How do I use the soviet rangefinder reticle?

Discussion in 'Optics and Glass' started by PolsVoice, Jan 13, 2010.

  1. PolsVoice

    PolsVoice XDTalk 1K Member

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    I bought a POSP 3-9x42 optic for my kalashnikitty and am having some difficulty discerning how to use the reticle. The manual that came with it is entirely in Russian so it's of no use and I understand that the rangefinder in the lower left is a scale for a 1.5 meter object at various distances (starting with 200m out to 1000m).

    My question is three fold. What standard object were the russians thinking of to use as the 1.5meter standard. It used to be 1.7 or 1.8meters, roughly the size of your average man. I don't know what to base a slightly-smaller-than 5ft scale off of... (I doubt even a malnourished russian soldier would be that short)

    the horizontal hash marks are also used to help find scale, but I don't know what to reference them to. 1m? .1m?

    How are the verticle chevrons meant to be used?


    [​IMG]

     
  2. Gunner69

    Gunner69 XDTalk 100 Member

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    The top center "chevron" (^) is used as the main aiming mark. The horizontal hash marks are for windage and lead corrections and can be used as mil marks for ranging as well.
    In the bottom-left corner is a stadiametric rangefinder that can be used to determine the distance from a 170 cm (1.7 m or 5 ft 7 in) tall person/object from 200 m (2) to 1000 m (10). For this the lowest part of the target is lined up on the bottom horizontal line. Where the top of the target touches the top curved line the distance can be determined. This reticle lay out is also used in several other telescopic sights used by other former Warsaw Pact member states.
    The three lower chevrons in the center are used as hold over points for engaging erea targets beyond 1,000 meters (the maximum BDC range setting on the elevation drum). The user has to set the elevation turret to 1,000 meters and then apply the chevrons for 1,100, 1,200 or 1,300 meters respectively.[2]
    The 10 reticle hashmarks in the horizontal plane can be used to compensate for wind or moving targets and can also be used for additional stadiametric rangefinding purposes, since they are spaced at 1 milliradian intervals, meaning if an object is 5 m wide it will appear 10 hashmarks wide at 500 m.
     
  3. PolsVoice

    PolsVoice XDTalk 1K Member

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    Thankyou, but I had already checked the PSO-1 article on wikipedia which, as noted, did not answer my question. 1.7meters is indeed the average height of a man. What were the optic maker's intending to reference, then, with 1.5 meters? A window casement? The height from a doorknob to the top of the door?
     
  4. PolsVoice

    PolsVoice XDTalk 1K Member

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    anyone?

     

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