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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been trying to shoot 230 gr. lead round nose in my .45 XDE. After about 30 to 40 rounds, it won't consistently go into battery. The bullets are commercial hard cast, not having leading problems.
I have about 1000 200 gr SWC I want to shoot, but I think I have a tight chamber in this particular gun.
Both types of ammo cycled with no problems in a 1911.
Anyone else having this problem?
 

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Not the same bullet, but I shoot a lot of 155 gr LSWC through my XDS and do not have this issue. Definitely a different bullet shape though.
 

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If there is a step before the nose starts to Curve, try seating your bullet a few thousandths deeper. That may solve the problem.
 
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EDC Springfield XDE 45. Beretta PX4 40 and 45, Compact 9mm. Sig P-220 10mm, NAA 22-mag revolver.
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If there is a step before the nose starts to Curve, try seating your bullet a few thousandths deeper. That may solve the problem.
Please explain what you’re saying here….


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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sometimes, cast bullets made with a small shoulder just behind the forward part of the bullet, like this:
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He is referring to that small shoulder behind the RN section, that might be interfering with chambering once the barrel gets fouled. His suggestion was to make sure to have the bullets seated to a depth that would keep that shoulder from protruding from the case mouth.
If you just shoot jacketed round nose bullets, they are completely smooth and won't have this possible issue.
 

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EDC Springfield XDE 45. Beretta PX4 40 and 45, Compact 9mm. Sig P-220 10mm, NAA 22-mag revolver.
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306 Posts
Sometimes, cast bullets made with a small shoulder just behind the forward part of the bullet, like this:
View attachment 847506
He is referring to that small shoulder behind the RN section, that might be interfering with chambering once the barrel gets fouled. His suggestion was to make sure to have the bullets seated to a depth that would keep that shoulder from protruding from the case mouth.
If you just shoot jacketed round nose bullets, they are completely smooth and won't have this possible issue.
Ah, ok.


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