.40 165 grain FN reload

Discussion in 'The Ammo Can' started by buzzwood, Jan 15, 2013.

  1. buzzwood

    buzzwood XDTalk Newbie

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    I'm looking for reloading data using Accurate No 7 and 165 grain Rainier flat nose bullet. There seems to be limited information for No 7.
    It will be used my my XDM.

    Thanks,
     
  2. 57K

    57K XDTalk 2K Member

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    Just checked the Accurate data I have downloaded and you're right. Cast lead data jumps from 155 to 175 grs and the heaviest plated bullet they show data for is 155 grs. In this case you're kind of lucky because the jacketed 165 gr. bullet they list is the Sierra 165 gr. JHP which is a kind of worse case scenario type bullet because it has a long shank and higher coefficient of friction than many 165 gr. jacketed bullets. In this case I would use the start charge for the 165 gr. Sierra JHP @ 8.4 grs. or since the 165 is exactly halfway in weight between the 155 (8.7 gr.) and the 175 (7.6 gr.) cast bullets you might be able to start a tad lower at say 8.2 but I'd only load a few rounds (5-10) at that chargeweight to make sure the rounds will function the slide. In any case, I'd keep looking for data as this is just a starting point and doesn't give you a load range for the 165. ;)
     
  3. fredj338

    fredj338 XDTalk 10K Member

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    The other apporach is to use heavier bullet data for the lighter 165gr bullet. You can always use heavier bullet data with lighter bullets. Since a plated bullet is NOT a lead or jacketed, it really loads between the two. So using lead data offers an even greater safety margin w/ plated bullets. I would use the midrange data for the 175gr LSWC & work that up, only because AA#7 doesn't like to run w/ light charge wts.
     
  4. 777TRUTH

    777TRUTH XDTalk 100 Member

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    fredj338 gave you excellent advice. IMO AA#5 would be a better choice in the .40.
     
  5. JustSomeGuy

    JustSomeGuy XDTalk 2K Member

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    57K, Fred, and 777TRUTH have all given good advice here. See... the thing to remember when using any of the slower burning powders for a particular caliber is that they need enough pressure to operate correctly or you're gonna get very wide standard deviation numbers or extreme spread (in feet per second of velocity) numbers from the load. It just won't "light up" completely without a way to generate pretty good internal pressure for the caliber. That means that heavier bullets for the caliber and loadings in the upper 1/2 or more for the bullet weight are required to get the best effeciency from the slower powder.

    So with the combination you are proposing of AA7 and the 165grn bullet in .40, as noted by the other esteemed members, you have to contend with two things.

    1) You gotta run the gun! You need enough power to operate a semi-auto pistol with any reloading choice while staying within the safe limits of course.

    2) You have to create enough pressure to make the load viable. In this case, as 777TRUTH pointed out, with that bullet, perhaps another powder would be a better choice, but AA7 has been used to good effect in this caliber.

    If all you have is AA7, and 165grn bullets, you can certainly make it work, but hopefully you have a chronograph available to you to see when your experiments cross over into a range where your extreme spreads are reduced to a minimum and so your standard deviation numbers fall to acceptable limits like the low double digits (20 or below I would think for SD). This will indicate that the powder is burning more completely and consistently and will make for a safer load too. That is why there are "minimum" as well as "maximum" loadings for a particular combination as powders get squirrely when they operate outside their design limits.
     

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