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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got my very first 1911, a cheap ATI FX45 Military version. I really love how it sits in my hand, and have enjoyed it for the past 2 days in the range. I think I'm in love with the 1911 platform... it makes my XDM feel like a toy.

Anyway, the reason I am here is because I want to ask a question. All my brass are dented on the lip, 300 rounds (Federal bulk, Herters, Tula)... all dented. They all land behind me, sometimes at 5 o'clock, and sometimes on my face :grin: .

Anyway, are the dented cases normal or my 1911 is faulty?



Thanks
 

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The dents are caused by the brass impacting the edge of the ejection port. You may find brass marks where they hit. It's not a big deal if you don't reload as the brass is softer than the steel slide so it won't hurt the gun.

If you want to prevent it you have to change the ejection angle or slide speed. Different weight springs will affect slide speed and reshaping the face of the ejector will change the angle but make sure the extractor isn't clocking. A longer ejector can along resolve it by starting the rotation of the brass earlier. Erratic ejection is often a sign of a clocking extractor.

As mentioned, if the gun is functioning and you don't reload then it's not a big deal.
 

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DirtyRod is spot on. Youre fine, but I wouldnt want erratic ejection, with some to the face. This would be my route to happyland.

1. Profile ejector
2. Profile and tune extractor
3. Grab an 18# spring (Id bet the one in there is nowhere near 18#)
4. Lower/flare ejection port

Id monitor after each modification. If 1-3 is done properly, 4 wont be needed.
 

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Some of mine do it too. Zero problem for me...and I do reload.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks all for the input. I will look into it.
 

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The dents are caused by the brass impacting the edge of the ejection port. You may find brass marks where they hit. It's not a big deal if you don't reload as the brass is softer than the steel slide so it won't hurt the gun.

If you want to prevent it you have to change the ejection angle or slide speed. Different weight springs will affect slide speed and reshaping the face of the ejector will change the angle but make sure the extractor isn't clocking. A longer ejector can along resolve it by starting the rotation of the brass earlier. Erratic ejection is often a sign of a clocking extractor.

As mentioned, if the gun is functioning and you don't reload then it's not a big deal.

One of the best responses to a technical question I've seen in a long time.
 

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I own several Colt 1911 type pistols.

Over the years, only the Series 70 showed the problems you describe.

We replaced the ejector with a Commander ejector - didn't solve the problem.

We replaced the recoil spring with a stronger spring and now only occasionally get a slightly dented case mouth.

On the other hand, my new Series 80 had a very short/weak recoil spring in it when I bought it (new) and it never dented the case mouths.

Multiple causes for the issue. Work through the list posted above.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
just to update the thread, and for future 1911 newbies like myself...


I went with the easiest option first..

Wilson Kombat #18 spring and a Shok Buffer = Win !!!

The dents are now very minimal, some brass don't get dented.
 

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Part of the reason most modern pistols save the GI versions have a lowered and flared ejection port. Seldom dented brass and less chance of a stove pipe.
 
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