what does bullet grains mean?

Discussion in 'The Ammo Can' started by brandon14295, Dec 15, 2004.

  1. Dec 15, 2004 #1
    brandon14295

    brandon14295 XDTalk 100 Member

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    im such a newb when it comes to guns, so what does the number of grains mean on a bullet, and whats the difference between different ones?

     
  2. Dec 15, 2004 #2
    willbond

    willbond XDTalk 500 Member

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    It is the weight of the bullet in "grains". One grain is about 65 milligrams (I've heard, someone correct me if I'm wrong). :)
     
  3. Dec 15, 2004 #3
    Old School

    Old School Super Moderator Staff Member Supporting Vendor

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    Something to note. The heavier the bullet, the less recoil too. As an example 115g 9mm has more of a pop than 147g 9mm. This is why I plan to reload with 147g bullets.
     
  4. Dec 15, 2004 #4
    C.H.Luke

    C.H.Luke XDTalk 100 Member

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    Willbond is quite correct.

    1 grain equals 64.8 milligrams.

    "Grains" is a measure of weight. So is "Grams" but they are not the same. 1 gram = 15.4324 grains.

    1Lb. equals 7,000 grains.

    So in ounces a 230 gr. bullet weighs..... :shock:

    "An ancient unit which was originally based on the weight of a grain of wheat. The grain is the smallest unit of weight in the avoirdupois, troy, and apothecaries systems. Surprisingly it is identical in all three systems."
     
  5. Dec 15, 2004 #5
    DanaT

    DanaT XDTalk 100 Member

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    Old School,

    I beg to differ unless you mean a "dopwn loaded heavier bullet will have less recoil".

    Try going out with say a 357Mag. Fire a 125 grain bullet at 1400ft/sec. Now fire a 158gr at 1400ft/sec. I promise you will notice the 158gr a WHOLE lot more.

    Basically, felt recoil is a function of energy. Remember high scholl physics. For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. I don;t care how you make 400ft/lbs of energy, it will have the same recoil (if fired in the same weapon, etc) as any other load with 400ft/lbs. Bump that to 600ft/lbs and you have 50% more recoil.

    Basically, the morepower, the larger the recoil.


    If you hypothesis were true, a 230gr 45 would kick less than a 147gr 9mm. Just not true.
    -Dana
     
  6. Dec 15, 2004 #6
    KoG

    KoG XDTalk 100 Member

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    I must agree with DanaT on that one as well. It's much easier to fire 300 Gr. .50AE bullets than 350+ Gr. bullets. Maybe there is a point where bullet weight takes on the opposite effect?
     
  7. Dec 16, 2004 #7
    ichy_trigger

    ichy_trigger XDTalk 10K Member

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    Grains in weight not to be confused with grains in volume as is the way black powder is messured[/quote]
     
  8. Dec 16, 2004 #8
    JimLongley

    JimLongley XDTalk 500 Member

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    .5257142oz, give or take... :shock:
     
  9. Dec 16, 2004 #9
    thirdtimesthecharm

    thirdtimesthecharm XDTalk 500 Member

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    phones ringing....hey jim its for you,..... its NASA
     
  10. Dec 16, 2004 #10
    skygun9

    skygun9 XDTalk 100 Member

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    It's simple, more grains=bigger entry wound, less grains=smaller entry wound.

    As for what happens after a larger heavier or smaller lighter round/bullet enters a body at a certain velocity, no one can say for absolute sure due to the amount of factors influencing the round's behaviour.

    If you want it dead for sure, use a big gun with a big bullet :wink:
     

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