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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so i bought my first xd today, a used sa-xd 40 subcompact and took it to the range. It shot great my 1st mag(20 yrds) then seems like after tht my accuracy went to SH**...???? has n e one had this problem? or have tips?
 

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what hand/eye dominance are you? and how are you missing? generally is the shooter in relation to the trigger pull of this firearm. Also if you search the forums their is a target to use, which will tell you what your most likely problem is rather then answer the questions i posed.
 

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sry i should have given a lil more info. Im right eye dom and i have a good trigger squeeze i learned to shoot in the army 11b, im not great but i can shoot a riffle pretty good. And i really dont think its me.n e way i shot my 1st mag in a 6in target(all hits). then after tht i was all over the board aiming at a 12 in target and not even hitting it, with no pattern at all ??
 

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I call this the "shooter's press", the harder a shooter tries to hit the target the worst the results get. Without watching you shoot, here is what my experience tells me might be the problem. 1-move in closer until you get used to trigger break on the gun you are using 2-once results start to fall below expectations, most all shooters begin to tense up causing the grip to be to tight, trigger control suffers, sight picture becomes inconsistent in an effort to compensate and breath contol goes out the window.

None of these issues may be noticeable to the shooter. The easy solution is to put the gun down, relax and refocus on the basics of handgun shooting. Hope this helps a some. Good luck.
 

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Anticipation.
Your first mag was accurate because you were still being surprised by the trigger break. Once you learned about when the shot would fire you began anticipating the break and began flinching. I do it all the time, with a new pistol I don't know when the break will happen and I can bullseye everything. Once I get used to it I have to fall back on trigger discipline to get back on target.

Pistols are really nothing like rifles, I'm a crack shot with any of my long guns but I still struggle with pistols.
You'll get it. Keep reading and keep practicing.
Welcome to the forum and to the XD family.
 

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sry i should have given a lil more info. Im right eye dom and i have a good trigger squeeze i learned to shoot in the army 11b, im not great but i can shoot a riffle pretty good. And i really dont think its me.n e way i shot my 1st mag in a 6in target(all hits). then after tht i was all over the board aiming at a 12 in target and not even hitting it, with no pattern at all ??
After ten years in the infantry (and counting) I can attest to the fact that the Army's handgun training is crap. I was reading through the most recent SMCT and was appalled that it still teaches the "cup and saucier" grip and weaver stance. The Army does teach rifles well, but that's apples and oranges. I hate to admit it, but the best handgun instruction I ever received was from a retired Air Force Raven.

I would recommend having a very experienced handgun shooter test it and see how they do. I also agree with the comments on shooting at 7 yards before moving that far out.
 

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20 yards is a stretch for a pistol with a 3" barrel to begin with. Although SA subs are super accurate. I have SUB 9 and it shoots almost as accurate as my XD Service beyond 10 yards. But you really need to practice the distances it's intended for.

3, 7, and maybe 10 yards. Then for fun move out to 15 and beyond.

In my OP the only reason to shoot 15 and beyond is if you are wanting to shoot competitions or just for fun to see how accurate you can be in the marksmanship aspect of pistol.

It's a CC pistol for self defense. You should learn to shoot fast accurate shots at those distances.

Learning the break of the trigger and using proper grip you should be able to achieve some very accurate rapid fire.

Thumbs forward grip technique is the best grip you can learn in my opinion. It really helps you achieve becoming a mechanical extension of the gun and really controlling the recoil for real fast follow up shots accurately.

This has been my experience when I switched and got pretty good with it. Before I was one second intervals between shots. Now I can hit tighter center mass groups rapidly and accurately.
 

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I love this video.


 

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Bz, while doing my research on the XDM line, especially on the XDM 9mm 3.8 Inch Subcompact/3.8 9mm, a video blogger suggested that the sight picture was in a 6'Oclock position.

If you go here to the Springfield Site and open/download the manual there is nice explanation on page 40, point of aim (sight picture).
 

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Bz, while doing my research on the XDM line, especially on the XDM 9mm 3.8 Inch Subcompact/3.8 9mm, a video blogger suggested that the sight picture was in a 6'Oclock position.

If you go here to the Springfield Site and open/download the manual there is nice explanation on page 40, point of aim (sight picture).
Actually the XDM is POA=POI. The XD line is 6 O'Clock= POI. But depending on ammo this can change.

The OP has an XD Sub Compact not an XDM Compact. The XDM 3.8 with the shorter grip is not a sub compact. It's a compact because the barrel is almost 4" long.

Subs are pistols with barrels not over 3".


XD manual.

Point of Impact
Shooters may use a “point of aim” sight picture at 25
yards (See Figure 40-1). This means that, at 25 yards, the
bullet should impact the target at the point visible at the
top of the front sight. Shooters may also use a “6 o’clock”
sight picture to strike the center of the target. Springfield
Armory® firearms are designed to use the “6 o’clock” sight
picture at 25 yards (See Figure 40-2)
. However, some
firearms may shoot “point of aim” at 25 yards depending
on shooter and ammunition. Changing brand or type of
ammunition may alter point of impact.

http://www.springfield-armory.com/download.php?asset=XDManual.pdf


XDM manual.


Point of Impact
Shooters may use a “point of aim” sight picture at 25
yards (See Figure 34-1). This means that, at 25 yards, the
bullet should impact the target at the point visible at
the top of the front sight. Springfield, Inc. firearms are
regulated to shoot point of aim, point of impact.
Changing
brand or type of ammunition may alter point of impact as
well as shooter's technique.

http://www.the-m-factor.com/html/XDmSAFETYMANUAL.pdf



But again bullet weight and type this can change as well as shooter technique. As described.

We've had a lot of new XD and XDM shooters shoot low and left becuase of technique in grip and trigger control.
 

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do what the navy does, start off at 3 yards, if everything falls into center mass move it to 7, when everything falls into centermass at that range move it to 15, once you get everything into the center at that ranger, then move it to 20 and let er rip. there would be no reason that a gun would shoot well for 20 then go to hell unless you suffered major damage to your firearm. also the M9s you are used to shooting are completely different animals and take a little getting used to, when I first bought my XDM45 the only pistol I had any real trigger time with was the M9 and I could barely hit a 6" by 10" sheet of plywood at 20 yards when I first shot it. now I'm hitting centermass at 25 and as soon as I get some more leave my goal is to get centermass at 35 yards.
 

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Don't take that the wrong way. I'm just trying to help as well Buz.

People tend to get confused on this subject.
 

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Anticipation.
Your first mag was accurate because you were still being surprised by the trigger break. Once you learned about when the shot would fire you began anticipating the break and began flinching. I do it all the time, with a new pistol I don't know when the break will happen and I can bullseye everything. Once I get used to it I have to fall back on trigger discipline to get back on target.

Pistols are really nothing like rifles, I'm a crack shot with any of my long guns but I still struggle with pistols.
You'll get it. Keep reading and keep practicing.
Welcome to the forum and to the XD family.
That describes my issue exactly. As I was going through my gun course the first few rounds were on target, no issues. Then I would over think the aiming and then try to anticipate the bang sensation (I was using a Taurus Millennium Pro PT111) . My instructor realizing all this let me shoot a 357 and by watching the action, along with the weight of the gun allowed me to shoot with amazing accuracy, with no flinching. He used snap caps to see what I may be doing and it was clear I was dipping the muzzle down in anticipation of the bang.


My next class session I shot the XDM 9mm 4 inch and the XDM 5.25 with the 5.25 inch barrel with no issues. For my last class I bought the XDM 9mm 3.8 inch subcompact and found myself flinching again. I was pretty disappointed with myself as it impeded the 'full' completion of my course. I did get my certificate, but I felt my marksmanship was sub-par. My instructor encouraged me to get some range time in with the gun, then send him an email and he'd open up a time for us to get back on the range (essentially to complete the course, properly).


I would have purchased the 5.25, but I really wanted a conceal carry weapon. Its going to be a matter of dry firing and mental discipline to get through this. I'm a novice gun owner so I'm hoping I can get through this awkward mental laps.
 

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Don't take that the wrong way. I'm just trying to help as well Buz.

People tend to get confused on this subject.
Understood, I'm completely new to all this so ego isn't an issue, I really want to learn and the best way to do that is to listen to people with experience. ;)
 

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That describes my issue exactly. As I was going through my gun course the first few rounds were on target, no issues. Then I would over think the aiming and then try to anticipate the bang sensation (I was using a Taurus Millennium Pro PT111) . My instructor realizing all this let me shoot a 357 and by watching the action, along with the weight of the gun allowed me to shoot with amazing accuracy, with no flinching. He used snap caps to see what I may be doing and it was clear I was dipping the muzzle down in anticipation of the bang.


My next class session I shot the XDM 9mm 4 inch and the XDM 5.25 with the 5.25 inch barrel with no issues. For my last class I bought the XDM 9mm 3.8 inch subcompact and found myself flinching again. I was pretty disappointed with myself as it impeded the 'full' completion of my course. I did get my certificate, but I felt my marksmanship was sub-par. My instructor encouraged me to get some range time in with the gun, then send him an email and he'd open up a time for us to get back on the range (essentially to complete the course, properly).


I would have purchased the 5.25, but I really wanted a conceal carry weapon. Its going to be a matter of dry firing and mental discipline to get through this. I'm a novice gun owner so I'm hoping I can get through this awkward mental laps.

Good on you for taking a course. I would suggest try learning the thumbs forward technique. And dry fire practice with snap caps is a really good idea to help with your trigger control.

I'm no expert. But it has helped me a great deal in achieving what I feel is above average for shooting rapid fire accurately.

I can say that with confidence.

Most average folks at the range I encounter are 1 second or more between shots. And uaually the ones that attempt rapid fire have poor grip and trigger control and end up all over a man size sheet of paper.

If they are doing that poorly on a stationary target. Imagine a real life scenario with a moving target. :shock:

It's extremely important to be able to get the rounds off quickly and accurately. But you have to have the right techniques down first and it took me awhile.
 
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