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Ok so long story short. I sold my Remington AR-15 for $700 at a gun store today and put the cash towards a layaway on used (but never fired) S&W AR-15. I was looking at the rifle today and decided to inspect the in and out before telling them it was the one I wanted. I remember cocking the rifle a few times but never pulling the trigger. Between the time I have to wait now because I just bought a handgun (MD requires atleast 30 days between regulated firearm purchases) and having to save the remainder of the cash up. It may be up to 90 days before I pick the rifle up. Maybe i'm just crazy but it is driving me mad knowing that the trigger might be cocked. I am worried because of the long wait before i'll get to pull the trigger, the trigger being cocked may be wearing the spring down. Am I over reacting? Would I sound like a nut calling the gun shop and asking them to check the trigger? I don't want to end up having to get the trigger replaced in a $1000 gun a few days after I get it. Let me know what you think. Thanks.
 

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Yes...I had no idea you could "leave a trigger cocked" and that it would hurt the spring and I have a S&W M&P 15...Makes sense but I guess i never really thought about it. Wonder if mine is "cocked" right now.
 

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Ok so long story short. I sold my Remington AR-15 for $700 at a gun store today and put the cash towards a layaway on used (but never fired) S&W AR-15. I was looking at the rifle today and decided to inspect the in and out before telling them it was the one I wanted. I remember cocking the rifle a few times but never pulling the trigger. Between the time I have to wait now because I just bought a handgun (MD requires atleast 30 days between regulated firearm purchases) and having to save the remainder of the cash up. It may be up to 90 days before I pick the rifle up. Maybe i'm just crazy but it is driving me mad knowing that the trigger might be cocked. I am worried because of the long wait before i'll get to pull the trigger, the trigger being cocked may be wearing the spring down. Am I over reacting? Would I sound like a nut calling the gun shop and asking them to check the trigger? I don't want to end up having to get the trigger replaced in a $1000 gun a few days after I get it. Let me know what you think. Thanks.
You are worrying for nothing! You could leave it cocked for 100 years and it would not harm the springs!

don
 

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Man that is crazy with the 30 day restriction. If it is bad thing then my xd's are in trouble because they are always cocked & loaded, think I'll go fling some lead tomorrow just to make sure, hasnt made a difference in several years tho.
 

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Quality springs wear from movement, not compression.
 

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What was wrong with the Remington (Bushmaster)??? Just curious. And no, leaving the hammer cocked for 100 years won't hurt anything.
 

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I have seen old guns that have belonged to late relatives that had been cocked for years with no problems.

Most of the time, when I put my guns up though I make sure they're uncocked. Force of habit I guess. But not exactly required.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
What was wrong with the Remington (Bushmaster)??? Just curious. And no, leaving the hammer cocked for 100 years won't hurt anything.
Nothing wrong with it. It was a remington r-15 (non-bushmaster) the barrel was a 22" which was a little longer then I wanted. It also had about a 12" steel free float which made the gun pretty heavy. The bushmaster and s&w I held were much lighter.
 

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Nothing wrong with it. It was a remington r-15 (non-bushmaster) the barrel was a 22" which was a little longer then I wanted. It also had about a 12" steel free float which made the gun pretty heavy. The bushmaster and s&w I held were much lighter.
I don't believe that Remmy ever made an AR. It was made by Bushmaster and a Remmy label stamped on it. I also doubt that the free-float tube was steel. I'd prefer the Bushy to the S&W, but there's really not a lot of difference in ARs. ;)
 

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I don't believe that Remmy ever made an AR. It was made by Bushmaster and a Remmy label stamped on it. I also doubt that the free-float tube was steel. I'd prefer the Bushy to the S&W, but there's really not a lot of difference in ARs. ;)
Why would you prefer the Bushmaster. Unless you are talking about the new "sport" model, S&W M&P15s have better specifications for comparably priced models.(Using MSRP). Exactly what is your rap on S&W, just curious.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I don't believe that Remmy ever made an AR. It was made by Bushmaster and a Remmy label stamped on it. I also doubt that the free-float tube was steel. I'd prefer the Bushy to the S&W, but there's really not a lot of difference in ARs. ;)
I was always told the Remington and Bushmaster was one in the same. Not true? As far as the free float goes I would be shocked if it was aluminum, the tube was pretty heavy. The overall weight of this rifle unloaded was just shy of 8lbs. I was leaning a little more towards the bushmaster but I didn't like the fixed sights. The S&W was used but never fired (I checked the carrier bolt and didn't see a single mark on it, compared to my R-15 which had been taken to the range once and had clear signs of being fired) had the picatinny hand guard i've always wanted, holo sights, 16" barrel, and the guy threw in 4 mags. The gun cleary needed a little oil but overall I thought it was a great buy.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Why would you prefer the Bushmaster. Unless you are talking about the new "sport" model, S&W M&P15s have better specifications for comparably priced models.(Using MSRP). Exactly what is your rap on S&W, just curious.
I had an opportunity on Saturday to hold both a bushmaster(standard with fixed carry handle and one with a rail system on top) and an M&P15 this weekend. Not bashing the bushmasters at all, they were very light weight and felt very nice in my hand, but I felt for the price I got a lot more with the M&P. Had the M&P not been used though it may have been out of my price range the MSRP was almost $1400 and may have ended up buying the bushmaster which was a great buy at only $950.
 

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I had an opportunity on Saturday to hold both a bushmaster(standard with fixed carry handle and one with a rail system on top) and an M&P15 this weekend. Not bashing the bushmasters at all, they were very light weight and felt very nice in my hand, but I felt for the price I got a lot more with the M&P. Had the M&P not been used though it may have been out of my price range the MSRP was almost $1400 and may have ended up buying the bushmaster which was a great buy at only $950.
I know it has been overplayed here and elsewhere and many laugh when you mention "The Chart" BUT there is useful information there for those trying to decipher what they are buying. It is not a bible but merely a comparison tool and a very useful one at that.

S&W M&P15s have enough superior components compared to Bushmaster that PRICE would be the only reason to prefer the Bushy, all else being comparable (general configuration). Superior components make a superior rifle. There are rifles with superior specs to S&Ws but Bushmaster certainly isn't one of them. A 1400 dollar S&W is a Tactical model , probably with troy free float and BUIS. Again, not a stripped M4 clone. You are getting a superior rifle, IMHO. Can't speculate to the price because buying from a retail shop is often more expensive than an online purchase but that too has it's advantages. Face to face expertise and having someone to go to with a problem is worth something too, especially for non expert (most of us) buyers.
 
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