Dents in JHP

Discussion in 'The Ammo Can' started by smikesmith3, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. smikesmith3

    smikesmith3 XDTalk Member

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    I picked up some 40 JHP Federal low recoil. I see some dents in the casing. It is very slight. Also it is much tougher to put a full mag in with the JHP. I really have to slam it in.

    I'm going to shoot a few of them tomorrow. Any thoughts?
     
  2. JustSomeGuy

    JustSomeGuy XDTalk 2K Member

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    There are a lot of factors that need to be addressed before we can give an opinion. Is the gun one of the XD family of pistols? Is the mag new? Have you taken any measurements of the rounds in question? OAL is one needed as well as the width of the loaded round at the middle of the case and the mouth of the case.

    As to the dents... it sounds like someone else had the same experience and returned them. Small case dents, if they are not actual cuts, will have no effect as they will get "ironed out" when the round is fired. If they are severe, they could make the case harder to chamber if it resulted in an out of round condition which makes the thing ovoid in shape.

    Normally, I do not insert a magazine unless the slide is back anyway. It is generally harder to insert a full magazine into a semi-auto pistol if the slide is closed because the top round will hit the underside of the barrel and the mag spring is already fully compressed. If you are experiencing hard insertion with the slide back, then you have a problem. Otherwise, the only thing about JHP is they might be slightly longer and thus the top round is bearing a little more on the bottom of the barrel during a closed slide insertion of the full magazine. If you take out one round and try it, it should be easier to do until the magazine spring takes a "set" and has a bit less energy. If you leave the mag fully loaded for a few days (if it is factory new) this could help.
     
  3. smikesmith3

    smikesmith3 XDTalk Member

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    Thanks for the feedback, guess I should have expanded more.

    It is a .40 XDm, the mags are new. I have not taken any measurements and the 'dents' are ever so slight. I wouldn't even know if they were there when I first opened them. Not every one has them, I plan on shooting 2 dented ones and 2 regular ones. The dent is just in the casing and like I said, hardly noticeable. Thanks for the tip on the mags, I'll have to do that to loosen them about a bit.

    Also, there is a noticeable difference when loading the mag with the slide back. Much easier. Thanks for that tip.
     
  4. Trotgolfer

    Trotgolfer XDTalk 100 Member

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    It will fire...
     
  5. Knightslugger

    Knightslugger XDTalk 5K Member

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    those dents will be pressed out as soon as you pull the trigger on them.

    don't worry about the dents.

    when you insert a magazine into a handgun that is in battery (slide fully forward) you are pressing the bullets down further into the magazine as the bar that strips the cartridges is directly over the magazine and naturally it must be longer so that it can grab the cartridge reliably. A fully loaded magazine doesn't have as much give in movement as a partially loaded magazine does. It's no different as if you tired to load another bullet into the magazine or the stripper bar rides over them in the handgun.

    when you open the slide, that bar moves backwards with the slide (it's machined into the slide afterall) into the stripping position and no longer rides over the cartridges in the magazine so there's no downward pressure, making it easy to insert mags that lock into the catch.

    I shouldn't have to explain this to you, or to anyone for that matter... it's not rocket science. some critical thinking while inspecting the operation of the firearm should give you the answer as to why it's more difficult to insert a fully loaded magazine into a handgun with a closed slide than it is with a partially loaded magazine or open slide.
     
  6. divxrippimp

    divxrippimp XDTalk 500 Member

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    **Posted from my Moto Charm using Tapatalk**
     
  7. Knightslugger

    Knightslugger XDTalk 5K Member

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    ...do tell...
     
  8. dglock

    dglock XDTalk 3K Member

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    The rounds in the mag will not hit the underside of the barrel.

    When a loaded mag is inserted with the slide closed, the rounds contact the bottom of the slide,not the barrel.

    don
     
  9. divxrippimp

    divxrippimp XDTalk 500 Member

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    LOL I was just quoting you

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