious handicap for a while. Let me tell you from experience-it gets tremendously frustrating at times when even the most simple of tasks becomes difficult. Learn patience? It's easy to say that, isn't it? Walk in his shoes first. Better he will be impatient enough to fight and overcome the problem. And he will.

Who pissed in your wheaties, Mr Sarcasm?


The OP stated NOTHING about the son having a handicap - serious or otherwise. Just not able to see the small holes in the target WHILE SHOOTING and that was frustrating him.

I happen to have piss poor eyesight - without glasses I can't see the REAR sight much less the front sight or the target. Even across the room it's tough to determine bad guy from background without the glasses. With glasses I can barely make out the front sight, but only when using the bifocal reading section. And know from experience that my groups tightened way up when I stopped trying to SEE where the last round landed. Lifting my head and craning my neck around trying to determine where the hole landed ruined my ability to make a tight group. And when I was able to determine where the miss was, that just lead to wider and wider spreads as I chased the bull around. When I got the patience to shoot a mag's worth THEN check the target, the groups shrunk, my frustration dropped, my confidence and enjoyment both went way way up.

I'm just glad that there was person with the wisdom to tell me to just settle down and not worry about where the holes are landing until AFTER finishing the mag. --- and not you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I really do appreciate all of the good ideas put forth as I never thought about the balloon or pop cans as well as the metal target suggestion where he could hear a "ding" when he hit it. My biggest problem is using the indoor range as I have yet to find a nice secluded place to shoot outdoors safely. If anybody has any suggestions on where to go in the surrounding Seattle area please let me know.
 

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Hi Shepp3rd!

I do have poor sight too, my solution when i'm shooting 22, 223 or 9mm is to use binoculars, nothing fancy. Just shoot 3 to 5 shots and ckeck where I placed them and readjust accordingly. Indoors range should have no problems with that!

It also helps to have paper targers with red markings/print over white background. To me, the holes look better than targets with the black coloring marks/signs over white background!!

Cheers!!!
 
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