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Ok I saw some where, that a person was asking about bullet weights and twist ratio. I email Stag Arms this morning about it. Stag emailed me back in two hours and said this, what I asked along with the reply.

I have a Stag 2T with a 1/9 twist rate, what bullet weights can I use with this rifle?



Richard Conrad


Richard,

You can shoot 40-70 grain bullets with your rifle. If you have any further questions please contact us again.

Customer Service
Stag Arms
860-229-9994 x2

 

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You can fire them all. But when you start to get 70 grains and above it won't stabilize as well as a 1in 7 twist, so your groups will be larger. I prefer 1in7 because it seems to work best overall.

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Wait, I'm under the impression that heavy bullets benefit from less aggressive rifling, and that 1:9 was better for heavier bullets than 1:7, but not necessarily great for light bullets at the lower end of the velocity spectrum.
 

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Keep in mind it's not really a function of bullet wieight--it's more a function of length (and while the two usually go together, it ain't always true).

I've found that my 1:9's do better with 55gr and heavier, with a sweet spot in the mid to high 60's (69gr SMK's work beautifully).

I've never really gotten optimal results with 40 or 45gr bullets in my 1:9 rifles, though. They work, but accuracy suffers. The same for the 75gr or heavier choices...they shoot OK, but aren't as accurate.
 

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Keep in mind it's not really a function of bullet wieight--it's more a function of length (and while the two usually go together, it ain't always true).

I've found that my 1:9's do better with 55gr and heavier, with a sweet spot in the mid to high 60's (69gr SMK's work beautifully).

I've never really gotten optimal results with 40 or 45gr bullets in my 1:9 rifles, though. They work, but accuracy suffers. The same for the 75gr or heavier choices...they shoot OK, but aren't as accurate.
My 1:9 seems to like the 55's the best...of pretty much any brand. I agree, I tried the 45gr and accuracy was not so good, and over 62gr with mine and accuracy again goes down hill...lots of load working and shooting and got me a 55gr load that I am very happy with that beats all the others I loaded. :D

Something else to be aware of...not sure if you load your own or not...but if you do, watch your OAL. Heavy bullets are typically longer and will not fit your mags and usually require to be fired single shot "style"....
 

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Good info (and opinions) here

:: Ammo Oracle

In general, 1-9 will accomodate most but the heaviest loads and is better than 1/7 for light, "varmint" type weights like 40 or 45. Above 70, the 1/7 is superior. Those heavier loads are expensive and used mostly by Police and Military. Typical 55 grn. like XM 193 5.6 do fine with either.
 

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Although I've built a couple of ARs with 1/7 barrels, I will never shoot a bullet heavier than 69 grains. I'm sure a 1/9 would have served my purposes well, also.
 

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The heaviest I've shot out my Stag Arms 2H is a 62gr. Mainly around here where I live, all we can get is usually 55 gr. No issues with any of it. Brass or steel case, shoots it all. Gotta love the Stag.

Stay Safe.
 

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1:9 all but 70 or more grains for best performance (heavier tends to be less stable)

1:8. pretty much everything (my brother can stack 3-75 grainers in 3/8" at 100 yrds)

1:7 everything over 60+ grains (tends to overstabilize very light rounds)


Vietnam was 1:12...you can pretty much shoot anything out of a 1:9 or tighter...but specific grain weights tend to work better with particular twist rates.
 

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I have some 70gr TSX, and barnes wasn't kidding when they say 1:8 or faster. 1:9 colt HBAR was all over the target at 100yds.
 

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1:9 all but 70 or more grains for best performance (heavier tends to be less stable)

1:8. pretty much everything (my brother can stack 3-75 grainers in 3/8" at 100 yrds)

1:7 everything over 60+ grains (tends to overstabilize very light rounds)


Vietnam was 1:12...you can pretty much shoot anything out of a 1:9 or tighter...but specific grain weights tend to work better with particular twist rates.

It's amazing how the twist rates have changed. Stoner designed the gun with a 1:14 twist originally and now we are at 1:7
 

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You have to remember that some of the reasoning for using the original M16 in Vietnam was that in "close in jungle warfare" , tumbling bullets inflicted more damage. Snipers and long range marksmen still had M14s issued.

I can remember being told about the "tumbling bullet advantage" of the relatively impotent M16 rounds when I was still training with the M14. This was in 1966. Was the twist rate intentional for that reason? I really don't know but clearly remember the complaining about giving up the M14s.
 

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There's no instant solution to the question.

You have to try the round in your barrel and see. It has nothing to do with weight and everything to do with length.

A lighter copper bullet or a heavier lead bullet, they'll both be pretty similar in length. There's also barnes banded solids which are 45gr but longer than a normal 55gr FMJ.

There's also the barrel its self, some can handle heavier and some can't. Buy a box of ammo you're curious about and see how it does. I wouldn't recommend buying a crate full of mk262 though.
 

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You have to remember that some of the reasoning for using the original M16 in Vietnam was that in "close in jungle warfare" , tumbling bullets inflicted more damage. Snipers and long range marksmen still had M14s issued.

I can remember being told about the "tumbling bullet advantage" of the relatively impotent M16 rounds when I was still training with the M14. This was in 1966. Was the twist rate intentional for that reason? I really don't know but clearly remember the complaining about giving up the M14s.
I read an article once that described the twist rate differences like this: the 1/14 twist gave the tumbling effect which caused greater damage, however the claimed downside was that, since the bullet isn't spinning and traveling nose-first in the proper manner, the bullet has a tendency to lose a lot of accuracy once it makes contact with brush, small tree limbs, etc, which you are obviously firing through a lot if you fight in the jungle. the 1/12 twist solved the problem of maintaining accuracy through the bush, but sacrificed stopping power since the bullet is no longer tumbling.

it has been a while since I read that, so I could be remembering things wrong, but I think that is the jist of it. someone please correct me if I am talking out my caboose.
 
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