Ria/citadel 1911 recoil spring # ??

Discussion in 'M1911' started by YoopermikeXDM, Feb 5, 2012.

  1. YoopermikeXDM

    YoopermikeXDM XDTalk 4K Member

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    Im just curious if any of you know roughly what the poundage is on the stock RIA /Citadel 1911's are?? I had bought my wife a Taurus 1911 and it is a jam o matic and would not fully cycle the slide. Untill I swapped out the recoil spring out of my Citadel... then it worked flawless! My RIA and Citadel 1911s have a MUCH lighter guide rod/recoil spring. Any thoughts?? Im planning on upgrading one of my 1911's and using that stock spring in my wifes Taurus.
     
  2. Cuda66

    Cuda66 XDTalk 10K Member

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    18#, iirc
     
  3. XDM bitone 40

    XDM bitone 40 XDTalk 1K Member

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    In 45acp 18# and 9mm 16#
     
  4. ETexPops

    ETexPops XDTalk 1K Member Founding Member

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    When you start lowering the recoil spring; you might need to lower the mainspring as well.
     
  5. YoopermikeXDM

    YoopermikeXDM XDTalk 4K Member

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    Ive already clipped a coil off the mainspring.
     
  6. jacqueeagonsr

    jacqueeagonsr XDTalk Newbie

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    Before one starts messing with springs, it's best to get the firearm functioning properly as it comes from the factory. When Browning invented the 1911, it was designed to shoot 230 grain hardball ammo at 830-850 fps. (I'd have to go look it up for accuracy.) So, we have basic physics. "For ever action, there is an equal and opposite reaction." When the operator pulls the slide back to cock the hammer and chamber a round, the hammer depresses the hammer strut against the main spring and the sear spring moves the seer in place to catch the notch on the hammer leaving the hammer cocked. At the same time the magazine spring lifts the magazine carrier positioning a round to be loaded. When the operator releases the slide, the recoil spring that was compressed when the operator pulled the slide back, pushs the slide forward chambering a round, leaving the gun in the cocked position. When the operator presses the trigger to the rear, the sear is moved from the notch in the hammer and the main spring presses the hammer strut upward causing the hammer to rotate and strike the firing pin. This detonates the primer which ignites the power sending the bullet forward and the case backward which also pushes the slide backwards repeating the loading and cocking process. If one messes with any of the the main operators, the recoil spring, the mainspring or the ammo, one gets the physics out of balance. It typically starts when the shooter wants to shoot less powerful loads and/or lighter weight bullets in order to reduce recoil and get back on target quicker. A less powerful bullet means that the slide moves backward slower and the case is not ejected quickly enough to let the next bullet rise from the magazine or the ejected bullet to clear the eject port. So, the empty case is caught by the forward moving slide. The point I'm trying to make here is this. Get your 1911 working with 230 grain ball ammo before trying to mess with any of the physics, the mechanical dynamics, of the firearm. If it won't shoot standard ball ammo, then you have a warrenty issue with the manufacture. After it functions with factory spec ammo, then, you can begin experimenting with changing the physics. If you change one of the 3 major components that affects the timing, you must change all three. Maybe more.

    Hope this helps,
    from the nubee, Jacque
     

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