Making an old, ugly Savage 887 beautiful (pic heavy!)

Discussion in 'Other Long Gun Talk' started by spyderman2k4, Apr 26, 2010.

  1. spyderman2k4

    spyderman2k4 XDTalk 1K Member

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    I had the camera out tonight with some guns and have been snapping shots. I decided I should finally get around to posting my project I did this past winter. I have to apologize that this is VERY incomplete documentation of what I did. I didn't think right away to take pictures, and even after I did, I didn't do as good of a job as I should have. Here it is.

    About 10 years ago (I'm 24 now) my dad and I were working in one of our rental properties after some tenants left. Well, I found this old, non-functioning 22. It was gummed up beyond believe (looked like someone poured syrup over it and let it dry and harden). I took it home and took it totally apart (very simple gun to detail strip, there's nothin to it). I got it working... very exciting for a 14 year old. I stripped the stock and re-stained it. The front and rear iron sights were broken, so my dad and I got a REALLY terrible 4x15 tasco scope for it. This isn't mine (found this photo online, but it looks identical- down to the scope- to how mine looked when I redid it.
    [​IMG]

    Even when it's refinished, it's not a very pretty gun. Well, I've neglected it for probably 8 years. It was so ugly that when I had my guns listed in my signature, I never put it in there because I never even considered it a gun, it was that ugly. The scope was pretty impractical too, so that probably added to the neglect. Well, this past winter my brother and I were cleaning out our old gun cabinet and I pulled it out. It was COVERED in rust. There was almost no bluing left. I said, "Spyderman2k4, you didn't pay a dime for this thing. Put a little money and effort in and get it to the point where you'll consider it a gun." So that's what I did.

    Upon inspection, I determined that even 10 years ago, it was BARELY ever shot. Even now, with all the external rust, the bore was PERFECT. This gave me hope. A sanded off what was left of the finish and got rid of all the rust. I took a flat file and "recrowned" the muzzle as it was pretty beat up. I followed the instructions per Midway USA, found here [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OorpZlG28fI"]YouTube - Gunsmith - Crowning the muzzle of a rifle barrel[/ame].

    Then, because the sights were broken, I knocked them out of the dovedails and filled it in with JB weld to give a clean, streamlined look. Additionally, the weld holding the tube magazine to the barrel broke long before I found it, so I had only ever had a zip tie holding it together. Redneck, I know.

    The charging handle was also VERY flimsy plastic and had lots of play. Every time I pulled the bolt back it was bend. I did not like this. It made the gun feel really cheap. I had no idea how to replace it considering the market isn't like it is for the 10/22. Well, once I pulled it out I realized it was perfectly round, and exactly 5/16" thick... I just so happen to have an extra drive punch that size!

    [​IMG]
    Sorry it's so blurry, phones don't work well for closeups. The notch in it is for the firing pin. You place the charging handle in the bolt, then insert the firing pin through the rear. The pin actually holds it in place. The gap only needs to be as wide as the firing pin, but you can see how much extra space there is. This creates all the wobble.
    [​IMG]
    I cut down the punch and used a dremel cutoff wheel to cut a notch just wide enough for the firing pin to slide in. VERY solid, and no play whatsoever.

    The stock was perhaps the worst part of it. (Again, not mine, but this will give you an idea what I was workin with).
    [​IMG]
    The shape, finish, and especially checker pattern was horrendous. I decided to change this. I remembered seeing this thread My $22 mod - RimfireCentral.com Forums and decided to go for it.

    For those that don't want to read it, you basically take a factory stock and cut off parts, then glue wood back to it, and reshape it. You end up with a "new" stock without having to worry about making it fit the action like you would with making a stock from scratch.

    The first thing I did was took a huge sheet of paper and traced the existing stock. I then drew on top of that what I wanted it to look like. This gave me a guide exactly what I needed to cut, both on the stock and on the poplar I picked up to use (again, this isn't a tutorial, I'm just showin my progress. The rimfire central link has ALL the details). I used a table saw (just about all I had... I'm very limited in tools) to cut the stock.

    I wanted the forend to be a bit fatter, so I needed to add wood. In order to do that, I had to glue wood, which results in cutting to get a square, flat surface. Here's the bottom of the stock. This is the "no going back" point. I also cut the sides so it was very square.

    (Sorry, I used my phone for all the pics)
    [​IMG]

    I then used the table saw to cut what they call the "tendon." The original guy said to use a router to mill it. It's definitely a better (and probably safer) way to go, but I only had a table saw. Here's what's left after I worked with the table saw.
    [​IMG]

    Here's the top and bottom piece of the stock. The hump you see on the top part will ultimately be the "rollover" part of the raised cheek piece. These are not glued in place yet. You wanna make sure all the work on the forend is done before you have the extra mass in the back. It makes life easier.
    [​IMG]

    Here is the forend with the chunk actually glued. Side shot showing the extra mass.
    [​IMG]

    View from the top. From this perspective, the "top" looks to be further toward the back. It is. I cut that side a little too far with the saw. :oops:
    [​IMG]

     
  2. spyderman2k4

    spyderman2k4 XDTalk 1K Member

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    Now that it's glued, let the shaping begin! I used a plane, rasps, files, and sand paper. Here's how the shape turned out.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    This is looking from the rear down the right side to show the bevel a little better.
    [​IMG]

    Here's the rear pieced screwed and glued.
    [​IMG]

    From the other side
    [​IMG]

    Overall idea. It's looking like a stock again!
    [​IMG]

    I did a couple steps I didn't document (all covered in the RFC tutorial for those interested). I put a thin piece of wood on for the cheekpiece. I filled all the extra gaps with Bondo body filler, and also used the bondo to shape and smooth areas (give a nice slope around the cheek piece, as well as the rear part of the forend). This is after all initial shaping was done with the rasps, but still LOTS of sanding to do.

    I also threw a couple coats of primer and Krylon camo Khaki paint on the barreled action as well as the scope (it's gonna be a camo paint job).
    [​IMG]

    Here it is after all sanding, priming, and first base of paint was put down. [​IMG]

    Oh yeah... before I painted I used JB weld to attach the tube magazine to the barrel. This broke quickly. I used my brother's welder to re-weld the tube magazine to the barrel. He didn't want to do it cause he was afraid to burn through the thin tube. I've never welded, so it was an interesting experience! It was a REALLY ugly weld, but it was strong. I used more JB weld over the real weld just to smooth it out and make it look nice. There was no trigger guard when I found it, so I made one out of a piece of scrap metal.

    In my research of DIY camo jobs I found this Doug's Message Boards - How to paint your rifle Camouflage
    So that's what I did! I think it turned out pretty well. I had an old mossberg 835 stock, so I took the butt pad off it and shaped it to fit the 22. Not that there's recoil, but it gives it a nice, finished look. It was a lot of work, but for the rasps, wood, new scope, paint, and other miscellaneous stuff, I spent under $100 (again, including the scope). I now consider it a gun! Here's the finished product.

    [​IMG]

    I learned a LOT during this project. I've done some MINOR wood work in the past, but nothing anywhere near this. I was out of my comfort zone a little bit (if I screw up the stock, I'm SOL cause they don't make replacement ones!), but I now have the confidence to do all sorts of things. This is the first gun I've painted, and at this point I wouldn't be afraid to do it to more expensive guns if I felt so inclined. I definitely recommend that anyone that has any projects they might be hesitant to do- jump in with both feet. You'll have a blast and gain some awesome experience.
     
  3. AwPhuch

    AwPhuch XDTalk 15K Member

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    NICE!!!

    Are you going to go over it with some steel wool to break up the shine...other than that..really freeking cool!

    Great job!
     
  4. oklawall

    oklawall XDTalk 30K Member Founding Member

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    very cool
     
  5. spyderman2k4

    spyderman2k4 XDTalk 1K Member

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    Its just the way the lighting and the flash from the camera was I guess. It's a pretty flat paint and not nearly as shiny as that picture makes it look. Steel wool is still a good idea though. I'll probably give that a shot tomorrow.
     
  6. neginfluence04

    neginfluence04 XDTalk 500 Member

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    i would love to do that to an old browning bar i have but i'm scared to cut it up
     
  7. konigfritz

    konigfritz XDTalk 500 Member Founding Member

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    Well done!! looks great
     
  8. BigDinTexas

    BigDinTexas XDTalk 1K Member Founding Member

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    WOW!!! Great job. Looking at the first few pics, it appears to be a very intimidating project for my skill set, but after seeing the finished project, it is obviously worth the hard work. Makes me want to go to the local pawn shop and find an inexpensive 22LR to make a project out of. Thanks for the inspiration.

    Don

     

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