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Discussion Starter #1
Just got back from the range and I am perplexed. No matter what I do I keep hitting about an inch or 2 below dead center even though I am aiming dead center. I am not sure if it is something I am doing, or if it is the sights. I have heard of Hi8's (I think that is what they are called) that have a higher front sight that makes you bring your shot group up.

Anyone heard of these, or have any other suggestions???


Thanks in advance.


Dave

Edit: I am posting this in the XD section because it is the XD I am shooting while this is occuring. :wink:
 

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dbrownusarmy,

First of all, you didn't mention if you were shooting from a rested position or not. If not, try shooting from a sandbag rest and see where you're grouping. If you still group low, then you need a lower front sight, not a higher one. If adjusting the front sight, a higher sight would lower the muzzle even more, while a shorter front sight would raise the muzzle.

With rear sights, you move the sight the way you want to bullet to move, so you would raise the rear sight to raise the impact of the bullet. just the opposite of the front sight.

If you're not still shooting low from a sandbag rest, then it's either your sight picture (the way you're looking at the sights in relation to the target) or something else, like anticipating the shot.

It's common for shooters to shoot low at short distances when they look at the target instead of the front sight. Looking at the target makes some people unconsciously move the sights out of the way so they can see the target better, which places the shots low on the target. You have to concentrate on the front sight when shooting, as the front sight determines where the bullet is going to impact, if the gun is sighted in correctly.

You also didn't mention what caliber your XD is. Some guns are very sensitive to bullet weight. Generally, lighter bullets impact lower, below the point of aim, while heavier bullets tend to impact higher. You might try changing the weight of bullet you're shooting, if all else fails.

Hope this helps.

Fred
 

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Discussion Starter #6
ReloaderFred said:
dbrownusarmy,

First of all, you didn't mention if you were shooting from a rested position or not. If not, try shooting from a sandbag rest and see where you're grouping. If you still group low, then you need a lower front sight, not a higher one. If adjusting the front sight, a higher sight would lower the muzzle even more, while a shorter front sight would raise the muzzle.

With rear sights, you move the sight the way you want to bullet to move, so you would raise the rear sight to raise the impact of the bullet. just the opposite of the front sight.

If you're not still shooting low from a sandbag rest, then it's either your sight picture (the way you're looking at the sights in relation to the target) or something else, like anticipating the shot.

It's common for shooters to shoot low at short distances when they look at the target instead of the front sight. Looking at the target makes some people unconsciously move the sights out of the way so they can see the target better, which places the shots low on the target. You have to concentrate on the front sight when shooting, as the front sight determines where the bullet is going to impact, if the gun is sighted in correctly.

You also didn't mention what caliber your XD is. Some guns are very sensitive to bullet weight. Generally, lighter bullets impact lower, below the point of aim, while heavier bullets tend to impact higher. You might try changing the weight of bullet you're shooting, if all else fails.

Hope this helps.

Fred
WOW, that is a lot of good information!

First, I am not shooting from a rested position, and at the range that I shoot at that would be hard to do. But I will see what I can do about that.

Also, I just thought about it and you are 100% correct, lowering the fron sight would force me to bring the barrel up, thus raising my shot.

I am shooting 9mm, and what I think I am doing is looking at the target, and moving the front sight down to better see the target. That makes a lot of sense and I wouldnt doubt if that is what I was doing.

I am a new shooter and I still anticipate recoil a tad bit, but I a getting better. So I think that may still have a little to do with it. But I figure the more I practice the less I will anticipate the recoil. And thats why I am going back to the range tomorrow to shoot the 200 rounds I didnt get to today.

I will let you know how it turns out tomorrow, and thanks for the great info, I am sure it will help out!!!!

Dave
 

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dbrownusarmy,

I just got back from teaching a handgun safety course, which is required for a CCW permit here. It's very common to have this problem when first starting out, or even for someone who has shot for years and years, but never had any good instruction.

Another thing new shooters have a tendency to do is squeezing the whole hand while firing the shot. You want a firm, steady grip, and just move the trigger finger straight back to fire the shot. If you squeeze the whole hand, a right hand shooter will have a tendency to place the shots low and left, and a left hand shooter to place the shots low and right.

You can try this yourself with an unloaded gun. Place the sights on a spot and try dry firing by just moving the trigger finger. The sights should stay on target. Now try it by dry firing and squeezing the whole hand. You'll notice that as the other three fingers tighten, they pull the sights off target.

Keep practicing and keep asking questions. There is nothing else that requires the same hand/eye coordination that pistol shooting does, so you have to work to make your brain and muscles understand what you want them to do. Just remember to watch the front sight, as that determines where the bullet impacts.

Hope this helps.

Fred
 

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Another trick I learned is to paint out the front sight dot. Sometimes shooters try to line up the dots instead of shooting the front sight. It has worked for me, a little magic marker and voila! FWIW Semper Fi
 

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Just a thought but I've found in my case that 115gr. shoots a little low for me, while 124 gr. is right on.
 

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What does your sight picture look like? Using the top of the front post and rear blade or the {worthless} dots?

Sounds as if you might be "mashing" the trigger? {Almost everyone does this to some extent} Do you "Dry Practice"? Serious shooters do this almost every day. It is an easy way to diagnose some of the problems that occur from trigger control. Place all you focus & concentration one the front sight and notice what it does when the sear breaks. Should be virtually no movement at all. You will see it dip if you are mashing.
Remember the axiom "Aim small, miss small"? Try using the smallest aiming point {on the target} you can easily see at a given distance and get your breathing settled in the same for ea. shot.
Invest in a can of "sight black" for your practice sessions, 3-dot sights just do not cut it for accuracy work.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you all again for your guidance!!

I went back to the range this evening and made sure I wasnt dropping the front sight down when aquiring my sight picture, and it worked. I kept the front sight on the center of the target and nailed it everytime. I shot out to 30 feet with out a problem.

Thanks again for everyones input.


Dave
 

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c22m22c said:
don't forget about that "six o'clock hold" phenomenon. my 2 cents
 

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