what does bullet grains mean?

Discussion in 'The Ammo Can' started by brandon14295, Dec 15, 2004.

  1. brandon14295

    brandon14295 XDTalk 100 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2004
    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    amarillo, tx
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    im such a newb when it comes to guns, so what does the number of grains mean on a bullet, and whats the difference between different ones?
     
  2. willbond

    willbond XDTalk 500 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Messages:
    539
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    OKC
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    It is the weight of the bullet in "grains". One grain is about 65 milligrams (I've heard, someone correct me if I'm wrong). :)
     
  3. Old School

    Old School Super Moderator Staff Member Supporting Vendor

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2003
    Messages:
    8,908
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Illinois
    Ratings:
    +7 / 0
    Something to note. The heavier the bullet, the less recoil too. As an example 115g 9mm has more of a pop than 147g 9mm. This is why I plan to reload with 147g bullets.
     
  4. C.H.Luke

    C.H.Luke XDTalk 100 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    Willbond is quite correct.

    1 grain equals 64.8 milligrams.

    "Grains" is a measure of weight. So is "Grams" but they are not the same. 1 gram = 15.4324 grains.

    1Lb. equals 7,000 grains.

    So in ounces a 230 gr. bullet weighs..... :shock:

    "An ancient unit which was originally based on the weight of a grain of wheat. The grain is the smallest unit of weight in the avoirdupois, troy, and apothecaries systems. Surprisingly it is identical in all three systems."
     
  5. DanaT

    DanaT XDTalk 100 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2003
    Messages:
    471
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Colorado
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    Old School,

    I beg to differ unless you mean a "dopwn loaded heavier bullet will have less recoil".

    Try going out with say a 357Mag. Fire a 125 grain bullet at 1400ft/sec. Now fire a 158gr at 1400ft/sec. I promise you will notice the 158gr a WHOLE lot more.

    Basically, felt recoil is a function of energy. Remember high scholl physics. For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. I don;t care how you make 400ft/lbs of energy, it will have the same recoil (if fired in the same weapon, etc) as any other load with 400ft/lbs. Bump that to 600ft/lbs and you have 50% more recoil.

    Basically, the morepower, the larger the recoil.


    If you hypothesis were true, a 230gr 45 would kick less than a 147gr 9mm. Just not true.
    -Dana
     
  6. KoG

    KoG XDTalk 100 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2004
    Messages:
    278
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Reno, Nevada
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    I must agree with DanaT on that one as well. It's much easier to fire 300 Gr. .50AE bullets than 350+ Gr. bullets. Maybe there is a point where bullet weight takes on the opposite effect?
     
  7. ichy_trigger

    ichy_trigger XDTalk 10K Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2004
    Messages:
    10,954
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Dayton, Ohio
    Ratings:
    +27 / 0
    Grains in weight not to be confused with grains in volume as is the way black powder is messured[/quote]
     
  8. JimLongley

    JimLongley XDTalk 500 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2002
    Messages:
    821
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Allen, TX
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    .5257142oz, give or take... :shock:
     
  9. thirdtimesthecharm

    thirdtimesthecharm XDTalk 500 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Messages:
    647
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    PHX, AZ
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    phones ringing....hey jim its for you,..... its NASA
     
  10. skygun9

    skygun9 XDTalk 100 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2004
    Messages:
    293
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    San Diego, California
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    It's simple, more grains=bigger entry wound, less grains=smaller entry wound.

    As for what happens after a larger heavier or smaller lighter round/bullet enters a body at a certain velocity, no one can say for absolute sure due to the amount of factors influencing the round's behaviour.

    If you want it dead for sure, use a big gun with a big bullet :wink:
     
  11. NExd

    NExd XDTalk 1K Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2004
    Messages:
    1,546
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Land of pretentious, viperous, rancorous little, l
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    smaller bullet = faster velocity
     
  12. C.H.Luke

    C.H.Luke XDTalk 100 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    Isn't felt-recoil used generally as a subjective term?
     
  13. Old School

    Old School Super Moderator Staff Member Supporting Vendor

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2003
    Messages:
    8,908
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Illinois
    Ratings:
    +7 / 0
    Felt recoil is certainly subjective. As for my comments, they may lack science.

    That said, all of the guys who I have spoken with about reloading 9mm suggest I load with a 147g bullet, because the heavier bullet helps reduce recoil. Is this true?
     
  14. C.H.Luke

    C.H.Luke XDTalk 100 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    “.... suggest I load with a 147g bullet, because the heavier bullet helps reduce recoil. Is this true?"

    This type discussion usually revolves around meeting a particular Power-Factor. If so, you generally get noticeably lighter "felt" recoil with a heavier bullet at the same PF. {vel. x bullet wt. in gr.}

    In other words, a heavier bullet at lower velocity will have less "recoil" than a lighter one at a higher velocity, using the same powder while both satisfy the same relative PF level. This does not take into account that some powders, due to their burn rate and composition, lend themselves better to "soft" shooting loads in a given caliber &/or bullet weight than others.
     
  15. Old School

    Old School Super Moderator Staff Member Supporting Vendor

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2003
    Messages:
    8,908
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Illinois
    Ratings:
    +7 / 0
    This is great information. Thanks!
     
  16. kaschykb

    kaschykb XDTalk Newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2004
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    MI
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    So what's the normal grains of powder in a 9, .40, .45 etc round? I was raised on blackpowder. How does this compare to modern ammunition?

    And.... just what is +P and +P+ ?
     
  17. DanaT

    DanaT XDTalk 100 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2003
    Messages:
    471
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Colorado
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    You can't say what a "typical load" is. It depends upon powder and bullet. For example, I have loaded 357 from 6 grains to 20 grains of powder.

    As far as +p that is "+ pressure". Or a higher pressure round as defined by industry standards (SAAMI). A +p+ is a round that is beyong industry standard pressures.

    -Dana
     
  18. jpxj94

    jpxj94 XDTalk 100 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2004
    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Houston,Tx
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    I am sorry I couldn't resist, this is just funny to me
     
  19. Hawaii-5-O

    Hawaii-5-O XDTalk Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2004
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Hawaii
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    Kaschykb,
    I'm kinda technical and love to play with numbers.

    For 9mm reloading the amount of powder needed depends on type of powder you want to use and the bullet type and weight. Different powders will give you a variety of velocities, CUP and muzzle energy.

    Example for 9mm 125gr LRN bullet 4.9gr of Alliant's Bullseye powder will give you 1165 ft/sec, 32,100 PSI and about 377 ft lb at the muzzle.

    You will note that using heavier bullet weights will affect the amount of powder recommended. Example: For a 147gr XTP bullet the max charge is 4.2gr of Bullseye for 1,010 ft/sec, 32,900 PSI and 340 lt lb energy.

    Also found out that standard loads for 9mm Luger is under 35,000 PSI. +P loads is a cartridge that exceeds 35,000 PSI. Not sure at what pressure it would be considered +P+.

    Still learning more about reloading and trying out various powders. :D

    PS to Old School,
    Here's a formula I found for calculating recoil:
    Recoil Energy in Foot Pounds = (Bw Mv + 4700 Pw)^2) / 4.348 Gw

    Gw = Gun weight in pounds
    Bw = Weight of ejecta in pounds
    Pw = powder weight in pounds
    Mv = muzzle velocity in feet per second

    Example: For a S&W 500 Magnum (gun weight 5 lbs) firing a 440gr bullet with 38gr of powder with a velocity of 1654fps: Recoil would be 52 lbs.! :shock:

    To calculate various recoils suggest inserting this formula into an Excel spreadsheet. Then you can change the four variables to see if you have more or less recoil.

    Keith
     
  20. Dr4Pcs

    Dr4Pcs XDTalk 100 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    Messages:
    177
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Lynchburg, VA
    Ratings:
    +2 / 0
    Oh....My poor spinning head.

    And to think, I used to love math.

    Hey 5-O, what part of Hawaii?
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

bullet grain

,
bullet grain explained
,
bullet grains
,
bullet grains explained
,
difference in bullet grains
,
grain bullet
,
grain in bullets
,
grain of a bullet
,
grain of bullets explained
,
grains in bullets
,
what does bullet grain mean
,
what does grain mean in a bullet
,
what does grain mean in bullets
,
what does the grain number of a bullet mean
,
what does the grain of a bullet mean
,
what is a bullet grain
,

what is bullet grain

,
what is grain in a bullet
,
what is the difference in bullet grains
,
what is the grain of a bullet